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CaptnC
01-26-2012, 02:48 PM
When you've had a good workout? I had been under the misunderstanding (from reading another thread) that when you had worked and pumped your muscle full of blood and they were tight; you had a good workout...So if that is not it...then what is?

I have read over a number of different work outs and 4 sets of 10 seems to be fairly common for a given exercise...so that is how I have structured my work outs. I use enough weight so that the by the time I am finished (about an hour at the gym) which ever muscle group for the day is pretty tight.

Even though I see guys all the time hammering away doing the same exercise the whole time I'm at the gym. These dudes look pretty good too. I've been thinking I was the smarter of the two of us?!?!?!?

So tell me how do I know when I've had a good work out?

Remember...I've only been at this a year...

llahhsoj
01-26-2012, 03:15 PM
I don't know what to say really. Just do what works for you. It is good to switch your routine every couple of week also. Keep up the good work!

Stoked
01-26-2012, 03:31 PM
For me, the pump is part of it, but also how I feel when I'm done. Do I feel like I made progress or was I just "going through the motions."

Guff
01-26-2012, 03:38 PM
When you can't do no mo


Then you're done

-=FLEX=-
01-26-2012, 03:40 PM
When I accomplished what I set out to, which usually means lifting more weight or cranking out more reps than last week's workout.

pharmamarketer
01-26-2012, 03:42 PM
When I know I gave 100%. I don't need to break PRs in order to have a good workout.

CookAndrewB
01-26-2012, 05:18 PM
For any given workout I have a goal. Whatever that goal is, if I hit that mark... good workout. That goal may not be more weight or more reps, it might be tightening up form, it might be smoothly transitioning through a sticking point, it might be bar speed, it might simply be to hit my numbers and NOT wear myself out.

The other side of this is that "good" workouts are something that I judge in hindsight the following week, the following month, etc. Did the workouts I've been doing help push me towards some performance goal? If not, then it wouldn't matter how they felt, something would need to change. To this end, I strongly encourage anyone to keep a detailed training journal so you can look back and do some sort of analysis about your progress and success.

Sometimes my training doesn't "feel" like much, in the moment. I may feel like I didn't work hard for a given day, or I may walk out of the gym with a lot of energy. I don't start slapping more stuff on until I can see if I'm making my goals. If I am, then I see no reason to worry about some easy days. Progress isn't always gained through grining yourself into the dirt, contrary to what the hardcore crowd will espouse.

mslman71
01-26-2012, 05:45 PM
When I accomplished what I set out to, which usually means lifting more weight or cranking out more reps than last week's workout.

This.

In addition, it takes a while to learn to interpret your body's feedback.

Iceman1800
01-27-2012, 02:22 AM
For me its how much the wife laughs at the way I'm moving when I'm done.

tsoden
01-27-2012, 02:45 AM
For me its how much the wife laughs at the way I'm moving when I'm done.Lol

Big_Sky_Guy
01-27-2012, 08:12 AM
We could all very easily go in and do 25 reps sets and pack the muscles with blood in 20-30 minutes and be done, but the amount of actual work done is sub-optimal.

I'll generalize...most people go in and tackle a major compound movement for strength purposes (sets of 3 or 5, sometimes 10's)
Then then go after 3-5 accessory movements which typically will be done in sets of 10 (typically)
The last sets of each accessory movement are where most people choose to do max reps and work for a good pump


Go check out the Journals to see what people are doing...

Strength ME day for me
BB Bench- work up to a max of 3
DB Bench- 3 sets of 12-15, with a max rep on last set
Face Pulls- 3 sets of 10 with max reps on last set (for me I am generally already spent by the 3rd set if I pick the right weight and can only get 8)
Tri OH Press- 3 sets of 10 just like face pulls
Pushups- 3 sets of max reps

bigtallox
01-27-2012, 08:37 AM
So tell me how do I know when I've had a good work out?


It's not something you immediately know after any given session. That's why it's important to be on a good program that's been designed by an expert and is consistent with your goals. You only know if you making progress OVER TIME. You never know if just one workout is moving you in the directions of your goals, it takes time.

whiskeytango76
01-27-2012, 09:21 AM
We could all very easily go in and do 25 reps sets and pack the muscles with blood in 20-30 minutes and be done, but the amount of actual work done is sub-optimal.

I'll generalize...most people go in and tackle a major compound movement for strength purposes (sets of 3 or 5, sometimes 10's)
Then then go after 3-5 accessory movements which typically will be done in sets of 10 (typically)
The last sets of each accessory movement are where most people choose to do max reps and work for a good pump


Go check out the Journals to see what people are doing...




^^this. Another way that I can tell is when I am done with leg day and can walk normal I have not worked hard enough. On upper body days, if I can pick up my three year old I know I did not work hard enough.

2nd_chance
01-27-2012, 09:38 AM
When you hear the Iron gods applaud... kinda srs

bigtallox
01-27-2012, 09:41 AM
When you hear the Iron gods applaud... kinda srs

Is that the same as seeing stars after a heavy squat or deadlift?

BrotherWolf
01-27-2012, 10:02 AM
When you've had a good workout?
a few ways to tell when you had a good one

when you lift more than the previous one .. a PR
when nose starts to bleed
when it's followed by vomit
when you hear baby Jesus yelling "good job bro"
when you get kicked out from the "all you can eat buffet"
when the big guys at the gym high five you after 50 reps squats
when you can't walk properly and it hurts to get into the car

these are just a few signs you had a good workout

BrotherWolf
01-27-2012, 10:08 AM
Is that the same as seeing stars after a heavy squat or deadlift?

^^^ and this

Guinea-pig
01-27-2012, 10:12 AM
For any given workout I have a goal. Whatever that goal is, if I hit that mark... good workout. That goal may not be more weight or more reps, it might be tightening up form, it might be smoothly transitioning through a sticking point, it might be bar speed, it might simply be to hit my numbers and NOT wear myself out.

The other side of this is that "good" workouts are something that I judge in hindsight the following week, the following month, etc. Did the workouts I've been doing help push me towards some performance goal? If not, then it wouldn't matter how they felt, something would need to change. To this end, I strongly encourage anyone to keep a detailed training journal so you can look back and do some sort of analysis about your progress and success.

Sometimes my training doesn't "feel" like much, in the moment. I may feel like I didn't work hard for a given day, or I may walk out of the gym with a lot of energy. I don't start slapping more stuff on until I can see if I'm making my goals. If I am, then I see no reason to worry about some easy days. Progress isn't always gained through grining yourself into the dirt, contrary to what the hardcore crowd will espouse.

Who are you? (on spread)

netopia
01-27-2012, 10:17 AM
Any session that resulted in progress towards my goals (more weight lifted usually) is a good session.

JOHN GARGANI
01-27-2012, 12:05 PM
For any given workout I have a goal. Whatever that goal is, if I hit that mark... good workout. That goal may not be more weight or more reps, it might be tightening up form, it might be smoothly transitioning through a sticking point, it might be bar speed, it might simply be to hit my numbers and NOT wear myself out.

The other side of this is that "good" workouts are something that I judge in hindsight the following week, the following month, etc. Did the workouts I've been doing help push me towards some performance goal? If not, then it wouldn't matter how they felt, something would need to change. To this end, I strongly encourage anyone to keep a detailed training journal so you can look back and do some sort of analysis about your progress and success.

Sometimes my training doesn't "feel" like much, in the moment. I may feel like I didn't work hard for a given day, or I may walk out of the gym with a lot of energy. I don't start slapping more stuff on until I can see if I'm making my goals. If I am, then I see no reason to worry about some easy days. Progress isn't always gained through grining yourself into the dirt, contrary to what the hardcore crowd will espouse.


simply EXCELLENT....also, on spread for you...

ironwill2008
01-27-2012, 12:09 PM
simply EXCELLENT....also, on spread for you...

This time, you beat me to the punch, John.

Mr. CookAndrewB has a lot of common sense in him.

CaptnC
01-27-2012, 01:49 PM
OK...if muscle growth is slow...I can't see would it be possible to lift more from one week to the next...unless your talking one or two pounds...I'm sure I can't add a small plate (5lb) week after week on any one exercise. I'm weak on math, but if your adding weight every week, you guys who have been working out for years SUCK! I've seen a number of long timers curling 45lb DB...I've been doing 40lb DB for a while. Most of you long time lifters should all be BP over 300lbs. When I started one year ago I struggled with 140lbs on BP. Last night I did my 5X5 at 210lb...last three sets I pressed out a 6th rep just to see if I could. I was at 210lb on BP before a long break for the holidays in DEC. but I'm back and felt pretty strong after 5 sets on BP.


I seems from some of the response I guess I've had a few good work outs. Most shoulder/bicep day I can only splash water on face before I leave the gym...my hands won't reach. And a couple legs days I looked like a drunk leaving the gym. I have seen stars a few times doing squats and wondered if my face was about to meet the floor.

I'm still a BIG TIME rookie and green as hell at this whole thing...

Thanks for all the replies...rep everyone! Yeah...even the smart ***'s :) EDIT: didn't get everyone...got'a wait 24 hours...but I'll get ya!

chodan9
01-27-2012, 01:59 PM
I have enjoyed every f'king workout since I started 6 years ago.
That said, you cant gauge your fitness/bodybuilding progress on a workout by workout.
You cant rely on pump, as it is as dependent on diet as training.
Where as you can get consistent strength growth over time its not always linear so you cant always beat last weeks reps.
but when your done can you answer the question "did I come in and give it my all? "did I try to bust my ass even though the results may not have been to my liking?" "did I have a good time training?"
if you answer to your satisfaction then you just had a good workout.

BrotherWolf
01-27-2012, 02:14 PM
OK...if muscle growth is slow...I can't see would it be possible to lift more from one week to the next...unless your talking one or two pounds...I'm sure I can't add a small plate (5lb) week after week on any one exercise. I'm weak on math, but if your adding weight every week, you guys who have been working out for years SUCK! I've seen a number of long timers curling 45lb DB...I've been doing 40lb DB for a while. Most of you long time lifters should all be BP over 300lbs. When I started one year ago I struggled with 140lbs on BP. Last night I did my 5X5 at 210lb...last three sets I pressed out a 6th rep just to see if I could. I was at 210lb on BP before a long break for the holidays in DEC. but I'm back and felt pretty strong after 5 sets on BP.


I seems from some of the response I guess I've had a few good work outs. Most shoulder/bicep day I can only splash water on face before I leave the gym...my hands won't reach. And a couple legs days I looked like a drunk leaving the gym. I have seen stars a few times doing squats and wondered if my face was about to meet the floor.

I'm still a BIG TIME rookie and green as hell at this whole thing...

Thanks for all the replies...rep everyone! Yeah...even the smart ***'s :) EDIT: didn't get everyone...got'a wait 24 hours...but I'll get ya!

put it this way if you as a novice can't add 5-10lb to your compound lifts .. (DL and Squat) every week, you're doing it wrong
that is called linear progression , and it will work for as long as you are still a novice after that it's a completely different kind of progression but you should still be able to add weight to the bar for a while , the frequency might not be the same because as we get closer to out genetic potential (most people never do) the programming needs to change

CookAndrewB
01-27-2012, 02:21 PM
Who are you? (on spread)

I feel like this is a trick question. :confused:

... I also feel the urge to reply "I'm Batman"

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/3/38/MikeandJack.jpg/210px-MikeandJack.jpg


simply EXCELLENT....also, on spread for you...

This is a topic that I've given a lot of thought to, over the past 3-4 years. The older you get, the less shenanigans your body will put up with before you A) get injured B) make no progress because you are injured C) Make no progress because you aren't a bubbling cauldron of hormones literally able to do nearly anything and make progress because... that's what puberty is meant for, not your mid 30's ;)


This time, you beat me to the punch, John.

Mr. CookAndrewB has a lot of common sense in him.

Awwww, that's just about the nicest thing that anyone could say. It is a rare commodity, it would seem.


I'm weak on math, but if your adding weight every week, you guys who have been working out for years SUCK!

This made me laugh. Gains, muscular/CNS adaptation are always operating under the law of diminishing returns. Progress immediately ramps up quickly in the beginning as you take advantage of the "n00b gains" but quickly starts to taper off, until you start to be rather pleased with a 5-10lb increase in a given year, nevermind that "5lbs/session" stuff a beginner can get away with. Most people's luke warm desire to achieve, coupled with a craptastic diet and virtually no training plan, mean that you can do an awful lot of work without coming anywhere close to your potential (call that genetics, if you will). As I frequently tell my boy, the amount of work to do a really bad job is often equal to the amount of work to do a good job. In terms of training, that is why you see people "work their arse off" for years and they still look like a bag of smashed rats. They haven't figured out (and may never) that hard work is of little consequence if you don't really know what you are doing.

Kraken
01-27-2012, 02:26 PM
CookAndrew hit a point I was going to make. A lot of times I don't know if I Had a good workout until the following week or following month.

Sometimes I know I had a good workout because I didn't get injured. xD

Things I DON'T use as a gauge of a good workout, pump and/or soreness the following day or through out the week. Sometimes I am sore, other times I am not, sometimes I have a pump, and sometimes I don't. There are some muscle groups that are almost always pumped (Tris and bis) and others that aren't pumped often (Back and chest), but the latter can be sore the next day, even without a pump, so this is an indicator to me that pump and/or soreness aren't reliable gauges.