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hpfiend
02-02-2012, 05:25 AM
Hey all-
Wanted to get your opinion on something. I read Mark Rippetoes starting strength and did it for a few months before I got injured. Later I realized that it wasn't the workouts at all that caused the injury .

I wondering if you guys/gals increase weight every workout like the book advises or if that is better suited for high school football players.

mEDo
02-02-2012, 05:44 AM
Hey all-
Wanted to get your opinion on something. I read Mark Rippetoes starting strength and did it for a few months before I got injured. Later I realized that it wasn't the workouts at all that caused the injury .

I wondering if you guys/gals increase weight every workout like the book advises or if that is better suited for high school football players.

Increasing weight every workout would be great, but at one point, you simply can't do that any more - it takes some time for muscles to increase the strength, not to mention CNS fatigue ...

jdtemple
02-02-2012, 06:50 AM
I don't know much about the Starting Strength program. I could be completely wrong, but I was under the impression that when you are unable to increase the weight every workout, it's time to move off of Starting Strength and into a more intermediate program.

Singe03
02-02-2012, 06:57 AM
Hey all-
Wanted to get your opinion on something. I read Mark Rippetoes starting strength and did it for a few months before I got injured. Later I realized that it wasn't the workouts at all that caused the injury .

I wondering if you guys/gals increase weight every workout like the book advises or if that is better suited for high school football players.

It's probably designed for a bit younger crowd than I fit in to, but I follow the program pretty closely with a strong understanding that I'm 43 and not 18 and I'm happy with how it's working for me.

I do increase every workout, but I also take opportunities to draw it out at times and I just took a full reset to deload when I didn't really meet the full criteria because in truth I just needed one. Outside factors were causing me to not get enough rest, so my recovery wasn't up to speed and I think I just outpaced my recovery abilities. Whether I could have bounced back with a couple good nights sleep at 18 or not is debatable.

Here is what I do, or how I've tweaked it.

SS original program. I did however add dips and pullups. No other "tweaks" to the lifts. (braces for lecture on modding SS).

Lifts increase 5lb per workout except deads which increase 10. Press will likely be increasing 2.5 per workout real soon.

Ripp says to make a judgement call if you have a miss, say you hit 5,5,4 you might increase the weight anyway by his rules, my rule is that I do not. If I don't get 5,5,5 with good form, I repeat. Three misses will lead to a reset of that lift.

I've done one full reset already just because I felt I needed to deload, Ripp doesn't call for this in the program unless you are stalling on multiple lifts, which I wasn't but I did find it beneficial and came back stronger. He also says only 1 or 2 resets on Squats and Deads, or full resets and I plan to do a few, until I can't come back after a reset and add weight twice to my previous best.

It may not really be SS, but I think it's a good plan for me.

crupiea
02-02-2012, 08:49 AM
I did it for along time or some variation of it.

This was in my late 40's.

j1akey
02-02-2012, 09:00 AM
I'm doing the program right now and gains every workout are possible when you start but that only lasts for so long and mileage may vary from person to person.

Smelly bull
02-02-2012, 09:07 AM
I've run the Bill Starr 5x5 program and yup, I increased the weight every time...Just as the program stated. Right now I am doing the Coan/Phillipi deadlift program that goes up in weight for the 1st 4 weeks, then down, then back up. I am in week 7 hitting my numbers.

I know very little about SS, but what I do know about other programs is you must be accurate in your initial max. Jim Wendler (5/3/1) I believe is the one who recommend reduce your max by 10% ('cause most of us are full of **** anyway when it comes to maxes..lol).. This will help you hit your numbers.

ironwill2008
02-02-2012, 09:08 AM
I wondering if you guys/gals increase weight every workout like the book advises or if that is better suited for high school football players.
Beginners can most often add weight to the bar on a near-continuous basis. When you are no longer able to follow the program's progression specifics, it's probaly time to move to a different, more appropriate program.

Barring any medial issues, age shouldn't have anything to do with how you train/which program you use. Simply scale your choice to your own level of experience. IOW, a noob shouldn't try to train on a program designed for an advanced trainee.

v1rt
02-02-2012, 09:19 AM
hi hpfiend,

I started Jan 15 of this year again. I did workout 2 years ago for about 3 months but I stopped due to work.

This is what I have been doing so far and it's working for me very well. I do 5-6 sets, first set being my warm-up set.

For example like for incline bench, I start with 35 reps of 45 lbs. Then I increase to
65 lbs x 15
95 lbs x 10
95 lbs x 10
115 lbs x 6
115 lbs x 4

I did this for 2 weeks. It was very tough for me. I think I wasn't able to complete the reps(my last set) of the 115 lbs during my first workout. After 2+ weeks of doing this, I noticed that even at the 4th rep of 115 lbs, I felt that I can still push it. Last Monday, I increased my 5th set to 125 lbs at 4 reps and I was still strong. For the last set(6th set), I tried 135 lbs, 4 reps and I was still ok but it was getting tough. If I had a spotter, I think I will be able to do 150 lbs. So for the next 2 weeks, I'll be lifting 135 lbs for my incline.

I think in 2 weeks time, our muscles become stronger. I don't increase the weight every gym day. I stay at it for 2 weeks. That's what I was told. Also, I've been eating a lot which I think is helping.

One tip: since I am working out alone, I don't put locks on my bars. Like the other day, I was doing a close grip bench at 135 lbs, last set at 4th set, my triceps were so friggin tired, I was only able to lift the bar about 12" from my chest, so I slowly brought down my left arm to let the plates fell and the right followed but was very fast. LOL :D I have about 3/4" padding in my basement. It was still loud though. :)

billb7581
02-02-2012, 09:30 AM
I increase reps every workout, my program increases the weight every 5 weeks by 10 percent.

week 1 8 reps
week 5 12 reps
week 6 move weight up 10 percent and drop back down to 8 reps.

2mucleUp
02-02-2012, 10:46 AM
I try to increase my Wt every workout, but I do it slowly 1/2 to 1 lb each week to whatever exercises I do. I find that adding 5 to 10 too big of an increase.


2Mu

fastnoypi
02-02-2012, 11:23 AM
i try to increase weight with every workout, but certain excercises i've stalled such as deadlift. My legs are capable but my grip strength seems to need more time for the added weight.
On bench i'm a little cautious because tendonosis caught me before..I try to add on more weight every two weeks.

bigtallox
02-02-2012, 11:33 AM
Hey all-
Wanted to get your opinion on something. I read Mark Rippetoes starting strength and did it for a few months before I got injured. Later I realized that it wasn't the workouts at all that caused the injury .

I wondering if you guys/gals increase weight every workout like the book advises or if that is better suited for high school football players.

Beginners can increase weight every session, but eventually strength increases don't come linearly like that. It's not that it's suited for high school football players, it's a BEGINNER program, it's called STARTING Strength after all.

Dave76
02-02-2012, 12:27 PM
Beginners can increase weight every session, but eventually strength increases don't come linearly like that. It's not that it's suited for high school football players, it's a BEGINNER program, it's called STARTING Strength after all.
This is true. All novices can increase weight with linear progression. An older novice will likely need a less aggressive approach. You may need to add less weight each time and you probably won't be able to run the program as long as a younger novice.

Yes, you will get stuck, probably on the press and bench press first, the squat and dead lift later. Follow the instructions with the program to learn about resets, deloads, etc. Pay attention because the program is teaching you a way to get past minor plateaus. You are learning something about periodization and progression. It's just a start but you're learning something that will be useful throughout your weight training career.

Eventually, you reach the point that you just can't add weight in a linear fashion. When you get to that point, you're not a novice and you move on to more complex progression schemes.

bigtallox
02-02-2012, 12:32 PM
This is true. All novices can increase weight with linear progression. An older novice will likely need a less aggressive approach. You may need to add less weight each time


Nobody was talking about the slope of the line. No, older beginners still can experience liner progression ( the slope of the line may be different, but it's still linear ).

HairyScandinavian
02-02-2012, 12:33 PM
Hey all-
Wanted to get your opinion on something. I read Mark Rippetoes starting strength and did it for a few months before I got injured. Later I realized that it wasn't the workouts at all that caused the injury .

I wondering if you guys/gals increase weight every workout like the book advises or if that is better suited for high school football players.

My son is a high school football player. I bought him the book and he laid the hammer down on the SS process, he tried to keep up with the increasing numbers and ended up hurting his back after a few months. I'm figuring he sacrificed form to keep the numbers going up, he says his form was fine but you know how that goes. I guess what I'm saying is just listen to your body, if a high school football player can't keep up with the schedule and you hit a brick wall it's best to take a step back and restart.

Dave76
02-02-2012, 01:09 PM
Nobody was talking about the slope of the line. No, older beginners still can experience liner progression ( the slope of the line may be different, but it's still linear ).
Of course no one was talking about the slope of the line. That's why I mentioned it. He asked if an older guy can add weight like a younger guy. The answer is yes but at a shallower slope (and a shorter line).

Either I misread your response or you misread mine. We don't disagree on this. At least I don't think we do.

NitrogenWidget
02-02-2012, 01:49 PM
I switched to bulking last month & every week i'm either increasing reps or adding weight to my lifts.
But man, i'm sore all week so i'm only able to work each body part once a week.

hammerfelt
02-02-2012, 02:11 PM
Yes, you can be "old" and still add weight every workout. Don't let your age fool you or get in the way of progress.

hpfiend
02-02-2012, 05:05 PM
Thanks so much for all of the informative replies! I need to read the sections on resetting and deloading again. I know I felt like hell all week but was getting stronger every workout somehow. I workout alone as well but lift in a power rack- maybe I should ditch the locks as well... I wouldnt increase either if I couldnt do the last 5 cleanly thanks! I really like this section of the forum!

jkreuze
02-02-2012, 05:26 PM
I did it for eight weeks and saw great gains, but Mr lower back was not pleased around week eight with the increasingly heavy squats and deads. I'm in my late 30s now though and not in such great shape.

Wish I had been doing it in the 90s when I was in college and on the dormitory meal plan.