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View Full Version : Great Quote from Dennis Wolf regarding training.....



JOHN GARGANI
02-08-2012, 07:14 AM
thought I would like to share this on here:



"I never was able to get a good pump in my back even though everything else always pumped up fine"

"Then , my friend Dennis James had me start exaggerating the contractions by squeezing the muscle as hard as I can for two whole seconds at the end of every rep-and what a difference it made"

it has always been my contention that we are cheating ourselves by rushing sets and reps, and leaving out that contraction at the end of the top part of any movement, really can help, as Wolf points out.

Often , in many of the videos of the pros training, you will see them pumping out reps at alarming speed, barely stopping at all: keep in mind, that they are already huge, from a lifetime of lifting and other, ahem, benefits.

for the natural, non-genetically gifted trainer, of which the vast majority of us fall in, we need every perk and tweak possible, and holding a contraction like that at the end of a set can be dynamite, especially in the case of LATS, as he was referring to.

the trick is think of EACH REP, as a "SET" unto itself, so to speak......

dazlittle
02-08-2012, 07:17 AM
Good advice, I read something similar before and have employed this method for both Chinup, pullups and cable pulldowns, seems to make a big difference.

JOHN GARGANI
02-08-2012, 07:19 AM
just thought of an example: When I moved last AUGUST, one of the moving men, a really densely muscled guy, sat down on my seated dip machine and was pumping out reps effortlessly and told me, it was too light.

there was about 120 pounds on it at the time.....

I laughed and said: okay, watch this and try doing your reps THIS way: I then proceeded to show him very slow and controlled reps where you hold the contraction of all of the upper body muscles for a good 2 seconds or more at the bottom, before slowly resisting the upward motion.

he then sat down and did just a couple like that, and stopped and said "WHEW!" "Was that the same weight I was just pushing around before?"

hey: look at it like this: if mindless endless repetition was the answer to Bodybuilding, typists would have huge muscles on their fingers, right? LOL.....

MecGen
02-08-2012, 07:35 AM
Hi John
I have always thought that the speed that one does the exercise was used as a change up tool kinda like slowing down the neg side of the lift. Holding the lift on calves...hurts :)




hey: look at it like this: if mindless endless repetition was the answer to Bodybuilding, typists would have huge muscles on their fingers, right? LOL.....

Funny

Regards

JohnDavis111
02-08-2012, 07:57 AM
that was one of the first things my new PT changed about how I lift. No longer am I doing fast up/down or any rocking motion. Slow deliberate with a slight pause. Huge difference its making for me I think. He swears by it.

ArchAngel'73
02-08-2012, 12:42 PM
I frequently close my eyes when training back to help facilitate the mind/muscle connection, it helps alot.

Guinea-pig
02-09-2012, 08:20 AM
that was one of the first things my new PT changed about how I lift. No longer am I doing fast up/down or any rocking motion. Slow deliberate with a slight pause. Huge difference its making for me I think. He swears by it.

There is a huge difference like you said the negative part of the movement is needed to put the proper load on your muscles.

Guinea-pig
02-09-2012, 08:43 AM
I frequently close my eyes when training back to help facilitate the mind/muscle connection, it helps alot.

I hear your on that Im fortunate enough to have a good training partner and when training back he will put his finger between my lats and tell me to try and squeeze it.

Firminator4
02-09-2012, 08:46 AM
just thought of an example: When I moved last AUGUST, one of the moving men, a really densely muscled guy, sat down on my seated dip machine and was pumping out reps effortlessly and told me, it was too light.

there was about 120 pounds on it at the time.....

I laughed and said: okay, watch this and try doing your reps THIS way: I then proceeded to show him very slow and controlled reps where you hold the contraction of all of the upper body muscles for a good 2 seconds or more at the bottom, before slowly resisting the upward motion.

he then sat down and did just a couple like that, and stopped and said "WHEW!" "Was that the same weight I was just pushing around before?"

hey: look at it like this: if mindless endless repetition was the answer to Bodybuilding, typists would have huge muscles on their fingers, right? LOL.....

John are you referring to the "Superslow protocol" method of lifting weights?

egoatdoor
02-10-2012, 06:03 PM
thought I would like to share this on here:




it has always been my contention that we are cheating ourselves by rushing sets and reps, and leaving out that contraction at the end of the top part of any movement, really can help, as Wolf points out.

Often , in many of the videos of the pros training, you will see them pumping out reps at alarming speed, barely stopping at all: keep in mind, that they are already huge, from a lifetime of lifting and other, ahem, benefits.

for the natural, non-genetically gifted trainer, of which the vast majority of us fall in, we need every perk and tweak possible, and holding a contraction like that at the end of a set can be dynamite, especially in the case of LATS, as he was referring to.

the trick is think of EACH REP, as a "SET" unto itself, so to speak......

Holding the contraction has been the teaching of Dorian Yates for years. A big disciple of his training philosophy.


I frequently close my eyes when training back to help facilitate the mind/muscle connection, it helps alot. Same here. I also use it on all bodyparts when muscle fatigue starts to set in late in a set. This allows full focus to be placed on working the targeted muscle.

Kraken
02-10-2012, 06:13 PM
Variation can play a huge role in muscle growth and strength when it comes to methods like tempo, rest pauses, DE, ME etc. I think most of us can appreciate that. The only problem is, even people who can appreciate that, still don't use them in their own training!

Back exercises are a very strange beast to many people. The reason why, is that when done right for the first time, the movement feels very unnatural. To imagine that direct connection between the hands and the lats so that the biceps don't do all of the work, that contraction at the top of the movement etc. It does take practice, and every now and then, I have to really focus on it because I tend to stray from that form and method.

JOHN GARGANI
02-11-2012, 05:17 AM
To imagine that direct connection between the hands and the lats so that the biceps don't do all of the work, that contraction at the top of the movement etc. It does take practice, and every now and then, I have to really focus on it because I tend to stray from that form and method.


yes, and this is the KEY to proper lat training....there are far too many not even aware of what you just said...

rand18m
02-11-2012, 09:12 AM
thought I would like to share this on here:




it has always been my contention that we are cheating ourselves by rushing sets and reps, and leaving out that contraction at the end of the top part of any movement, really can help, as Wolf points out.

Often , in many of the videos of the pros training, you will see them pumping out reps at alarming speed, barely stopping at all: keep in mind, that they are already huge, from a lifetime of lifting and other, ahem, benefits.

for the natural, non-genetically gifted trainer, of which the vast majority of us fall in, we need every perk and tweak possible, and holding a contraction like that at the end of a set can be dynamite, especially in the case of LATS, as he was referring to.

the trick is think of EACH REP, as a "SET" unto itself, so to speak......

Good post! I agree and practice what you're preaching!! Thanks!

paolo59
02-11-2012, 09:35 AM
Good stuff! I do believe that lats are the easiest body part to train inadequately, and perhaps even incorrectly!