PDA

View Full Version : Rehabbing elbow tendonitis



Whattheshizzle
02-01-2012, 06:50 PM
Well, its been 8 months since injuring my elbow (overuse) and therefore no lifting. Its finally feeling better but there's no way to put a date on when to start working out other than just letting pain be your guide. Anyone out there go thru a similar thing? I've rested it (patience is a virtue) and do not want to re-injure so the plan is to baby step it back into use. Wondering how long it will take, certain exercises to loosen it up, that kind of thing.

freebirdmac
02-01-2012, 06:56 PM
Using forearm bands every time I lift and avoiding exercises that really aggravate it.

http://www.amazon.com/Pro-Band-ABI00-Therapeutic-Forearm/dp/B000FML7SW/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1328147789&sr=8-1

ChicagoWineGeek
02-01-2012, 07:33 PM
I don't know that I have anything to add here, but here is my experience. I got a wicked case of tennis elbow and went through 6 weeks of PT. Helped a lot and I continue to do the exercises. It hasn't returned. But I just got the same problem, but with a different muscle. Doing bench press, I got insane pain in my tricep where it entered the elbow. Went back to my Dr. and it was diagnosed as bilateral tricep tendonitis. I just stared PT for that and it is ultrasound and starting some exercises. I can't do flat bench or any tricep work. I would suggest checking into physical therapy.

Whattheshizzle
02-01-2012, 08:05 PM
thanks, guys. I just now read a couple of threads on here related to this one & got some good info from them! Sucks that i'll still have to rest for awhile...

keyboardworkout
02-01-2012, 08:16 PM
Read lots of responses on powerlifting forums about how great Thera-Band Flexbars are.

zB3TVb8a5mk

JOHN GARGANI
02-02-2012, 03:52 AM
SHIZZLE: I'll tell my sad story, but once again: I had a similar problem, very serious, which really would not go away, and would return from even gripping a weight. 8 months is nothing, how about EIGHT YEARS! yes, that is what happened to me.

from age 32 to 40......and like most people, yes, from overuse, but really FROM DOING EXERCISES INCORRECTLY, and most importantly: FROM NOT LISTENING TO YOUR BODY.

at age 40, I decided that I simply knew too much about anatomy and the human body to let this happen, and became a student of kinesiology.

From then to now, 21 blissful years of training without any serious or lasting injury, and the tendonitis, although there in the wings waiting, never let out of it's cage again.

Regardless of what you wear, or eat or whatever, it always comes down to HOW you do certain movements.

you must:

1. learn to completely eliminate that which just doesn't work for YOUR body

2. tailor and customize ones that can

3. stick with a limited group of movements that will not cause you harm.

that is it, and it is an endeavor, and can't be done without a combination of study, and intense concentration and listening to what your body is telling and learning how to distinguish "good" pain, from bad.

bigtallox
02-02-2012, 04:29 AM
3. stick with a limited group of movements that will not cause you harm.


That can be a hard one when you want to compete and one of the movements that causes harm is benching. I sometimes get elbow tendonitis from benching ( overhead pressing never bothers it ). I've found that warming up correctly, and ice after training helps a lot.

bbsitum
02-02-2012, 06:36 AM
I avoid rows for 2 months and start use straps. I do rows again. No completely out of wood but workable.

bbsitum
02-02-2012, 06:40 AM
SHIZZLE: I'll tell my sad story, but once again: I had a similar problem, very serious, which really would not go away, and would return from even gripping a weight. 8 months is nothing, how about EIGHT YEARS! yes, that is what happened to me.

from age 32 to 40......and like most people, yes, from overuse, but really FROM DOING EXERCISES INCORRECTLY, and most importantly: FROM NOT LISTENING TO YOUR BODY.

at age 40, I decided that I simply knew too much about anatomy and the human body to let this happen, and became a student of kinesiology.

From then to now, 21 blissful years of training without any serious or lasting injury, and the tendonitis, although there in the wings waiting, never let out of it's cage again.

Regardless of what you wear, or eat or whatever, it always comes down to HOW you do certain movements.

you must:

1. learn to completely eliminate that which just doesn't work for YOUR body

2. tailor and customize ones that can

3. stick with a limited group of movements that will not cause you harm.

that is it, and it is an endeavor, and can't be done without a combination of study, and intense concentration and listening to what your body is telling and learning how to distinguish "good" pain, from bad.
Like this. Did copy paste to MyDockuments

Whattheshizzle
02-02-2012, 11:45 AM
good stuff. I'm 46 now and have been an athlete all my life but just started in the gym 2 years ago. Didn't know how to eat clean or even to drink a protein shake post workout but still loved every minute of it. Worked with an ex-nfl player/ personal trainer and injured my back one month into it. So after a year of rest & rehab I'm back into it with another personal trainer and one month into it BAM! tendonosis! Point being like you say, know what you are doing and if it hurts avoid it.

sweepone
02-02-2012, 12:15 PM
I had a bad case of tennis elbow. Stopped lifting entirely for 4 months and just about every day did 4-5 different Physical Therapies for the condition I found on youtube. Pain is about 95% gone and have gone back to light lifting..I'm still paranoid about it coming back and I'm going to watch the pain.

Another big help was wearing the tennis elbow brace. I wore it basically 24/7

ezra76
02-02-2012, 01:11 PM
I've had it several times. Started a few years back when I was nuts about playing golf. It flared up again last spring when I started trying to go heavy with dumbell bench and weighted dips.

Rest and avoiding that which caused it are the only things that worked for me. If I can give you some positive motivation, mine was still mildly aggrevating when I started back consistently lifting in October (I don't lift much in the summer, too busy) and it's gone now. Almost like starting back lifting helped it it seems.

I try to avoid exercises that put too much stress on my elbows.

marcello696
02-02-2012, 02:50 PM
it took me about 8 weeks to recover from my elbow pain. Only seemed to bother me doing skull crushers and any other overhead tricep excercises so I focused on other things and just last week I've been pain free.

Biggest mistake I made was trying to work through the pain. It wasn't until I gave the elbow proper rest did it heal properly

hrpuffnstuff2u
02-02-2012, 11:24 PM
OK, for 52 you have gorgeous arms!!! My goal is to increase my biceps but I have tendonitis on both arms/elbows. LOVE your biceps!
Kelley

danow
02-02-2012, 11:46 PM
Well, its been 8 months since injuring my elbow (overuse) and therefore no lifting. Its finally feeling better but there's no way to put a date on when to start working out other than just letting pain be your guide. Anyone out there go thru a similar thing? I've rested it (patience is a virtue) and do not want to re-injure so the plan is to baby step it back into use. Wondering how long it will take, certain exercises to loosen it up, that kind of thing.

Try supplementing with cissus quadrangularis.

JOHN GARGANI
02-03-2012, 03:54 AM
That can be a hard one when you want to compete and one of the movements that causes harm is benching. I sometimes get elbow tendonitis from benching ( overhead pressing never bothers it ). I've found that warming up correctly, and ice after training helps a lot.



fortunately, OX: Benching is one of those exercises that CAN be tailored many ways to "fit"...of course, in your case, since you are competing, as you said, there isn't much choice....




Like this. Did copy paste to MyDockuments


BB: I just kind of write it out of head every now and then....just another "could've" "should've" story, and the bodybuilding field is littered with them.....

bbsitum
02-03-2012, 07:29 AM
good stuff. I'm 46 now and have been an athlete all my life but just started in the gym 2 years ago. Didn't know how to eat clean or even to drink a protein shake post workout but still loved every minute of it. Worked with an ex-nfl player/ personal trainer and injured my back one month into it. So after a year of rest & rehab I'm back into it with another personal trainer and one month into it BAM! tendonosis! Point being like you say, know what you are doing and if it hurts avoid it.

Clearly in this sport is all about knowledge avoid to get hurt. And no one trainer can't know what exercise is good for me better then me, because I can fill my body not him. Google is our best friend. My complain is because of stupid no straps rule many of as have problem with elbows. Carry straps when work back.

snorkelman
02-03-2012, 02:23 PM
Post #6 has some great advice.


I avoid rows for 2 months and start use straps. I do rows again. No completely out of wood but workable.

I went 6 weeks with no rows, and slowly brought them back with machines first and then cable row with wrist hook, to finally back to dumbbells. I still have to use the wrist hook for my arm with the tendonitis, but I am back to some decent weight.


it took me about 8 weeks to recover from my elbow pain. Only seemed to bother me doing skull crushers and any other overhead tricep excercises so I focused on other things and just last week I've been pain free.

Biggest mistake I made was trying to work through the pain. It wasn't until I gave the elbow proper rest did it heal properly

^^ AGreed. At 8 weeks I tried skull crushers but the pain was right back there, so I gave them up for the next few months and will try them again (light weight) after a couple more months. There are plenty of other options, so no biggie.

I find ice to be very effective to keep inflammation down.

JOHN GARGANI
02-03-2012, 02:31 PM
At 8 weeks I tried skull crushers but the pain was right back there, so I gave them up for the next few months and will try them again (light weight) after a couple more months. There are plenty of other options, so no biggie.


SNORK: strict skull crushers, as many do them, are HELL to the elbow joint: the problem, is that you are using the elbow joint ALONE as a fulcrum, and it is simply too much stress on such a joint.

the solution is simple: you must do LYING TRICEPS EXTENSIONS, which is a variation of skull crushers, but here, you allow the bar to go BEHIND your head and down a bit, and , this is the most important, when you begin the upward movement you purposely allow your lats to start the motion, smoothly, though, not suddenly or herky jerky....

by letting the lats START the motion, but then finishing it with Triceps, you get past the weak link fulcrum point of the elbow....

trust me: doing them in this manner will be an enlightenment for you......

again: in this scenario, you are INTENTIONALLY LOOSENING UP THE FORM.

snorkelman
02-03-2012, 03:18 PM
the solution is simple: you must do LYING TRICEPS EXTENSIONS, which is a variation of skull crushers, but here, you allow the bar to go BEHIND your head and down a bit, ...

I found something online that seems to be what you are talking about. Maybe critique any parts of the video that you'd change (exercise we are talking about starts @ 1:10)

LVqdtjlzJWQ

PYR8
02-03-2012, 03:23 PM
Well, its been 8 months since injuring my elbow (overuse) and therefore no lifting. Its finally feeling better but there's no way to put a date on when to start working out other than just letting pain be your guide. Anyone out there go thru a similar thing? I've rested it (patience is a virtue) and do not want to re-injure so the plan is to baby step it back into use. Wondering how long it will take, certain exercises to loosen it up, that kind of thing.

8 months is plenty long enough for it to have recovered. Look into MYOTHERAPY aka TRIGGER POINT THERAPY.
Do a websearch for Bonnie Prudden - simple, effective, and you can do it yourself at home. Good luck

bbsitum
02-03-2012, 04:05 PM
SNORK: strict skull crushers, as many do them, are HELL to the elbow joint: the problem, is that you are using the elbow joint ALONE as a fulcrum, and it is simply too much stress on such a joint.

the solution is simple: you must do LYING TRICEPS EXTENSIONS, which is a variation of skull crushers, but here, you allow the bar to go BEHIND your head and down a bit, and , this is the most important, when you begin the upward movement you purposely allow your lats to start the motion, smoothly, though, not suddenly or herky jerky....

by letting the lats START the motion, but then finishing it with Triceps, you get past the weak link fulcrum point of the elbow....

trust me: doing them in this manner will be an enlightenment for you......

again: in this scenario, you are INTENTIONALLY LOOSENING UP THE FORM.

I think you wrong about "scull crushers" all way down behind head. I actually do that way as I do pull downs behind neck - because I have good shoulders flexibility. Most gays would not be capable do exercise in that way. They will fill sharp pain in shoulders.

DocHoss
02-03-2012, 04:28 PM
Most gays would not be capable do exercise in that way. They will fill sharp pain in shoulders.

Wow, I had no idea. Nature or nurture? :D

crupiea
02-03-2012, 05:36 PM
Using forearm bands every time I lift and avoiding exercises that really aggravate it.

http://www.amazon.com/Pro-Band-ABI00-Therapeutic-Forearm/dp/B000FML7SW/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1328147789&sr=8-1

I 100% agree with this.

no lifting for 8 months? Thats out of the question unless I get a transplant or something. even then its sketchy.

I had a bd case a year or so back. migrated to my left bicep but it stemmed from the elbow. it really hurt when I squatted, i think because of the funny torque on the elbow. Hurt so bad It would bring tears to my eyes. i had to ice it ebetween every set.

But the things is, i did every set. it hurt sure but i still did it.

i found that tennis elbow strap thing and right away ot was better. No more icing or motrin. I wore it for about 2 weeks 24/7 until it started to bug me. thats your bodies way of telling you you are better.

i liked it so much io bough one for the other arm just in case.

They make decent wrist wraps for benching too. i use them for all sorts of stuff.

JOHN GARGANI
02-04-2012, 11:50 AM
I found something online that seems to be what you are talking about. Maybe critique any parts of the video that you'd change (exercise we are talking about starts @ 1:10)

LVqdtjlzJWQ


sort of.....I don't see the need to stick the arms out at a slant as they do in the lying extensions: by doing that, you are NOW PUTTING STRESS ON THE SHOULDER JOINT, as you are violating the laws of center of gravity...

you can bring the bar straight overhead when doing this, with mind muscle connection, your triceps will take over after the initial assist from the lats.

keyboardworkout
02-04-2012, 12:20 PM
Ripp gives a good explanation of the lying triceps extension in this video and why the shoulder should be involved (triceps is biarticular, crosses two joints).

http://startingstrength.com/index.php/site/platform_the_lying_triceps_extension

bbsitum
02-04-2012, 07:20 PM
Ripp gives a good explanation of the lying triceps extension in this video and why the shoulder should be involved (triceps is biarticular, crosses two joints).

http://startingstrength.com/index.php/site/platform_the_lying_triceps_extension

Thanks for link. Very good post.

MrDogBiscuit
02-04-2012, 09:54 PM
Lots of good advice here.

I stick a blue ice bag under an elbow brace.

If its bothering me, I also sleep with a compression sleeve on so it doesn't puff up and get painful in the night.

danmanxx
05-18-2012, 02:05 AM
try being a pc gamer... You will then learn TRUE tennis elbow. the constant static loading movement rapes your tendons. rofl

mtpockets
05-18-2012, 04:29 AM
Great thread.

jdtemple
05-18-2012, 06:32 AM
SNORK: strict skull crushers, as many do them, are HELL to the elbow joint: the problem, is that you are using the elbow joint ALONE as a fulcrum, and it is simply too much stress on such a joint.

the solution is simple: you must do LYING TRICEPS EXTENSIONS, which is a variation of skull crushers, but here, you allow the bar to go BEHIND your head and down a bit, and , this is the most important, when you begin the upward movement you purposely allow your lats to start the motion, smoothly, though, not suddenly or herky jerky....

by letting the lats START the motion, but then finishing it with Triceps, you get past the weak link fulcrum point of the elbow....

trust me: doing them in this manner will be an enlightenment for you......

again: in this scenario, you are INTENTIONALLY LOOSENING UP THE FORM.I switched from skull crushers to these and my elbows are much happier. I also switched from an EZ curl bar to a Super EZ curl bar for the exercise, bringing my grip closer together and rotating my wrists some more. Again, happy elbows are happy.


Using forearm bands every time I lift and avoiding exercises that really aggravate it.

http://www.amazon.com/Pro-Band-ABI00-Therapeutic-Forearm/dp/B000FML7SW/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1328147789&sr=8-1I recently started wearing these as well, and I use Versagripps for a lot more exercises than I used to. Those arm bands don't look like they do much, but they work! They also save your skin in a motorcycle wreck, as I had the misfortune of finding out recently.

TXBuddy
05-18-2012, 07:36 AM
I have been self-rehabbing mild Bursitis (students elbow) for about 6 weeks now. I had to give up skull crushers and french press (seated, 2 hands one DB overhead). Now I just do the weighted dip cybex machine and cables. After researchin, I found a small article that discusses the amount of additional tension on the elbow ligaments when you go beyond 90 degrees at the elbow joint, it was something like 3x the amount of pressure. this explains why some exercises have been working for me versus others. The 2 that I gave up were taking my elbows to 45deg (if a straight arm is 180), weighted dips and cable exercises can be stopped at 90. I still pay attention to pressing exercises and try to go as deep as possible without taxing the elbow.
I know you may have a different elbow strain, but it is something to consider .

Black Sunday
05-18-2012, 07:39 AM
Voodoo :)

Saw these the other day. Might try it if I come down with it again. I've been pretty careful avoiding the stuff that irritates it. Pendlay link is the short version and tells you how to make the bands out of a tire tube. Kelly Starrett showed him the technique, lots of big words ;) I threw in the knees as well.


http://glennpendlay.wordpress.com/2012/02/17/got-tendonitis/


GZG_9O_mAgM&feature


-RYMV0salw8&feature

shiv68
05-26-2012, 10:03 PM
Read lots of responses on powerlifting forums about how great Thera-Band Flexbars are.

zB3TVb8a5mk. These helped reduce the pain in both my elbows that have been hurting for the past year. I used them for a couple of weeks recently before I misplaced them during a move. Been back to using them for the last three days.

STEELCITYMUSCLE
05-26-2012, 11:27 PM
I have a case of tennis elbow that has developed over the last year, most likely from a combination of training and my job...I wear one of those tennis elbow band braces at work and it seems to help a bit.

cockywop
05-27-2012, 07:37 AM
8 months is plenty long enough for it to have recovered. Look into MYOTHERAPY aka TRIGGER POINT THERAPY.
Do a websearch for Bonnie Prudden - simple, effective, and you can do it yourself at home. Good luck


ATTENTION This is the correct answer.

cockywop
05-27-2012, 07:39 AM
In the traditional medical view, tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis) and golfer’s elbow are forms of tendinitis. The presumption is that the tendons around your elbow have suffered microscopic tears through injury or overuse.

Unfortunately, the term “tendinitis” has become a virtual synonym for pain. Even an official medical diagnosis of tendinitis or epicondylitis is often based on no more evidence than your statement that your elbow hurts.

A Contrary View

This long-standing conventional medical mindset is disputed by Doctors Janet Travell and David Simons in their widely acclaimed medical textbook, Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual.

Extensive research by Travell and Simons has shown that myofascial trigger points (tiny contraction knots) in overworked or traumatized forearm muscles, not tendinitis, are the primary cause of pain in the elbow.



More info here

http://www.triggerpointbook.com/tennisel.htm

shiv68
05-27-2012, 11:04 AM
I have a case of tennis elbow that has developed over the last year, most likely from a combination of training and my job...I wear one of those tennis elbow band braces at work and it seems to help a bit.
I am not sure what brand of elbow brace you are using but I like and have been using, "Band-it". Along with using the Thera-BandŽ FlexBarŽ I have made a lot of progress. Right now my elbows just get slightly sore.
Being that your problem is a chronic one, heat would help some too. I bought a heating pad, "Softheat" from Walmart for about 15 dollars.

Also been using supplements with very minor success. Fish oil, Msm, Glucosamine, etc. I recently bought some USP Labs Super Cissus Rx. I have only been taking it for about four days but I have read a lot of good things about it and hopefully it lives up to the hype.

If the USP Labs Super Cissus Rx works well I would like to try it in combination with Animal Flex™.

bigvin73
05-27-2012, 01:42 PM
Well, its been 8 months since injuring my elbow (overuse) and therefore no lifting. Its finally feeling better but there's no way to put a date on when to start working out other than just letting pain be your guide. Anyone out there go thru a similar thing? I've rested it (patience is a virtue) and do not want to re-injure so the plan is to baby step it back into use. Wondering how long it will take, certain exercises to loosen it up, that kind of thing.

Just comming off almost 2 years of that problem think it was from kicking up to heavy dum bells. I tried to come back a few times but ended up hurt again relatively fast. My first two weeks back was very touchy lot of experimenting with what grips for pulling/pushing which exercises I can or can't do. I've had to make a lot of changes and I'm not able to train te same way I'd like to but it's working itself back. I use neoprene sleeves on them now and for heavy lifts I go to Inzer elbow wraps. I can't do certain things deadliftings out to much pull on my elbows and have to stay with bars for pressing and dumbells for bicep work but at least I'll never be the tool curling in the squat rack lol. Just hang in bud time helps and when you go back leave the ego at the door. My ego has to be the hardest part to keep in check. Going from one of the "big boys" to working myself back into shape has been te biggest thing for me to adjust to

ibidu1
05-27-2012, 04:12 PM
I used to have really bad elbow pain, to the point I had to wrap my elbows and grind my teeth when doing skull crushers. Lately ive been drinking almost a gallon of milk. The joint pains all seem to have disappeared, maybe my body was lacking calcium. Maybe try upping calcium intake or drink milk see if that changes anything.

Frnkd
05-27-2012, 05:25 PM
Going through it myself...experienced on my right arm several years ago, that didnt last long, couple of weeks, after I treated it with the band. Now I have it on my left...and this I attribute to lifting incorrectly, started with my wrist. sent to see a sport medicine md. Prescribed a writs band. I guess in between follow up visit, I compensated for that injury and did it to my muscle in my arm...go tennis elbow. Dr. recommended the band also and anti-inflammatory drug- asprin or similar. Anyway, I can only say....my legs are getting a better workout.

I have to take it easy on db and do only what I can and watch my form....one sign of pain and I stop or check my form. I am learning what angle and kind of equipment I can use to get the same results...and there are many. Just got to change with the situation.

Bando
05-28-2012, 08:13 PM
I used to have really bad elbow pain, to the point I had to wrap my elbows and grind my teeth when doing skull crushers. Lately ive been drinking almost a gallon of milk. The joint pains all seem to have disappeared, maybe my body was lacking calcium. Maybe try upping calcium intake or drink milk see if that changes anything.

Milk: It does a body good.

:rolleyes:

flyingeek
05-29-2012, 12:48 AM
Well, its been 8 months since injuring my elbow (overuse) and therefore no lifting. Its finally feeling better but there's no way to put a date on when to start working out other than just letting pain be your guide. Anyone out there go thru a similar thing? I've rested it (patience is a virtue) and do not want to re-injure so the plan is to baby step it back into use. Wondering how long it will take, certain exercises to loosen it up, that kind of thing.

Noob here.. hi:-)

I am 48 yo and have worked out all my life. Have been sitting out for about 6 months due to tendinitis not only in my elbow but in my shoulder as well. On top of that, I had a pinched nerve in my elbow and 2 ribs that did not want to stay in place. all of that was due to ignoring pain while working out/over load for months and months. Eventually it got so bad I could do nothing, especially the ribs prohibited me to breath correctly while working out.

I took a breather for 6 months and had PT for 24 sessions to get it corrected. What I learned from this is, listen to your body/PT really helps and unfortunately, rest might be what you must do. I hated every minute of it.

Unfortunately, I took advantage of the rest and stopped my clean eating. Oops.

I am 5'4", 119 lb.

I started my work-out again 6 weeks ago, slowly but surely and am up in normal work-out mode as of one week, albeit it will probably be a while before I can do 45 lb bent over dumbbell rows and dead-lift 130 lb.

I went up to 27% BF on my hiatus (:-() but in the 6 weeks I have done so far, I have dropped to 23%!!! (weight remains the same).


But back on topic, physical therapy was a savior for me, really. I have a tendency to ignore pain and my therapist really drove it home to rest and lower the weights. No short cuts, it has to be done.

NozzaC
05-29-2012, 02:17 AM
I cured a nasty case of tennis elbow using eccentric exercise. I cannot post links but if you plug "Eccentric Wrist Extensors exercise for TENNIS ELBOW" into youtube you'll find the protocol. You can use bands too. Personally I found it better to lay the forearm over a table with the wrist (palm down) hanging over the side and then hold a sock full of small weights. You lift the weights up with your free hand and lower with the affected hand. I.e. the affected arm only does eccentric movement when loaded. Then afterwards you do stretches (youtube "Tennis Elbow: Relief with 2 Physiotherapy Stretches"). There is a reasonable body of research to support eccentric rehab of tendonitis if you care to google scholar it.

I combined this with a forearm strap to take the strain off the tendon during the day, although you shouldn't wear it during the exercises.

The combination worked amazingly well and much better than the previous physio I had. Ii could feel it working within days and a month and and half later it was gone completely.

BloodySalad
06-01-2012, 06:20 AM
the solution is simple: you must do LYING TRICEPS EXTENSIONS



Suffering from a bit of elbow pain myself, I took John's advice and substituted these for Skull-crushers this morning.
I have to say that they worked perfectly. Ordinarily by now, I'd be feeling pain in my elbow but I've got no discomfort at all! I'll definitely be sticking with this exercise from now on.

Thanks John. :)

nlsecor
06-01-2012, 08:07 PM
SNORK: strict skull crushers, as many do them, are HELL to the elbow joint: the problem, is that you are using the elbow joint ALONE as a fulcrum, and it is simply too much stress on such a joint.

the solution is simple: you must do LYING TRICEPS EXTENSIONS, which is a variation of skull crushers, but here, you allow the bar to go BEHIND your head and down a bit, and , this is the most important, when you begin the upward movement you purposely allow your lats to start the motion, smoothly, though, not suddenly or herky jerky....

by letting the lats START the motion, but then finishing it with Triceps, you get past the weak link fulcrum point of the elbow....

trust me: doing them in this manner will be an enlightenment for you......

again: in this scenario, you are INTENTIONALLY LOOSENING UP THE FORM.

For those wanting a video of this, I believe the following video is an example.

http://www.musclehack.com/how-to-perform-french-curls-skull-crushers-correctly/

Whattheshizzle
06-08-2012, 05:58 PM
Huge, and I mean huge, shout out to Cockywop. Trigger point has been the answer for me! It will be almost a year now since grtting "tendonitis" and anyone wantinghelp should check out the link. Cissus only helped a little, resting was har dbut effective. The therabands hurt it even more (complete waste of $) and its really disapointing two doctors didn't know about tpt. Could've saved me like 10 monthes of pain!!!!!!
Also what bigvin said, being patient is a virtue and do not let the ego get in the way.
Do yourself a favor and try trigger point therapy. Lifting will begin soon...

shiv68
06-09-2012, 01:36 AM
Huge, and I mean huge, shout out to Cockywop. Trigger point has been the answer for me! It will be almost a year now since grtting "tendonitis" and anyone wantinghelp should check out the link. Cissus only helped a little, resting was har dbut effective. The therabands hurt it even more (complete waste of $) and its really disapointing two doctors didn't know about tpt. Could've saved me like 10 monthes of pain!!!!!!
Also what bigvin said, being patient is a virtue and do not let the ego get in the way.
Do yourself a favor and try trigger point therapy. Lifting will begin soon...

The therabands seemed to help me out and the cissus seems to be helping too. I am going to look into trigger point if my tendonitis starts acting up again.

Frnkd
06-09-2012, 04:20 AM
In the traditional medical view, tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis) and golfer’s elbow are forms of tendinitis. The presumption is that the tendons around your elbow have suffered microscopic tears through injury or overuse.

Unfortunately, the term “tendinitis” has become a virtual synonym for pain. Even an official medical diagnosis of tendinitis or epicondylitis is often based on no more evidence than your statement that your elbow hurts.

A Contrary View

This long-standing conventional medical mindset is disputed by Doctors Janet Travell and David Simons in their widely acclaimed medical textbook, Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual.

Extensive research by Travell and Simons has shown that myofascial trigger points (tiny contraction knots) in overworked or traumatized forearm muscles, not tendinitis, are the primary cause of pain in the elbow.



More info here

http://www.triggerpointbook.com/tennisel.htm

I've just done this and am amazed how just one self-treatment have alleviated much of the pain! I had it all the pain in the arm, the burning sensation in the elbow, and pain that extended to my hand.