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View Full Version : Military looking at DMAA in soldiers deaths



GreenWave1
02-03-2012, 06:57 AM
I know a lot of people here use Jack3d. You might find this interesting:

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2012/02/02/soldier-deaths-during-training-sparks-military-probe-into-supplement-use/?test=latestnews

I've wondered for a while if dmaa would end up controlled in the US. Reaction to something like this might make it happen.

2BLAZERS
02-03-2012, 09:55 AM
It will be interesting to follow. 2 death's is too many but with 400+ million doses it will be hard to pinpoint it only at Jack3d. So many times things have more then 1 cause, they'll likely ban it, then the next supplement will come out, the cycle continues. I wonder how many people have died after drinking coffee or water?

P.S. I don't use it. If I'm needing Jack3d to workout then I need to be eating better and getting more sleep....

bigtallox
02-03-2012, 10:08 AM
they'll likely ban it, then the next supplement will come out, the cycle continues.


Exactly. If they want to prevent deaths, they should just make the stuff that works legal, then people wouldn't be trying all this crazy stuff that's probably way more dangerous. But since they don't so that, it makes me think the government baning things has nothing to do with saving lives.




I wonder how many people have died after drinking coffee or water?


Yeah, they should ban coffee. But they never will because it has no redeming qualities, so they don't care.

Jimbo48
02-03-2012, 10:35 AM
Yeah, they should ban coffee. But they never will because it has no redeming qualities, so they don't care.

I wouldn't say that coffee has no redeeming qualities.
http://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/features/coffee-new-health-food

bigtallox
02-03-2012, 10:53 AM
I wouldn't say that coffee has no redeeming qualities.
http://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/features/coffee-new-health-food

Wow, if Neil Osterweil says its true, it must be true, lol. After all he was awarded a BA from Brandeis University. A BA degree, sheesh, that makes me a super expert with my two graduate degrees. My Mom always told me that drinking coffee stunts your growth, I've never drank coffee and I'm 6'8" tall, so there you have it, I guess I should write an article.

Old-Time-Lifter
02-03-2012, 10:57 AM
Yeah, they should ban coffee. But they never will because it has no redeming qualities, so they don't care.

Strongly considering negg'ing you for this comment...........

You can diss anyone you want but back off of dissing the Java..........

We clear on that one?

samori
02-03-2012, 11:24 AM
I was at the exchange the other day and the store workers were clearing other pre-workout supps from the shelves. They said while it wasn't illegal to use in the military (at this point) the exchanges had been asked not to sell it.

The military is starting to keep a close eye on those.

michail71
02-03-2012, 11:38 AM
There have been many benefits linked to coffee and no real evidence that it has adverse effects in healthy individuals. The idea it's bad for you is nothing more than old wives tails. It's also a rich source of antioxidants.

However, if the benefits of coffee drinking is a threat to the pharmaceutical industry they may try to ban it.

x-trainer ben
02-03-2012, 01:36 PM
This is the lead story at the top of the business section b1 in the ny times. It has a nice color pictures of oxy elite pro and jack3d. Way to scare people, the two most popular supps and it is worthy of the top of the business section, c'mon!

Jimbo48
02-03-2012, 01:55 PM
Wow, if Neil Osterweil says its true, it must be true, lol. After all he was awarded a BA from Brandeis University. A BA degree, sheesh, that makes me a super expert with my two graduate degrees. My Mom always told me that drinking coffee stunts your growth, I've never drank coffee and I'm 6'8" tall, so there you have it, I guess I should write an article.

Here's another article from a more respected institution and it says basically the same as the other article. Please feel free to ridicule this one too.
http://www.health.harvard.edu/press_releases/coffee_health_benefits