PDA

View Full Version : What are the potential negative consequences of consuming too much dietary fat?



JohnnyOhhh
08-30-2011, 06:05 AM
Are there any? Lately I've been eating a smaller amount of food (1st week of college) but the food I've been eating has way more dietary fat than what I usually eat. And I'm not really referring to any specific kind of fat, because though my sat fat intake has increased alot (eating lots of fatty beef) so has my mono/polyunsaturated intake increased (fish oil, seeds, nuts).

Are there any serious health consequences or even mild physique disadvantages that come from a diet with too much fat? I work out 2x a day, once cardio, once heavy weights, and I'm certainly not overeating (currently 8-10% bodyfat), and I'm just wondering if I should do something to curb my intake.

HunterCML
08-30-2011, 06:16 AM
Eating "too much" fat will make you fat by raising your daily caloric intake over your TDEE.

"Too much" is by definition "too much". However if you consume a large majority of your "extra allowed calories" after protein and fat minimums are covered from more fat but stay in the caloric range that you should be in - no negative consequences.

snorkelman
08-30-2011, 06:17 AM
in.before.trans.fat.fanatics.jpg

JohnnyOhhh
08-30-2011, 06:27 AM
Eating "too much" fat will make you fat by raising your daily caloric intake over your TDEE.

"Too much" is by definition "too much". However if you consume a large majority of your "extra allowed calories" after protein and fat minimums are covered from more fat but stay in the caloric range that you should be in - no negative consequences.

Nice. My calories almost always stay under 2500, most days it's even under 2000...which may be too little, but as I prefer to stay lean (and get even leaner!) I'd rather undershoot it than overshoot it. Thanks for the response.



in.before.trans.fat.fanatics.jpg

The only thing in my diet that could possibly have trans fats is burgers, which I have 1-2 of each day. Although supposedly the burgers here are free-range and organic, which should theoretically improve their nutrient profile, amirite?

I don't eat anything fried, either, so we're not talking about those kinds of fats. I'm referring to fat from red meat, nuts/seeds, and fish oil (I take roughly ~10g per day).

Thanks for replying guys. Anyone else have any input?

Xfaxtor
08-30-2011, 06:34 AM
Nice. My calories almost always stay under 2500, most days it's even under 2000...which may be too little, but as I prefer to stay lean (and get even leaner!) I'd rather undershoot it than overshoot it. Thanks for the response.




The only thing in my diet that could possibly have trans fats is burgers, which I have 1-2 of each day. Although supposedly the burgers here are free-range and organic, which should theoretically improve their nutrient profile, amirite?

I don't eat anything fried, either, so we're not talking about those kinds of fats. I'm referring to fat from red meat, nuts/seeds, and fish oil (I take roughly ~10g per day).

Thanks for replying guys. Anyone else have any input?

1 or 2 burgers a day? Mirin

festeri
08-30-2011, 06:42 AM
Some hypothesize that both very high and very low fat diets can contribute to gallbladder disease such as gallstones, however there aren't any actual studies looking into it. At your energy intake level any "high" level of fat intake is still going to be quite low compared to a big person so I wouldn't worry about it.

jarekd1234
08-30-2011, 06:42 AM
Right now im eating around 200g fats a day, cant cook as im on holiday, so milk, whey, bread, sunflowerseeds and crisps(to up my calories) is all i eat. Cardio everyday playing soccer so i think im fine with that much fat not blocking arteries or something like that?

HunterCML
08-30-2011, 06:48 AM
Right now im eating around 200g fats a day, cant cook as im on holiday, so milk, whey, bread, sunflowerseeds and crisps(to up my calories) is all i eat. Cardio everyday playing soccer so i think im fine with that much fat not blocking arteries or something like that?

Dietary fat is fine. The FDA's recommendation of a low fat diet is from rather outdated and misguided information that they haven't bothered to re-evaluate. Their previous concerns that saturated fats cause CVD and CHD has pretty much been proven inaccurate.

Meta-analysis that saturated fat does not cause CVD/CHD:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20071648

With that said, the only fat I would try and limit are synthetic trans fats. You don't need to be scared and constantly worried about small consumption here and there like some would suggest; just ensure that you don't eat foods that contain these fats often and that you don't consume any countable percentage of your dietary fat from them.