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View Full Version : Are social classes inhibiting our progress as a society?



Cell-Tech
12-26-2010, 07:50 PM
Not so much social classes, but the fact that you can be born into a social class. The class you were born into is usually the class you stay in. Rich people can afford private schools, tutors, sat prep courses for a test you "can't study for" among other things. They also have friends and family that are alumni of elite schools and hold high positions in companies.

This means important positions of power aren't being filled by the best and brightest we have to offer but by individuals that were simply born into it.

tk217
12-26-2010, 08:01 PM
I was watching a blip on the news videos about a large number of fortune five hundred public companies in the private sector talking recently about "jobs" in America.

They basically stated that America was not educating their workers or developing the skills to fulfill the positions of the future.

To me I thought this was perhaps the most retarded thing I have ever heard.

Claiming that America -- one of the best educated and most inventive societies on this planet -- did not have the "skills" required for the future.

It blew me away.

To me what I really saw was a "blind justification" with no merit for companies to hide behind claims of profit margins by hiring cheap labor in foreign locations.

What was pathetic was that the news commentators never asked these CEO's -- what are these jobs that American's can't do?

Never once did they ask this question.

To your point -- yes -- I believe you are fairly accurate. The best and the brightest won't fill those slots because they require a lot of money to take those jobs. And like the "poor farmer" of America who claims, "I have to hire illegals... cause I can't get anyone to take this job..." but always leaves off this particular note, "At this level of pay...." The same is being claimed by our richest and most high tech of companies... "I can't get an American to fill these jobs.. (at this level of pay)." So, CEO's are hiding behind this and lobbying congress to get more foreign visas so they can bring in more workers from other countries rather than hiring local Americans "at the real wage" required.

cavymeister
12-26-2010, 08:17 PM
Not so much social classes, but the fact that you can be born into a social class. The class you were born into is usually the class you stay in. Rich people can afford private schools, tutors, sat prep courses for a test you "can't study for" among other things. They also have friends and family that are alumni of elite schools and hold high positions in companies.

This means important positions of power aren't being filled by the best and brightest we have to offer but by individuals that were simply born into it.

Why are so many small businesses growing up into large ones that compete with those ellite persons? How can a business continue to strive, on it's own, when all of the people running the ship aren't the best and brightest? If there isn't anyone there to prop them up, and they aren't the moe efficient run business, wouldn't they fail (or at least reduce in size/market share) and another take it's place? A ****tily run company will only run so long. The beauty of the idea of America isn't that when you're on top, you're there for good. It's that anyone can get to the top, so long as there's no intervention to keep a failing company afloat when they deserve to lose a little/lot.

Christianyouth
12-26-2010, 08:24 PM
That's such a vague question that no one knows what it means, "inhibiting our progress as a society". But from what you said, it sounds like you're just saying it's messed up because kids with wealthy parents stay wealthy?

Can't get good answers from vague questions

DeadDumbbell501
12-26-2010, 08:25 PM
Not so much social classes, but the fact that you can be born into a social class. The class you were born into is usually the class you stay in. Rich people can afford private schools, tutors, sat prep courses for a test you "can't study for" among other things. They also have friends and family that are alumni of elite schools and hold high positions in companies.

This means important positions of power aren't being filled by the best and brightest we have to offer but by individuals that were simply born into it.

Lol? Right... Considering we have Global Corporations that are primarily American..

The future heirs and heiresses of the corporations aren't the best and brightest, yet make 5 million a year and keep the thing running.

Yeah, they are fking smart.

tk217
12-26-2010, 08:28 PM
Lol? Right... Considering we have Global Corporations that are primarily American..

The future heirs and heiresses of the corporations aren't the best and brightest, yet make 5 million a year and keep the thing running.

Yeah, they are fking smart.

/headtilt.

You are red... so I think you are a troll... but you are also 15 so I'd be surprised if you've ever worked for a large corporation in any meaningful capacity.

DeadDumbbell501
12-26-2010, 08:41 PM
/headtilt.

You are red... so I think you are a troll... but you are also 15 so I'd be surprised if you've ever worked for a large corporation in any meaningful capacity.

Uhm, me and you discussed my Blackwater project a few nights ago... Lol.

tk217
12-26-2010, 08:53 PM
Uhm, me and you discussed my Blackwater project a few nights ago... Lol.

Then why would claim nepotism is a profound basis for running a company?

Pump that iron!
12-26-2010, 11:09 PM
Not so much social classes, but the fact that you can be born into a social class. The class you were born into is usually the class you stay in. Rich people can afford private schools, tutors, sat prep courses for a test you "can't study for" among other things. They also have friends and family that are alumni of elite schools and hold high positions in companies.

This means important positions of power aren't being filled by the best and brightest we have to offer but by individuals that were simply born into it.

This reminds me of what Sherri Sherrod said in that now infamous NCAAP speech - it ain't about race, it's about rich and poor. Kind of off topic but that's just what this reminded me of.

People who benefit from this kind of system are always the quickest to downplay, rationalize, and justify it. The sad truth is that in countries like Canada and the U.S., this kind of institutionalised kind of caste system still exists much like you describe it. There are real institutional barriers for equality of opporunity. That's what it really is all about - people who shudder and downplay the call for equality mistake what people should have. It's not about equality of result, nobody wants that. But we should all have equality of opportunity.