PDA

View Full Version : Study Shows Why Itís Hard to Keep Weight Off



pvk
10-26-2011, 08:12 PM
The dieters then spent 10 weeks on a very low calorie regimen of 500 to 550 calories a day intended to makes them lose 10 percent of their body weight. In fact, their weight loss averaged 14 percent, or 29 pounds. As expected, their hormone levels changed in a way that increased their appetites, and indeed they were hungrier than when they started the study.

The study, being published Thursday in The New England Journal of Medicine. Linky nytimes.com/2011/10/27/health/biological-changes-thwart-weight-loss-efforts-study-finds.html

sawoobley
10-26-2011, 08:17 PM
Link? Name and authors? Pubmed ID?

drewzon87
10-26-2011, 08:23 PM
i heard you turn into a ghrelin if you eat after midnight

dukend
10-26-2011, 08:25 PM
i heard you turn into a ghrelin if you eat after midnight

drewzon, ****ing fix your terrible, terrible spelling error

pvk
10-26-2011, 08:33 PM
Link? Name and authors? Pubmed ID?
nytimes.com/2011/10/27/health/biological-changes-thwart-weight-loss-efforts-study-finds.html

The study, being published Thursday in The New England Journal of Medicine from what report is saying

Joseph1990
10-26-2011, 08:38 PM
The dieters then spent 10 weeks on a very low calorie regimen of 500 to 550 calories a day intended to makes them lose 10 percent of their body weight. In fact, their weight loss averaged 14 percent, or 29 pounds. As expected, their hormone levels changed in a way that increased their appetites, and indeed they were hungrier than when they started the study.

The study, being published Thursday in The New England Journal of Medicine. Linky nytimes.com/2011/10/27/health/biological-changes-thwart-weight-loss-efforts-study-finds.html

So if I only eat 500-550 calories a day I will be more hungry then when I'm eating 2-2700 calories. (No ****....) Am I reading this right or do you mean a deficit of 500-550 calories?

pvk
10-26-2011, 08:44 PM
So if I only eat 500-550 calories a day I will be more hungry then when I'm eating 2-2700 calories. (No ****....) Am I reading this right or do you mean a deficit of 500-550 calories?

From what they report is saying 500-550 calories total for the day! Not a 500-550 deficit, 10 weeks and they lost over 10% bf...who the hell wouldn't lose the weight. I thought a 2000 cal/day was hard enough and I felt like crap for a while, the people in this study must of wanted to die.

sawoobley
10-26-2011, 09:09 PM
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/27/health/biological-changes-thwart-weight-loss-efforts-study-finds.html


In the study, Joseph Proietto and his colleagues at the University of Melbourne recruited people who weighed an average of 209 pounds. At the start of the study, his team measured the participants’ hormone levels and assessed their hunger and appetites after they ate a boiled egg, toast, margarine, orange juice and crackers for breakfast. The dieters then spent 10 weeks on a very low calorie regimen of 500 to 550 calories a day intended to makes them lose 10 percent of their body weight. In fact, their weight loss averaged 14 percent, or 29 pounds. As expected, their hormone levels changed in a way that increased their appetites, and indeed they were hungrier than when they started the study.

They were then given diets intended to maintain their weight loss. A year after the subjects had lost the weight, the researchers repeated their measurements. The subjects were gaining the weight back despite the maintenance diet — on average, gaining back half of what they had lost — and the hormone levels offered a possible explanation.

One hormone, leptin, which tells the brain how much body fat is present, fell by two-thirds immediately after the subjects lost weight. When leptin falls, appetite increases and metabolism slows. A year after the weight loss diet, leptin levels were still one-third lower than they were at the start of the study, and leptin levels increased as subjects regained their weight.

Other hormones that stimulate hunger, in particular ghrelin, whose levels increased, and peptide YY, whose levels decreased, were also changed a year later in a way that made the subjects’ appetites stronger than at the start of the study.

The results show, once again, Dr. Leibel said, that losing weight “is not a neutral event,” and that it is no accident that more than 90 percent of people who lose a lot of weight gain it back. “You are putting your body into a circumstance it will resist,” he said. “You are, in a sense, more metabolically normal when you are at a higher body weight.”

A solution might be to restore hormones to normal levels by giving drugs after dieters lose weight. But it is also possible, said Dr. Jules Hirsch of Rockefeller University, that researchers just do not know enough about obesity to prescribe solutions.

One thing is clear, he said: “A vast effort to persuade the public to change its habits just hasn’t prevented or cured obesity.”

“We need more knowledge,” Dr. Hirsch said. “Condemning the public for their uncontrollable hedonism and the food industry for its inequities just doesn’t seem to be turning the tide.”

OtisBDriftwood
10-26-2011, 10:06 PM
They rebounded pretty harshly? No sh*t batman!
:rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

mtruitt76
10-27-2011, 04:51 AM
So a prolonged crash diet can be bad for me, think I will file that in the no s**t file. Study would be more interesting and relevant if they had included a third group which dieted with a moderate deficit.

WonderPug
10-27-2011, 05:51 AM
Doing things the wrong way is bad? Wow, who would have guessed.


A solution might be to restore hormones to normal levels by giving drugs after dieters lose weight. But it is also possible, said Dr. Jules Hirsch of Rockefeller University, that researchers just do not know enough about obesity to prescribe solutions.
Here is a simple solution: forget about crash diets and put people on a 10% to at most 20% deficit for weight loss.