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Mogambo
01-20-2012, 04:58 PM
i've read about how soda is acidic. can drinking it with say a steak effect how your body digests the protein in it?

probably a silly question. just curious.

TomBremner
01-20-2012, 05:00 PM
you sir are correct, that is a silly question. soda is no where near as acidic ad stomach acid. your overthinking little things.

Mogambo
01-20-2012, 05:07 PM
yea i just wanted some confirmation that i was over thinking it. thanks.

rhizome
01-20-2012, 05:16 PM
i've read about how soda is acidic. can drinking it with say a steak effect how your body digests the protein in it?

probably a silly question. just curious.

This is actually a very good question. Most soda contains chemicals that form 1,4 butyl-isopeptyl hydrogen bonds with amino acids with acidic and basic side chains. This in effect coats the protein and prevents proteolytic enzyme access. But get this, if you slather your steak with a bottle of ketchup or KC masterpiece BBQ sauce like Ronnie Coleman does, you can prevent this inhibition from occurring and allow the dilutional effect and mixing to run its course. Ronnie was definitely on to something. No wonder he's so ****ing swole.

braggable
01-20-2012, 05:23 PM
This is actually a very good question. Most soda contains chemicals that form 1,4 butyl-isopeptyl hydrogen bonds with amino acids with acidic and basic side chains. This in effect coats the protein and prevents proteolytic enzyme access. But get this, if you slather your steak with a bottle of ketchup or KC masterpiece BBQ sauce like Ronnie Coleman does, you can prevent this inhibition from occurring and allow the dilutional effect and mixing to run its course. Ronnie was definitely on to something. No wonder he's so ****ing swole.

can you please post a peer-reviewed journal to back up your claim.

just the abstract will be fine. I dont actually read the whole paper.

TomBremner
01-20-2012, 05:28 PM
This is actually a very good question. Most soda contains chemicals that form 1,4 butyl-isopeptyl hydrogen bonds with amino acids with acidic and basic side chains. This in effect coats the protein and prevents proteolytic enzyme access. But get this, if you slather your steak with a bottle of ketchup or KC masterpiece BBQ sauce like Ronnie Coleman does, you can prevent this inhibition from occurring and allow the dilutional effect and mixing to run its course. Ronnie was definitely on to something. No wonder he's so ****ing swole.
im gonna be honest, you lost me.

oh and im sure its the ketchup and not the cell tech.

BookMonkey
01-20-2012, 05:50 PM
This is actually a very good question. Most soda contains chemicals that form 1,4 butyl-isopeptyl hydrogen bonds with amino acids with acidic and basic side chains. This in effect coats the protein and prevents proteolytic enzyme access. But get this, if you slather your steak with a bottle of ketchup or KC masterpiece BBQ sauce like Ronnie Coleman does, you can prevent this inhibition from occurring and allow the dilutional effect and mixing to run its course. Ronnie was definitely on to something. No wonder he's so ****ing swole.

bull****...

Your lack of biochemistry amuses me...but I shall let you continue...

rhizome
01-20-2012, 06:06 PM
bull****...

Your lack of biochemistry amuses me...but I shall let you continue...

I could go toe to toe with you on any biochem or physiology topic and absolutely mop the floor with you (srs).

rhizome
01-20-2012, 06:08 PM
can you please post a peer-reviewed journal to back up your claim.

just the abstract will be fine. I dont actually read the whole paper.

I think these before and after pictures provide unequivocal proof. How can you argue with that?


http://www.darkwoods.com/bodybuilder/men/bb/gallery/fullsize/colema02.jpg

http://forum.bodybuildingpro.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=2836&stc=1

http://www.shafatloss.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/10/ronnie-coleman.jpg

TomBremner
01-20-2012, 06:10 PM
I think these before and after pictures provide unequivocal proof. How can you argue with that?


http://www.darkwoods.com/bodybuilder/men/bb/gallery/fullsize/colema02.jpg

http://forum.bodybuildingpro.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=2836&stc=1

http://www.shafatloss.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/10/ronnie-coleman.jpgso your telling me ketchup did this??? im skeptical

Mogambo
01-20-2012, 06:17 PM
well i think i'm more confused now than before making this thread.

BookMonkey
01-20-2012, 06:22 PM
I could go toe to toe with you on any biochem or physiology topic and absolutely mop the floor with you (srs).

Bring it...

rhizome
01-20-2012, 06:26 PM
Bring it, troll...

Describe to me the "end replication problem" and explain why human telomeres shorten 50-200 bps per PD. You can google ranger your way to the first but you need to know a little something about DNA replication and how the G-tail is created to answer the latter. You have 2 minutes starting now.



EDIT: you fail as I expected

Answer: You can google "end replication problem" to educate yourself on that. Telomeres shorten more than what the "end replication problem" would predict due solely to failure to fully replicate the entire length of DNA because the C-strand is resected to create the resulting G-tail. You can redeem yourself if you can tell me the exo or endonuclease(s) that performs the resection.

lakerzfan07
01-20-2012, 06:44 PM
This is actually a very good question. Most soda contains chemicals that form 1,4 butyl-isopeptyl hydrogen bonds with amino acids with acidic and basic side chains. This in effect coats the protein and prevents proteolytic enzyme access. But get this, if you slather your steak with a bottle of ketchup or KC masterpiece BBQ sauce like Ronnie Coleman does, you can prevent this inhibition from occurring and allow the dilutional effect and mixing to run its course. Ronnie was definitely on to something. No wonder he's so ****ing swole.

So what you mean is if you want soda with your steak, but don't want to prevent proteolytic enzyme access you have to slather it with ketchup?

braggable
01-20-2012, 07:15 PM
Describe to me the "end replication problem" and explain why human telomeres shorten 50-200 bps per PD. You can google ranger your way to the first but you need to know a little something about DNA replication and how the G-tail is created to answer the latter. You have 2 minutes starting now.



EDIT: you fail as I expected

Answer: You can google "end replication problem" to educate yourself on that. Telomeres shorten more than what the "end replication problem" would predict due solely to failure to fully replicate the entire length of DNA because the C-strand is resected to create the resulting G-tail. You can redeem yourself if you can tell me the exo or endonuclease(s) that performs the resection.


Oh oh, can I play too?!

TRF1 and TRF2 are the presumed helicases (perhaps) that form the t-loops that wind the G-rich strand around the shorter C-rich strand. Are you talking about SIRT6?

rhizome
01-21-2012, 02:44 AM
Oh oh, can I play too?!

TRF1 and TRF2 are the presumed helicases (perhaps) that form the t-loops that wind the G-rich strand around the shorter C-rich strand. Are you talking about SIRT6?

TRF1 and TRF2 lack canonical helicase domains but they do associate with and activate Werner syndrome and Bloom syndrome helicases. TRF2 but not TRF1 can compact chromatin and induce supercoiling which produces torsional stress, unwinding and subsequent strand invasion to form the t-loop..

AlwaysTryin
01-21-2012, 02:54 AM
You guys just reminded me how much I hated my microbiology etc units. A,T,G,C strands and all the crap replication stuff and issues

Glad it's all done

t12jm
01-21-2012, 03:28 AM
TRF1 and TRF2 lack canonical helicase domains but they do associate with and activate Werner syndrome and Bloom syndrome helicases. TRF2 but not TRF1 can compact chromatin and induce supercoiling which produces torsional stress, unwinding and subsequent strand invasion to form the t-loop..

strong random topic.

skepticalhippo.jpg

methinks you may have selected your area of research/expertise...which would make your claim about mopping the floor with him on ANY topic a bit disingenuous, no?

you need an arbiter. What's that you ask? Why yes, yes I am free, and I'll gladly choose "any biochem or physiology topic" for the two of you to tussle over.

I'm thinking molecular genetics might not make my short list ^^

http://media.rhizome.org/blog/3637/01.jpg

ParsonBrown
01-21-2012, 04:41 AM
In all honesty...no one really cares about what happens when you drink one soda and eat a steak at the same time.

An empty calorie can of soda is not optimal for anyone, but if you want one drink it and move on with life. The stress you are creating worrying about this is probably going to give you more acid in your gut than a soda...

Don't consume cases of soda per day...use common sense and moderation...mop floor with this.

Also, I'm pretty sure Ronnie rode a bicycle every day along with the ketchup ;)

axxlef
01-21-2012, 05:24 AM
Just drink it the effect it will have on your meal will be at best minimal

synthetic
01-21-2012, 08:45 AM
Bone loss

In a meta-analysis of 88 studies, drinking soda correlates with a decrease in milk consumption along with the vitamin D, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, calcium, protein and other micronutrients. [32] Phosphorus, a micronutrient, can be found in cola-type beverages, but there may be a risk in consuming too much [33]. Phosphorus and calcium are used in the body to create calcium-phosphate, which is the main component of bone. However, the combination of too much phosphorus with too little calcium in the body can lead to a degeneration of bone mass [34].

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soft_drink

Mogambo
01-21-2012, 09:07 AM
Bone loss

In a meta-analysis of 88 studies, drinking soda correlates with a decrease in milk consumption along with the vitamin D, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, calcium, protein and other micronutrients. [32] Phosphorus, a micronutrient, can be found in cola-type beverages, but there may be a risk in consuming too much [33]. Phosphorus and calcium are used in the body to create calcium-phosphate, which is the main component of bone. However, the combination of too much phosphorus with too little calcium in the body can lead to a degeneration of bone mass [34].

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soft_drink

if i'm reading this right, soda in itself doesn't create bone loss. it's that when ppl drink more soda, they drink less milk and that's what creates bone loss.

ThatWei
01-21-2012, 09:10 AM
if i'm reading this right, soda in itself doesn't create bone loss. it's that when ppl drink more soda, they drink less milk and that's what creates bone loss.

http://fringebowlteamblog.com/images/the_rock_clap_clap_gif.gif

braggable
01-21-2012, 09:14 AM
TRF1 and TRF2 lack canonical helicase domains but they do associate with and activate Werner syndrome and Bloom syndrome helicases. TRF2 but not TRF1 can compact chromatin and induce supercoiling which produces torsional stress, unwinding and subsequent strand invasion to form the t-loop..


Yes sir. Thanks for the helicase clarification (srs). And while SIRT6 is associated with telomere regulation it is actually a histone deacetylase and not an exo/endonuease so I presume that's not the factor you initially had in mind.

footballpunter
01-21-2012, 09:22 AM
One soda is your daily amount of sugar

ThatWei
01-21-2012, 09:26 AM
One soda is your daily amount of sugar

http://images.yuku.com.s3.amazonaws.com/image/gif/82725b1e3c4d0bb3eeb3b3f743b9a4644881c4f.gif

Trigger543
01-21-2012, 12:06 PM
One soda is your daily amount of sugar

this is the first thing in this thread i understood.

pretty sure there's no "daily amount" of sugar...

t12jm
01-21-2012, 02:57 PM
Bone loss

In a meta-analysis of 88 studies, drinking soda correlates with a decrease in milk consumption along with the vitamin D, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, calcium, protein and other micronutrients. [32] Phosphorus, a micronutrient, can be found in cola-type beverages, but there may be a risk in consuming too much [33]. Phosphorus and calcium are used in the body to create calcium-phosphate, which is the main component of bone. However, the combination of too much phosphorus with too little calcium in the body can lead to a degeneration of bone mass [34].

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soft_drink

Saw "meta-analysis".
Expected crap.
Leaving satisfied.

illriginalized
01-21-2012, 03:09 PM
Stay away from soda.. That **** can be used as a toilet bowl cleaner. SRS.

Kahldris
01-21-2012, 03:13 PM
One soda is your daily amount of sugar

http://i.imgur.com/ASPpn.gif (http://imgur.com/ASPpn)

Kirra
01-22-2012, 05:36 AM
Stay away from soda.. That **** can be used as a toilet bowl cleaner. SRS.

And dihydrogen monoxide is used in both food industry and nuclear power plants.....

ErickStevens
01-22-2012, 05:48 AM
This thread =

http://cache.blippitt.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/Popcorn-11-Eddie-Griffin.gif

ebaum
01-22-2012, 06:15 AM
This is actually a very good question. Most soda contains chemicals that form 1,4 butyl-isopeptyl hydrogen bonds with amino acids with acidic and basic side chains. This in effect coats the protein and prevents proteolytic enzyme access. But get this, if you slather your steak with a bottle of ketchup or KC masterpiece BBQ sauce like Ronnie Coleman does, you can prevent this inhibition from occurring and allow the dilutional effect and mixing to run its course. Ronnie was definitely on to something. No wonder he's so ****ing swole.

If you're actually being serious could you please describe to me what a "1,4 butyl-isopeptyl hydrogen bond" is, what chemical(s) in the soda form these special type of hydrogen bonds and how they are different from hydrogen bonds with water. Your stomach/body in effect is an aqueous environment, so more often than not any substrate binding to any enzyme (especially proteins) need to overcome the free energy of solvation. If there were actually chemicals in soda that acted as protease inhibitors I might buy your argument. Also pls provide a source. Thanks.

t12jm
01-22-2012, 06:23 AM
And dihydrogen monoxide is used in both food industry and nuclear power plants.....

https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.dhmo.org%2Fmsds%2FMSDS-DHMO-Kemp.pdf

stay safe, friends.