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bodler
12-05-2011, 08:43 AM
I am doing a lot of research on this thing and finding out stuff saying that the real amount of carbs that will be digested is the amount after substracting fiber.

If that's the case.

The let's say I eat 100 grams of pasta, and I eat it with something very high in fiber, lets say for example some sort of fiber supplement, or some other high fiber food, and I eat 90 grams worth of fiber, does that mean that my body will only truly digest 10 grams of carbs.

( now I know the example sounds ridiculous but I just want to know if that concept would work? )

or does the fiber have to come from the spaghetti itself? because I was thinking about when I go back home for vacation and I would have to sometimes have dinners with my parents which is usually moderate to high in carbs, I could maybe buy some sort of fiber supplement or find a food online thats high in carb, and maybe consume the fiber as I'm eating those carbs.

Thank you very much.

bodler
12-05-2011, 09:05 AM
100g carbs from pasta + 90g fiber = 100g net carbs.. not 10g

So then are you saying that this whole theory of Total carbs minus fiber is bogus? could you please elaborate?

I don't really know I just found out about that stuff, cause I read studies and such saying that subtracting fiber from total carbs give you the amount that you will truly be storing.

rhizome
12-05-2011, 09:08 AM
So then are you saying that this whole theory of Total carbs minus fiber is bogus? could you please elaborate?

I don't really know I just found out about that stuff, cause I read studies and such saying that subtracting fiber from total carbs give you the amount that you will truly be storing.

The way you wrote your example makes it seem like 1 gram of fiber from one food source obliterates 1 grams of real complex carb from another food source. Just sayin

bodler
12-05-2011, 09:20 AM
Your math is wrong.

100g carbs pasta + 90g fiber from a supplement = 190g TOTAL carbs

190g TOTAL carbs - 90g fiber carbs = 100g NET carbs


Ok I thought it was something that automatically deducted the total amount of carbs.

But would you still say that eating 90 grams of fiber ( lets say from flax seed ) will still reduce the impact that the carbs from the spaghetti will have on my insulin?

or will the effect of the added fiber not be strong enough?

03SVT_COBRA
12-05-2011, 10:38 AM
Fiber is insluble in the human body, therefore it is not really counted as a carb. Eating fiber does not cancel out any other carbs you eat though. All fiber does Is fill you up and help with bowel movements. It will have zero effect on anything else, and will not lower your insulin or cancel out any carbs.

rhizome
12-05-2011, 10:57 AM
Fiber is insluble in the human body, therefore it is not really counted as a carb. Eating fiber does not cancel out any other carbs you eat though. All fiber does Is fill you up and help with bowel movements. It will have zero effect on anything else, and will not lower your insulin or cancel out any carbs.

Tell that to the bacteria in your colon that ferment it and produce fatty acids from it phaggot. I dare you.

bodler
12-05-2011, 12:18 PM
Fiber is insluble in the human body, therefore it is not really counted as a carb. Eating fiber does not cancel out any other carbs you eat though. All fiber does Is fill you up and help with bowel movements. It will have zero effect on anything else, and will not lower your insulin or cancel out any carbs.

jn.nutrition.org/content/119/12/1925.full.pdf

Guar Gum is a type of fiber and according to this test and some others I found online, it does have an effect on the reducing the insulin response of eating a carb loaded meal.

waqas11
12-05-2011, 12:56 PM
So your saying fiber supplement Husk, has no calories?? The macros are 3g fiber --12calories tbsp.

synthetic
12-05-2011, 01:19 PM
So your saying fiber supplement Husk, has no calories?? The macros are 3g fiber --12calories tbsp.

calories are a measurement of how much energy it takes to raise the temperature of water by 1 degree... this is not what happens in the body; because if it were and if you burn 110+ calories - you would die :)

WonderPug
12-05-2011, 01:28 PM
calories are a measurement of how much energy it takes to raise the temperature of water by 1 degree... this is not what happens in the body; because if it were and if you burn 110+ calories - you would dieThat's absurd.

You obviously don't understand the definition of a calorie.



FYI:

One gram calorie is the approximate energy needed to heat one gram of water by 1 C.
One dietary calorie is the approximate energy needed to heat one kilogram of water by 1 C.

waqas11
12-05-2011, 02:24 PM
That's absurd.

You obviously don't understand the definition of a calorie.



FYI:

One gram calorie is the approximate energy needed to heat one gram of water by 1 C.
One dietary calorie is the approximate energy needed to heat one kilogram of water by 1 C.

So fiber supps calories do count?

bodler
12-05-2011, 06:26 PM
Well I'm not debating the fact that it has calories or not, personally I don't care how many calories I eat, I'm just pointing out the fact that apparently some fibers like gum gar/Psyllium can reduce the effect that carbs has on insulin/blood glucose. And therefore could be considered an option for someone who wants to keep their insulin untouched.

AlwaysTryin
12-05-2011, 06:31 PM
Well I'm not debating the fact that it has calories or not, personally I don't care how many calories I eat, I'm just pointing out the fact that apparently some fibers like gum gar/Psyllium can reduce the effect that carbs has on insulin/blood glucose. And therefore could be considered an option for someone who wants to keep their insulin untouched.
That's not what your OP said

bodler
12-06-2011, 03:13 AM
That's not what your OP said

I neve rmentioned anything about calories, just carbs and insulin spike. My concern is not how much calories I eat ( I eat like 1000 calories worth of peanut in one shot at random times throughout the day.)

I am only debating and trying to learn about how some type of fibers can slow down the effects that carbs has on insulin, line that test study I posted earlier.

adamrochester
12-06-2011, 06:26 AM
1g of fibre is 4 calories fibre has calories bro

WonderPug
12-06-2011, 06:30 AM
I neve rmentioned anything about calories, just carbs and insulin spike. My concern is not how much calories I eat ( I eat like 1000 calories worth of peanut in one shot at random times throughout the day.)Why do you care about "carbs and insulin spikes" rather than the number of calories you consume?

synthetic
12-06-2011, 08:48 AM
That's absurd.

You obviously don't understand the definition of a calorie.



FYI:

One gram calorie is the approximate energy needed to heat one gram of water by 1 C.


One dietary calorie is the approximate energy needed to heat one kilogram of water by 1 C.

you dont understand the joke that if you burnt 110 calories that means your blood temp would be 110*C

Gnadenlos
12-06-2011, 08:55 AM
I neve rmentioned anything about calories, just carbs and insulin spike. My concern is not how much calories I eat ( I eat like 1000 calories worth of peanut in one shot at random times throughout the day.)

I am only debating and trying to learn about how some type of fibers can slow down the effects that carbs has on insulin, line that test study I posted earlier.

If you're worried about insulin... don't eat pasta. Problem solved.

WonderPug
12-06-2011, 09:05 AM
you dont understand the joke that if you burnt 110 calories that means your blood temp would be 110*CFrankly, the vast majority of your posts seem like jokes to me, but I realize that you're often serious. In this case, I guessed wrong and you were really joking.

joejccva71
12-06-2011, 09:55 AM
I believe that Lyle McDonald says that fiber counts as 2g of carbs intead of 4g.

So if you ate 100g of carbs, and 20g of it were fiber then your calories would be 360. You don't just subtract fiber and call it a day.

bodler
12-06-2011, 12:48 PM
Why do you care about "carbs and insulin spikes" rather than the number of calories you consume?

Because after reading Garu Taubes book Why We Get Fat I have been convinced that people get fat because they eat much carbs and not because they eat to many calories in total ( I know that's hard to believe, but if you read the book attentively you might get an idea, I myself also though that high calories made you fat ). Protein and carbs don't activate and insulin spike, at least way less, so therefore one is able to eat as much fat and protein ( especially fat, protein can still spike if you eat way to much ).

But I know most people here and everyone in the world believe it is calories in and calories out, and you guys maybe have no reason to think otherwise, many of you are already ripped and probably don't even need to put as much effort anyway. But yeah I really don't wanna derail this thread and start having back and forth on wether its total calories or total carbs that makes one fatter, I am now in research of things that prove that eating High G foods with some type of fiber will reduce the insulin spike, simple as that :)

bodler
12-06-2011, 12:55 PM
If you're worried about insulin... don't eat pasta. Problem solved.

I understand, I try my best to eat as little carbs as I can, I am just trying to find evidence on fiber and weather it could be a good supplement for *if* I would have to eat a little carbs. I am trying to make my body run on ketones more so then carbs so..thats why. I don't necessarily need to go low carb I feel already lean enough and have low body fat, it's just I have a tiny bit of adipose tissue I am trying to get rid of and I think the only way to do is to activate my Hormone Sensitive Lipase so it can break down my triglycerides, and my body can't do so if I eat carbs since carbs will active insulin and insulin prevents the HSL from being activated. ( from Gary Taubes book, page 186 )

MikeK46
12-06-2011, 02:18 PM
Because after reading Garu Taubes book Why We Get Fat I have been convinced that people get fat because they eat much carbs and not because they eat to many calories in total ( I know that's hard to believe, but if you read the book attentively you might get an idea, I myself also though that high calories made you fat ). Protein and carbs don't activate and insulin spike, at least way less, so therefore one is able to eat as much fat and protein ( especially fat, protein can still spike if you eat way to much ).

But I know most people here and everyone in the world believe it is calories in and calories out, and you guys maybe have no reason to think otherwise, many of you are already ripped and probably don't even need to put as much effort anyway. But yeah I really don't wanna derail this thread and start having back and forth on wether its total calories or total carbs that makes one fatter, I am now in research of things that prove that eating High G foods with some type of fiber will reduce the insulin spike, simple as that :)

http://cache.ohinternet.com/images/thumb/7/73/JeanLucPicardFacepalm.jpg/618px-JeanLucPicardFacepalm.jpg

Kid...it's basic thermodynamics. If you disagree, then you are actually saying that energy can be created and destroyed. It can't. If I eat 5000 calories of protein but only burn 2000 calories, those 3000 extra calories have to be stored somewhere. It has nothing to do with carbs.

Energy (calories) in - Energy (calories) out = Change in Body Stores

http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/fat-loss/the-energy-balance-equation.html

bodler
12-06-2011, 02:45 PM
Ok, like I said I don't want to debate stuff about calories, you might be right I might be wrong, but as of now my focus is on the effect of fiber on insulin spike.

WonderPug
12-06-2011, 04:28 PM
Because after reading Garu Taubes book Why We Get Fat I have been convinced that people get fat because they eat much carbs and not because they eat to many calories in total ( I know that's hard to believe, but if you read the book attentively you might get an idea, I myself also though that high calories made you fat ). Protein and carbs don't activate and insulin spike, at least way less, so therefore one is able to eat as much fat and protein ( especially fat, protein can still spike if you eat way to much ).

But I know most people here and everyone in the world believe it is calories in and calories out, and you guys maybe have no reason to think otherwise, many of you are already ripped and probably don't even need to put as much effort anyway. But yeah I really don't wanna derail this thread and start having back and forth on wether its total calories or total carbs that makes one fatter, I am now in research of things that prove that eating High G foods with some type of fiber will reduce the insulin spike, simple as that :)Interesting perspective.

Here is a more accurate overview of the efficacy of various diet protocols: http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa0804748


Reduced-calorie diets result in clinically meaningful weight loss regardless of which macronutrients they emphasize.

bodler
12-07-2011, 04:29 AM
ok, your right, calories does matter.

Now lets discuss the effects of fiber on insulin spike