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View Full Version : Fat News- Obese Monkeys Lose Weight On Drug That Attacks Blood Supply of Fat Cells



th3pwn3r
11-15-2011, 05:47 AM
ScienceDaily (Nov. 9, 2011) Obese rhesus monkeys lost on average 11 percent of their body weight after four weeks of treatment with an experimental drug that selectively destroys the blood supply of fat tissue, a research team led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reports in Science Translational Medicine.


Body mass index (BMI) and abdominal circumference (waistline) also were reduced, while all three measures were unchanged in untreated control monkeys. Imaging studies also showed a substantial decrease in body fat among treated animals.

"Development of this compound for human use would provide a non-surgical way to actually reduce accumulated white fat, in contrast to current weight-loss drugs that attempt to control appetite or prevent absorption of dietary fat," said co-senior author Renata Pasqualini, Ph.D., professor in MD Anderson's David H. Koch Center for Applied Research of Genitourinary Cancers.

Previous attempts to treat obesity have predominantly focused on drugs aimed at suppressing appetite or increasing metabolism, the researchers noted, but these efforts have been hampered by their toxic side-effects. The MD Anderson group designed a new drug, which includes a homing agent that binds to a protein on the surface of fat-supporting blood vessels and a synthetic peptide that triggers cell death. Their blood supply gone, fat cells are reabsorbed and metabolized.

"Obesity is a major risk factor for developing cancer, roughly the equivalent of tobacco use, and both are potentially reversible" said co-senior author Wadih Arap, M.D., Ph.D., also professor in the Koch Center. "Obese cancer patients do worse in surgery, with radiation or on chemotherapy -- worse by any measure."

Monkeys are spontaneously obese In earlier preclinical research, obese mice lost about 30 percent of their body weight with the drug, now called Adipotide. The drug acts on white adipose tissue, the scientific name for the unhealthy type of fat that accumulates under the skin and around the abdomen, and is a disease and mortality predictor.

"Most drugs against obesity fail in transition between rodents and primates," Pasqualini said. "All rodent models of obesity are faulty because their metabolism and central nervous system control of appetite and satiety are very different from primates, including humans. We're greatly encouraged to see substantial weight loss in a primate model of obesity that closely matches the human condition."

The rhesus monkeys in the current study were "spontaneously" obese, said study first author Kirstin Barnhart, D.V.M, Ph.D., a veterinary clinical pathologist at MD Anderson's Keeling Center for Comparative Medicine and Research in Bastrop, Texas. No specific actions were taken to make them overweight; they became so by overeating the same foods provided to other monkeys in the colony and avoiding physical activity.

The wider problems of obesity This primate model also shares other physiological features associated with human obesity, such as metabolic syndrome, characterized by an increased resistance to insulin, which can lead to the development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Adipotide-treated monkeys showed marked improvements in insulin resistance -- using about 50 percent less insulin after treatment.

Arap, Pasqualini and colleagues are preparing for a clinical trial in which obese prostate cancer patients would receive daily injections of Adipotide for 28 consecutive days. "The question is, will their prostate cancer become better if we can reduce their body weight and the associated health risks," Arap said.

Some prostate cancer treatments, such as hormone therapy, cause weight gain. Greater weight can lead to arthritis, which in turn causes inactivity that leads to more weight gain, a cascade effect of co-morbidities, Arap said. Fat cells also secrete growth hormones that cancer cells thrive upon.

Overall and abdominal body fat levels drop, with reversible renal side effects Weight, BMI and abdominal circumference all continued to drop for three weeks after treatment ended before slowly beginning to reverse during the fourth week of the follow-up period.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) was used to gauge abdominal body fat, thought to be the most dangerous area for humans to gain weight in terms of raising disease risk. Treated monkeys' abdominal fat levels fell by 27 percent during the study. Fat levels increased slightly in the control group.

Lean monkeys did not lose weight in a separate study to test for potential effects of the drug in non-obese animals, indicating that the drug's effect may be selective for obese subjects.

Monkeys in the studies remained bright and alert throughout, interacting with caretakers and demonstrating no signs of nausea or food avoidance. This is a potentially important finding since unpleasant side-effects have limited the use of approved drugs that reduce fat absorption in the intestines.

The principal side effects were noted in the kidneys. "The renal effect was dose-dependent, predictable and reversible," Barnhart noted.

Second drug developed via vascular ZIP codes This study is the second drug developed using a vascular mapping technique created by the Arap-Pasqualini lab. Blood vessels, they found, are more than a uniform and ubiquitous "pipeline" that serves the circulatory system, but differ depending on the organ or tissue that they support.

They have developed a way of screening peptides -- small bits of proteins -- to identify those that bind to specific vascular cells among the many possible "ZIP codes" present in a human vascular map. For blood vessels that support fat cells, the target protein is prohibitin, which they found in unusual abundance on the blood vessel cell surface.

"The same delivery system used in mice and monkeys was recently validated in human white fat, as reported recently by our group," Arap said.

An earlier drug, which uses a different molecular address to target the blood supply of prostate cancer, has been evaluated in a first-in-man clinical trial, just completed at MD Anderson. MD Anderson and some of its researchers, including Arap and Pasqualini, have equity positions in drug-development companies Alvos Therapeutics and Ablaris Therapeutics, which are subjected to certain restrictions under institutional policy. MD Anderson manages and monitors the terms of these arrangements in accordance with its conflict-of-interest policy.

This research was funded by grants from the National Institutes of Health, the National Cancer Institute, AngelWorks, the Gillson-Longenbaugh Foundation, the Kleberg Foundation, the Marcus Foundation and the Prostate Cancer Foundation. 11/9/11

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/11/111109143009.htm

Most people who view this will probably TL;DR :D This is worth reading though, well, at least in my opinion. I found it pretty interesting.

TelusLob
11-15-2011, 08:13 AM
Interesting indeed.

rnacdaley
11-15-2011, 08:18 AM
It sounds like we are another step closer to the magic pill! What would really be interesting would be to see approx how much is spent annually on research designed to develope these fat loss drugs. I am sure the cost of that is higher than actually educating the public on how to reduce BF% on their own.

diesel_3
11-15-2011, 08:25 AM
Thanks for the post, Pwn3r!
Very interesting read!

th3pwn3r
11-15-2011, 08:36 AM
It sounds like we are another step closer to the magic pill! What would really be interesting would be to see approx how much is spent annually on research designed to develope these fat loss drugs. I am sure the cost of that is higher than actually educating the public on how to reduce BF% on their own.

Ha, of course a magic pill will generate a lot more profit than running around the park. I wonder what has happened to the test subjects after they stopped using this, I'm wondering if they fattened right back up. Probably not because they're animals in an environment where their food is probably portioned/limited.

Also, I realize that reading the text in the format I posted is horrible so do yourself a favor and click the link haha.

KiwiATV
11-15-2011, 10:22 AM
Very interesting. I want to see how this tests in humans. Molecular targeting is huge right now in drug delivery systems (I'm in pharmacy school), so it's no surprise to see something like this surfacing now. I hate saying this, but a pill like this that actually works would save millions of dollars in healthcare. I'm a fan of old-fashioned exercise and diet, but since western culture has been trending on the lazy side for so long, something like this would really help. Obviously, people aren't scared of disease/death enough to do something about it before it's too late.

It's only a matter of time at this point before we get that magic pill.

th3pwn3r
11-15-2011, 10:28 AM
something like this would really help. Obviously, people aren't scared of disease/death enough to do something about it before it's too late.

It's only a matter of time at this point before we get that magic pill.

Ha, that's optimism kicking in. What I think would happen would be that people start getting this 'treatment' and then abuse it. Instead of eating 2 Big Macs for lunch they'd opt for 4. They would also want higher and higher doses of this, the potential for abuse is just too tempting for most people.

TelusLob
11-15-2011, 10:30 AM
So.. I was just thinking. If this drug inhibits the blood supply to the fat cell, would that effecitvely allow the fat cell to die instead of just shrink? That would be amazing if this compound actually killed fat cells. Where would the stored energy go in those cells when and if they died?

th3pwn3r
11-15-2011, 10:33 AM
I would kill every last one of my fat cells. Then the obvious outcome would be that I only store surplus calories as muscle mass, DUH! :D

dazdilly
11-15-2011, 11:03 AM
Brain is approx 60% fat. Zombies here we come. I think one of the Zombie Apocalypse movies used the "diet pill" as its premise.

ryanthestark
11-15-2011, 11:17 AM
lol isn't there tons of important fat tissue in vital organs? Sounds like another highly dangerous fat burner that actually works, like DNP or something lol. Will get outlawed within a few months if ever allowed to be used for humans

Corb158
11-15-2011, 03:31 PM
Ha, that's optimism kicking in. What I think would happen would be that people start getting this 'treatment' and then abuse it. Instead of eating 2 Big Macs for lunch they'd opt for 4. They would also want higher and higher doses of this, the potential for abuse is just too tempting for most people.

It limits blood supply to fat, you wouldn't have to take more if you ate more, the physiology is already changed.
Only abuse you could do with this drug is kill yourself or get super skinny, and there's renal problems there to, your kidneys would probably shut down if you abused them.

Really this is the first stones to pave the road to killing blood supplies to Cancers, this is way more than just fat loss.
But wow 11% body fat in only 4 weeks, this is gonna be the future unless somethin better comes. Which is what I think about almost every article on Science daily hah.


lol isn't there tons of important fat tissue in vital organs? Sounds like another highly dangerous fat burner that actually works, like DNP or something lol. Will get outlawed within a few months if ever allowed to be used for humans
No.


So.. I was just thinking. If this drug inhibits the blood supply to the fat cell, would that effecitvely allow the fat cell to die instead of just shrink? That would be amazing if this compound actually killed fat cells. Where would the stored energy go in those cells when and if they died?
"Their blood supply gone, fat cells are reabsorbed and metabolized." - that study.

LengthyLifter
11-15-2011, 03:35 PM
If you're like me, you were wondering what an obese rhesus monkey looks like:

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_FOUnA3YBgxQ/SChyhnH8rVI/AAAAAAAACWs/Swvxg9cHFy0/s400/r1679413343.jpg


Any BF guesses?

nlite2000
11-15-2011, 03:45 PM
lol isn't there tons of important fat tissue in vital organs? Sounds like another highly dangerous fat burner that actually works, like DNP or something lol. Will get outlawed within a few months if ever allowed to be used for humans

You're over simplifying it. And if there were brain degeneration, it would be easily apparent and demonstrable in any animal, especially a primate. Furthermore, you would be on death's door long before your body started using fat stores in the brain for energy.


And DNP isn't really dangerous if used correctly--it's just very, very easy to overdose and die. Enough so that it should be illegal, because people are retarded.



I don't understand the schaudenfreude here---If this works, and is safe, how is that even remotely bad? Who doesn't like cupcakes?

TelusLob
11-15-2011, 04:42 PM
If you're like me, you were wondering what an obese rhesus monkey looks like:

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_FOUnA3YBgxQ/SChyhnH8rVI/AAAAAAAACWs/Swvxg9cHFy0/s400/r1679413343.jpg


Any BF guesses?

Does he even lift?

pffftttt