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View Full Version : Alternatives to Kris Gethins recommended diet?



remould
07-21-2011, 11:50 PM
Hi just about to embark on the 12 week training programme by kris gethin here. Fingers crossed i shall start on monday. He breaks down 6 meals. I need suggestions for 2 of the meals. One meal is peanut butter, bread and banana - any suggestions for an alternative to peanut butter? Cant stomach the smell, tried and brought it back up so not a good idea to force feed..... Second one is recommended salmon, same with fish. Other than tinned tuna, i cant get it down me.. One meal was lean meat, veg and rice, was just gonna have this again but might be missing out on something from fish? Lastly, just bought some udos choice, is that similar/preferable to olive oil? Also Udos has omega 3/6 and other blends in it so would that negate the need for fish such as salmon?

Sounds like im being picky but salmon and peanut butter arent just not nice things to me, then are bloody distinctive and i really struggle to get them down me.

Any suggestions or thoughts really appreciated.

Alan

Taz80
07-21-2011, 11:52 PM
Post Macros not a food list, Read the stickies .. meal frequency is irrelevant ... Read the stickies. Next Question.

staunchkg
07-21-2011, 11:54 PM
Hi just about to embark on the 12 week training programme by kris gethin here. Fingers crossed i shall start on monday. He breaks down 6 meals. I need suggestions for 2 of the meals. One meal is peanut butter, bread and banana - any suggestions for an alternative to peanut butter? Cant stomach the smell, tried and brought it back up so not a good idea to force feed..... Second one is recommended salmon, same with fish. Other than tinned tuna, i cant get it down me.. One meal was lean meat, veg and rice, was just gonna have this again but might be missing out on something from fish? Lastly, just bought some udos choice, is that similar/preferable to olive oil? Also Udos has omega 3/6 and other blends in it so would that negate the need for fish such as salmon?

Sounds like im being picky but salmon and peanut butter arent just not nice things to me, then are bloody distinctive and i really struggle to get them down me.

Any suggestions or thoughts really appreciated.

Alan
Well if you can't do the peanut butter and salmon, it is pretty much over then...........

But try almond butter and Tuna...........

remould
07-22-2011, 01:32 AM
Hi maybe i should have been more clear, but thought my avatar may have said something like first post or something. Very new to this site, not that sure what im doing with diet. Came across this site, heard about it and heard it was useful. Went to supersite and seen the transformation sections. Seen the 12 week comp and was considering doing it, that led me to the recommended training and diet - Kris Gethin. That is where i am now, trying to sort diet.

Taz - your answer confused me, but i guess i have to step my game up and learn what you are talking about. I shall read the stickies, but was hoping for a straight 'try this instead' answer til i got my head around the immense amount of information on this site.

Staunchkg - thanks i can eat tuna all day long so i will opt for that, and will give almond spread a try.


Thanks for the input.

WonderPug
07-22-2011, 01:37 AM
I'd strongly recommend you avoid that diet because it artificially limits food choice and mandates frequent meals, all with the aim of selling supplements.

What's important to understand is that bodyweight is a function of caloric balance and that meeting your micro/macronutrient requirements plays a role in body composition. Specific foods are not relevant outside the context of total daily nutrition. Additionally, meal frequency and timing are largely irrelevant.

For much better advice on how to structure a diet that is maximally effective, flexible and enjoyable, please see:

http://forum.bodybuilding.com/showthread.php?p=436716771
http://forum.bodybuilding.com/showthread.php?t=133634471
http://forum.bodybuilding.com/showthread.php?t=123915821

remould
07-22-2011, 02:06 AM
Hi, something that surprised me so far is that 2 replies have said that timing and frequency is unimportant. I have read around and there seems to be lots of places saying to eat every 3 hours, make sure post training meal or shake is within an hour of training, 6 meals per day, and all the rest.

Thanks for the replies, and i shall read through the stickies and the links wunderpug has provided. Was hoping to get this sorted over the weekend to start on monday, fingers crossed.

cheers

Alan

WonderPug
07-22-2011, 02:33 AM
Hi, something that surprised me so far is that 2 replies have said that timing and frequency is unimportant. I have read around and there seems to be lots of places saying to eat every 3 hours, make sure post training meal or shake is within an hour of training, 6 meals per day, and all the rest.

There's a great deal of misunderstanding about the function and role of meal timing, mostly aimed at getting folks to to use supplements.

If you want to get a sense of the underlying research that strongly indicates that meal timing and frequency are particularly relevant, please see:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19943985
This study shows there was no difference in weight loss between subjects with high/low meal frequencies.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9155494
Evidence supports that meal frequency has nothing to do with energy in the subjects.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11319656
Yet again, no difference in energy in the subjects compared to 2 meals/d to 6 meals/d.



And if you want to do some more detailed digging, you can read:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1905998
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1991 Mar;45(3):161-9.Links
Influence of the feeding frequency on nutrient utilization in man: consequences for energy metabolism.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11319656
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2001 Apr;25(4):519-28.Links
Compared with nibbling, neither gorging nor a morning fast affect short-term energy balance in obese patients in a chamber calorimeter.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18053311
Br J Nutr. 2008 Jun;99(6):1316-21. Epub 2007 Dec 6. Links
Acute effects on metabolism and appetite profile of one meal difference in the lower range of meal frequency.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1905998
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1991 Mar;45(3):161-9.Links
Influence of the feeding frequency on nutrient utilization in man: consequences for energy metabolism.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11319656
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2001 Apr;25(4):519-28.Links
Compared with nibbling, neither gorging nor a morning fast affect short-term energy balance in obese patients in a chamber calorimeter.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18053311
Br J Nutr. 2008 Jun;99(6):1316-21. Epub 2007 Dec 6. Links
Acute effects on metabolism and appetite profile of one meal difference in the lower range of meal frequency.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9155494
Br J Nutr. 1997 Apr;77 Suppl 1:S57-70. Links
Meal frequency and energy balance.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15806828
Forum Nutr. 2003;56:126-8.Links
Highlighting the positive impact of increasing feeding frequency on metabolism and weight management.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9504318
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1998 Feb;22(2):105-12.Links
Evidence that eating frequency is inversely related to body weight status in male, but not female, non-obese adults reporting valid dietary intakes.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15085170
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2004 May;28(5):653-60. Links
Decreased thermic effect of food after an irregular compared with a regular meal pattern in healthy lean women.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15220950
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2004 Jul;58(7):1071-7. Links
Regular meal frequency creates more appropriate insulin sensitivity and lipid profiles compared with irregular meal frequency in healthy lean women.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17228037
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2007 Jan;15(1):100-6. Links
Association of eating frequency with body fatness in pre- and postmenopausal women.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15640455
Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Jan;81(1):16-24. Links
Comment in:
Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Jan;81(1):3-4.
Beneficial metabolic effects of regular meal frequency on dietary thermogenesis, insulin sensitivity, and fasting lipid profiles in healthy obese women.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10578205
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1999 Nov;23(11):1151-9.Links
Acute appetite reduction associated with an increased frequency of eating in obese males.

AlwaysTryin
07-22-2011, 04:07 AM
thanks i can eat tuna all day long so i will opt for that, and will give almond spread a try.


Thanks for the input.

How much tuna are you planning on eating daily...

remould
07-22-2011, 04:38 AM
Wow thanks for the extensive link list! I want to sort my diet out over the next few days so a bit too much to take in there in one go, but ill definately start reading about. Gonna put a bodyspace together so hopefully people can critique what i'm doing there anyway.

Alwaystryin - not sure on how much tuna, but i was going to look at the breakdown from Gethin's mealplan and replace the protein/carb amounts with the same value but as tuna. But already reading a bit of negative stuff about the proposed diet. I guess i will just try it at first with a few variations, then post it up here and beg for advice!

Cheers

Alan

WonderPug
07-22-2011, 05:04 AM
You might want to read about leangains (http://www.leangains.com/) as well.