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View Full Version : s****osis and lifting



brahnnosaurusrex
01-26-2012, 04:59 PM
hey guys and girls, posting here because my doctor said this was rare at my age and i wanna hear some real life experiences as to how this has affected your workouts.

have had low back pain (SI area both sides but usually right) for years now since i rotated my pelvis doing deadlifts when i was 19ish

lately its been quite chronic and i gave up on getting relief from chiropractor and decided i had enough. so i got some xrays done and it came back with mild s****osis leading to one or both SI joint pain.

im going to start physio and have been put on anti inflammatorys for the month

people who have suffered from this before, does it get better? it affects every facet of my waking life - and sleep doesnt help much as when its bad the smallest movement wakes me up. not to mention i havent been to the gym in weeks.

thanks

brahnnosaurusrex
01-27-2012, 09:47 AM
bump

bigtallox
01-27-2012, 10:33 AM
people who have suffered from this before, does it get better? it affects every facet of my waking life - and sleep doesnt help much as when its bad the smallest movement wakes me up. not to mention i havent been to the gym in weeks.


I have s****osis. I was diagnosed with it in about 6th grade after the school did a screening on all the kids in the school in PE class. At the time they only x-rayed my spin every 6 months or so until I stopped growing when I was 17. At that point the dr said I'd be about 1.5" taller if my spin was straight. It never really bothered me as a kid, but it's part of the reason why my parents wouldnt' let me play sports in high school. In my late 20's early 30's it started bothering me, I had achy pain it wasn't sever but it was pretty much constantly there. I was told by doctors to not squat, deadlift or lift heavy weights, so I didn't for YEARS. About 4 years ago I ended up going to a chiropractor ( not my current one that sponsors my strongman efforts ) and he basically said that deadlifting/squatting would be good for it, so I started training with the local powerlifting crew. 3 months after I started deadlifting, the achy pain that I had for years stopped and it hasn't come back. I'm convinced my spine has less curvature now, my head hits doorways in my house that it didn't before ( even barefoot ), and when I had a chest x-ray ( because I had the flu and some lung congestion ) I had to tell the x-ray tech that I had s****osis, i.e. she couldn't really tell from the x-ray.



lately its been quite chronic and i gave up on getting relief from chiropractor and decided i had enough. so i got some xrays done and it came back with mild s****osis leading to one or both SI joint pain.


A good chiropractor should do x-rays. I'm a big fan of my chiropractor, both my current one and the one that said I should squat and deadlift, if I wasn't for him I wouldn't be competing in strongman and I'm sure my pain would be even worse than before. But now my back is strong, here's a deadlift from last night, 500 pounds double overhand grip, no straps, no wraps, no belt, no powerlifting suit, completely raw, just me and my s****osis spin...

5fxRFoVkj0o


Good luck.

DocTats
01-27-2012, 12:51 PM
Powerlifter Lamar Gant had s****osis and he deadlifted like 5X his weight. I remember a SI article on him in the 80's and they showed an x-ray of his spine and it was wicked. Of course, not saying you should go out and powerlift but you know, you never know what can be achieved with the right treatment

PSVqlh7ePb8

tpuhl
01-27-2012, 01:10 PM
One thing you can look into is a PT or PTA who specialized in MFR therapy. I blew my back out and actually herniated or bulged 9 discks. They wanted to do surgery and load me with pills but I went strict form Got MFR (myfascialrelease) therapy and I am in no pain. The body is an amazing thing and if you get the right therapy you will be fine.

Hope it works out for ya

Donkeyno9
01-27-2012, 05:59 PM
Powerlifter Lamar Gant had s****osis and he deadlifted like 5X his weight. I remember a SI article on him in the 80's and they showed an x-ray of his spine and it was wicked. Of course, not saying you should go out and powerlift but you know, you never know what can be achieved with the right treatment

PSVqlh7ePb8
^^That was the first thing that popped into my mind.
I have s****osis due to having femurs of unequal length. I wear a 3/8" lift in one shoe. All it means for me is a slight mechanical disadvantage squatting and a slight advantage deadlifting. Lifting has entirely cured all my back pain.

Kodokan
01-27-2012, 06:24 PM
i don't have s****osis, but have had a hell of a time with a herniated disc in the past. you mention something about rotating your pelvis doing some deadlifts when you were younger...is it possible that you had a injury and herniated a disc, possibly badly? did you ever get an MRI or a conclusive diagnosis for your problem?

there's a variety of really terrible things that can affect your low back, and all I would suggest is make really sure what the problem is before coming up with a treatment plan. that and don't give up and get to 100% pain free, but be prepared to make significant changes in the short term in order to get there.

i don't think it's insignificant if your back pain started with a deadlift incident. you don't get s****osis from deadlifts, but you may get herniated disc and long lasting back pain, plus easily recurring injury to the disc which may seem like it never really goes away if it doesn't heal the best it could.

this is all not to say that you don't have s****osis and it's not an issue...but any kind of chronic back problem is a real life problem that affects so many facets of your life, you gotta consider everything and especially important is when it started.

cmoore
01-29-2012, 05:41 AM
Tough to answer your question too specifically without more information. What level is your s****osis? What kind (single curve, double)? Your curve type, severity (angle), apical vertebrae, and curve flexibility will define your mechanical limitations more specifically.

That being said most idiopathic s**** patients can lift weights without major complications. Again depending on your curve, there are often things can be done to help. Some curves benefit from therapy, braces, even sometimes something as simple as a shoe lift can make a huge difference. It depends on what drives/exacerbates your curvature.

No matter what, being relentless with stretching should be a major part of your routine (particularly your hip muscles as tight hips can drive all kinds of back deformity).

67fastback
01-29-2012, 12:27 PM
My mom has a very severe s****osis. Do nothing, and it can severely limit you.

I have it also (slight S curve) but there are important things you can do, to help.

1) Exercise
2) Strength training
And you are already doing those things, so you are well on your way to controlling it.

Since I started strength training, my s****osis has improved.
With my S curve, I concentrate on strengthening the weaker areas. For me low back Rside and upper back Lside.

Other important areas to concetrate on; abs, chest, pecs, lats.

3) get a qualified trainer to look at your movements, and try and improve them technically. Ie. of you are favouring your stronger side, try and work on being more technically correct.

4) Good chiro, as Big Tall Ox has said, can help with alignment
5) Good deep tissue massage therapist. My therapist relishes the infliction of pain, and removing scar tissue and adhesions in the back muscles, that are tight (helping direct the misalignment) and gives me feedback on my posture.

I'm not an expert on the big lifts, but am convinced that without exercise, I'd be in really bad shape right now. There are some youtube videos on stretching and soliosis exercises. I don't do them, but kind of informative.

Good thread