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whitetail024
01-27-2012, 11:38 PM
Lets say I am benching 200lbs this week and my set/rep is 3/10-12. When I bench press my reps are now 15,13,10. Is that when i should up the weight? When my first set is getting above my max rep range? Or should I wait until I get over 12 reps with my last set?

What is a basic principal for how much weight to increase? 10% is what I thought I read somewhere....

tsoden
01-28-2012, 01:09 AM
Personally....if I can get 10 reps on my heaviest set, I know it's time to increase. Sometimes you can up it by 5 to 10 lbs just to see what you can do with it...you might surprise yourself

pastorgbc
01-28-2012, 03:07 AM
Lets say I am benching 200lbs this week and my set/rep is 3/10-12. When I bench press my reps are now 15,13,10. Is that when i should up the weight? When my first set is getting above my max rep range? Or should I wait until I get over 12 reps with my last set?

What is a basic principal for how much weight to increase? 10% is what I thought I read somewhere....

For what you are doing, I would up the weight on your compound movements (bench press, rows, squats, dead lifts, military press) each time you hit your target reps, For bench and military press, a good rule is to go up by five pounds; for squats, dead, and rows, go up by 10. Once you go up in weight, set goals for reps. If you do not reach those reps, do not reduce weight, but stay at that weight until you do.

Ray

hazto
01-28-2012, 04:10 AM
Also make sure when you hit your targeted reps, you did so with perfect form, do not add weight until your form is on target.

cmoore
01-28-2012, 05:17 AM
I dislocated my right shoulder 2 years ago and the last year I did well on my own made up "twelves rule". When I could do 3sets of 12 of a given weight cleanly for two workouts I go up 10 (once I hit 225 I added occasional 5rep max to my routine).The higher rep requirement gave my stabilizers more time to catch up and my shoulder pain is nil. Since last March I went from a shoulder limited and uncomfortable 3 sets of135x12 to a current 3 sets of 245x12reps. Two Fridays ago, I tested my shoulder pretty much for the first time and cleared 315x2 with no pain or problem. When I hit 255x12 for 3 I'll shoot for a new 1rm then.

Fwiw I'm not benching a ton of volume. My last chest day is typical lately:
Bar x25
135x12
185x12
225x12
245x12* (3sets)
*if I do a 5 rep then the 3set goes 245x12, 285x5, 245x whatevers left.

30degree incline dumbells:
105 dbells x12
105 dbell x11
105 dbell x8 (goal being 3sets of twelve but I'm not there yet)

I'm sure there are better programs but this has brought my shoulder strength back pain free and seems to solidly thump my chest. HTH.

Whatever you do please update the thread. I'll be interested to read what works for you.

Smokedduck
01-28-2012, 06:13 AM
I am by no means an expert, but i can tell you what people with a lot more experience and knowledge have told me. "Once you hit your rep range, and your not in failure, its time to go heavier." Also like Hazto stated, You need good form also, bad form you can injure yourself and your not receiving the benefits. Ray Lewis said (i love this and now go by it), "I don't train for a sport and I don't train to a number of reps," he says. "I train to failure."

-=FLEX=-
01-28-2012, 08:16 AM
Lets say I am benching 200lbs this week and my set/rep is 3/10-12. When I bench press my reps are now 15,13,10. Is that when i should up the weight? When my first set is getting above my max rep range? Or should I wait until I get over 12 reps with my last set?

What is a basic principal for how much weight to increase? 10% is what I thought I read somewhere....

When you are able to get your target number of reps across your target number of sets it's time to increase the weight.

Increase it enough that it busts you back down a few reps; then work towards getting your sets across again. When you get there, increase the weight, rinse and repeat.

ironwill2008
01-28-2012, 09:00 AM
When you are able to get your target number of reps across your target number of sets it's time to increase the weight.

Increase it enough that it busts you back down a few reps; then work towards getting your sets across again. When you get there, increase the weight, rinse and repeat.

^^^^This.

Here's an example of how to set up and run a simple "Sets-Across" progression scheme:

With your 200 pound load, after warmup sets, try to hit 200x12 on all 3 sets. No need to go higher that your rep target (12) on any set. If you're successful at hitting all 12 reps on all 3 sets, the next time this exercise comes up in your routine (next week or whatever), add 10 pounds to the bar (or as much weight as you think will drop you back to about 10 reps), and try to hit 210x12 across all 3 sets. If you can do so, next workout with this exercise, add another 10 pounds, and work for your 12 reps-across all 3 sets. If you get all your reps, add weight the next time. If you miss your 12 reps on any of the 3 sets, stay at the same working weight for the following workout and all subsequent workouts until you hit your reps-across. At this point, add weight the following workout, and so on.



As far as how much weight to add to the bar after you've hit your reps-across, it's arbitrary; just use your best estimate for how much to increase, and see how you do on the first of your 3 work sets. If you can't even get 10 reps, it's probably a little too heavy, and the best move will be to reduce a little.


Above all, always use good form. Don't sacrifice form just to get an extra rep. Doing so will only move the stress away from the target muscle at best, and will injure you at worst.

doinmiabs
01-28-2012, 09:30 AM
When you are able to get your target number of reps across your target number of sets it's time to increase the weight.

Increase it enough that it busts you back down a few reps; then work towards getting your sets across again. When you get there, increase the weight, rinse and repeat.

Yep..this is your answer right here. Personally: 8 reps reached...time to increase the weight.

hlydon
01-28-2012, 11:12 AM
I generally don't go a week without increasing weight for at least one set. The main reason is while you take a week or two contemplating whether you are strong enough to add more weight, you could have already added weight and become stronger. Make your body adapt to the weight. I don't favor adapting by doing reps. That just doesn't get me as strong as fast.

I do five sets of a specific number of reps for about six weeks i.e. 5 reps each set. Then I switch to 7 reps or whatever for six weeks. I increase weight on at least one set each week. Here is a hypothetical example.

set 1 set 2 set 3 set 4 set 5
week 1 200 210 220 230 240
week 2 205 210 220 230 240
week 3 205 215 220 230 240
week 4 205 215 225 230 240
week 5 205 215 225 235 240
week 6 205 215 225 235 245

If for some reason I get more than five reps on the last set, I jump ahead a week or two the next time. If I don't get five reps, generally I just had a bad day. Not getting five reps on the last set for two or more weeks usually means I need a break or I need to readjust my plan.

JerryB
01-28-2012, 11:45 PM
The obvious basic rule of the thump is I increase the weight when the degree of effort is not as challenging as anticipated. I have a set of fractional plates so I can increase the poundage in increments as small as half a pound. I do not adhere to a fixed percent of a weight increase. The increase is determined by gut feeling.