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SYRIANKID
11-05-2011, 03:31 AM
http://globalpublicsquare.blogs.cnn.com/2011/11/02/what-are-americans-studying/?hpt=wo_r1

More people are attending college in the United States than ever before. There were 18 million undergraduate students in 2009, and more than 1.6 million Bachelor's degrees were awarded that year. But are college students studying the subjects that will lead to good jobs and keep America competitive in the world economy?

http://cnngps.files.wordpress.com/2011/11/college-majors.jpg?w=401&h=341

Shortfuze
11-05-2011, 03:56 AM
I blame our education system. Our math and science standards are crap because we lack quality teachers who don't have the training, patience, guidance or support from their own schools; they have to follow artificial time tables forcing them to teach maximum amount of material in the shortest possible time and education in general is so politicized that rather than looking for the best and brightest students, we cater to the mediocre students by lowering the bar so that they can graduate without hurting their feelings.

Streetbull
11-05-2011, 03:56 AM
http://globalpublicsquare.blogs.cnn.com/2011/11/02/what-are-americans-studying/?hpt=wo_r1

More people are attending college in the United States than ever before. There were 18 million undergraduate students in 2009, and more than 1.6 million Bachelor's degrees were awarded that year. But are college students studying the subjects that will lead to good jobs and keep America competitive in the world economy?

http://cnngps.files.wordpress.com/2011/11/college-majors.jpg?w=401&h=341

Not math, that's for sure. Never saw so many innumerate people lately...

IAmBatman
11-05-2011, 04:05 AM
As a business student I would like to see the breakdown of the business studies to be honest. I go to a somewhat large and reputable business school, and it's astounding the amount of students who shy away from the math based business fields. From what I've seen in my graduating class more students are concentrating in the fields of Labor Relations, Marketing, Human Resources, "International Business" than the math based fields. There are quite a few studying accounting and some in finance, but you rarely meet anyone studying management science or operational research.

AnIrIsHbOy
11-05-2011, 04:17 AM
That's quite worrying. When I saw the second table I thought "wtf strong improvement", but realised it was international as opposed to USA. I'd be curious to see the figures in Europe.

N.W.A
11-05-2011, 06:35 AM
I wonder what statistics are for graduate degrees. Many students today are continuing their education after they've received their bachelors. I did see that kind of trend when I was in uni. Many people were majoring in Communication, marketing, and liberal arts. Kind of a useless bachelors in my opinion. Though many of them stated they wanted to pursue law school or some other graduate programs.

Streetbull
11-05-2011, 07:08 AM
Humanity is divided into two groups -- conceptual thinkers and perceptual thinkers. The former group does well at math, econ, science and so on. My estimate is that the ratio is about 12% conceptual and 88% perceptual.

The perceptual group is basically irrational (Reason being how humans form concepts) and does things like expecting more government benefits with reduced taxes, or that hiring a gov't to plunder ones' neighbors is perfectly fine, or that people who earn money somehow 'owe' money to those who didn't want to be bothered.

In this forum, some of those people are those who, if they can't vote for Ron Paul, will vote for his complete opposite, Barack Obama. It is truly fascinating!

TimDF
11-05-2011, 07:14 AM
If I was better at more advanced math I would major in mathematics or engineering.

MakeABanana
11-05-2011, 07:37 AM
I wonder what statistics are for graduate degrees. Many students today are continuing their education after they've received their bachelors. I did see that kind of trend when I was in uni. Many people were majoring in Communication, marketing, and liberal arts. Kind of a useless bachelors in my opinion. Though many of them stated they wanted to pursue law school or some other graduate programs.

I noticed, at least for my engineering graduate courses, about half the students are international, most of them being Arab or Desi.

makavelli1988
11-05-2011, 06:35 PM
Humanity is divided into two groups -- conceptual thinkers and perceptual thinkers. The former group does well at math, econ, science and so on. My estimate is that the ratio is about 12% conceptual and 88% perceptual.

The perceptual group is basically irrational (Reason being how humans form concepts) and does things like expecting more government benefits with reduced taxes, or that hiring a gov't to plunder ones' neighbors is perfectly fine, or that people who earn money somehow 'owe' money to those who didn't want to be bothered.

In this forum, some of those people are those who, if they can't vote for Ron Paul, will vote for his complete opposite, Barack Obama. It is truly fascinating!

If you truly believe this, please seek help.

Please stay safe Streetbull. They're obviously out to get you.

DiseasedScrotum
11-05-2011, 06:41 PM
As a business student I would like to see the breakdown of the business studies to be honest. I go to a somewhat large and reputable business school, and it's astounding the amount of students who shy away from the math based business fields. From what I've seen in my graduating class more students are concentrating in the fields of Labor Relations, Marketing, Human Resources, "International Business" than the math based fields. There are quite a few studying accounting and some in finance, but you rarely meet anyone studying management science or operational research.

This. HUGE difference between an accounting major with a minor in finance and a management major with a minor in marketing. Saying someone is studying business means nothing.

also, Operations Management/Management Science is a great field of study so many people ignore. Some think its a soft management degree course but it isn't.

Jpenn89
11-05-2011, 06:48 PM
Thank god that means I will have a job when I graduate. Associates in aviation technology, BS in Electrical engineering with 6 years experience in a hydraulic engineering field.

It is a sad state of affairs we are in. so many people get these degrees, and then the market becomes saturated with people who are not qualified for the jobs that are available and are not willing to do jobs they feel are "Beneath them"

OneEyedSnake
11-05-2011, 06:56 PM
Some of these categories can give you the wrong idea. For example, I believe that economics is technically a social science. So is sociology, criminal justice, and psychology. Big difference between economics and the others as far as math ability is concerned.

Finance is often a business degree category yet it is much more math than management/marketing. In short, math ability is not soley limited to the math and engineering categories. Yes, the math for math and engineering is harder but very few jobs require that level of ability.