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View Full Version : Gaining Mass, with a physical demanding job.



kman711
04-25-2010, 08:58 PM
Hi, I have been off and on trying to gain mass for a few years now. This past 2 months I have gotten very serious. I have just started a new full time job that starts Monday. I will be working 50 hours a week on average, I was originally working only 25-30 hours a week. Problem Is I also have school, which is stressing me out, thinking of all the time I used to have to lift, and relax my body will be going towards this new job.

The new job is manual labor, I will be lifting lumber all day, some big lumber, and some small. The job will be lifting things all day, and getting on and off of equipment. I have experienced some of this work last week, and it def will be working my muscles 5 days a week when I should have at least some rest for them.

Does anyone out there also have a physically demanding job, and how does it effect your gains?

Thanks

determined4000
04-25-2010, 09:01 PM
Hi, I have been off and on trying to gain mass for a few years now. This past 2 months I have gotten very serious. I have just started a new full time job that starts Monday. I will be working 50 hours a week on average, I was originally working only 25-30 hours a week. Problem Is I also have school, which is stressing me out, thinking of all the time I used to have to lift, and relax my body will be going towards this new job.

The new job is manual labor, I will be lifting lumber all day, some big lumber, and some small. The job will be lifting things all day, and getting on and off of equipment. I have experienced some of this work last week, and it def will be working my muscles 5 days a week when I should have at least some rest for them.

Does anyone out there also have a physically demanding job, and how does it effect your gains?

Thanks

Eat up big time
lift fewer times per week
less cardio
shorter more intense lifting sessions (less reps, less rest, more weight)
sleep well
If feeling fatigued, take more days off

PBateman2
04-25-2010, 09:11 PM
Agree with D above. Stick to a 3 day training split. Aim for 23-25 cals per pound of bodyweight.

cinco_de_matto
04-25-2010, 10:42 PM
Just eat some extra food. Since you're doing a lot of physical labor, there's not much of a need for cardio because in a sense you're getting paid to do cardio now.

Try buying a big bag of almonds/walnuts. Then buy a box of snack bags, smaller than sandwich bags, and put about half a cup in two different bags. That way you have a higher calorie snack to eat on your breaks.

I also like to take a box of fat free milk powder, and take about 15 servings of it and mix it in another tob with 15 scoops of chocolate whey. Then I put a serving of it(it ends up being 2/3rds a cup) in one of those snack bags, and take two with me with 2 shaker cups with 1 cup of water. That way I have a scoop of whey and milk powder ready to make a chocolate and milk shake, with some almonds. Ends up around 400-500 calories with the almonds/shake. Gives me plenty of energy to work until lunch/signout time.

Simmo0508
04-26-2010, 12:46 AM
Hi, I have been off and on trying to gain mass for a few years now. This past 2 months I have gotten very serious. I have just started a new full time job that starts Monday. I will be working 50 hours a week on average, I was originally working only 25-30 hours a week. Problem Is I also have school, which is stressing me out, thinking of all the time I used to have to lift, and relax my body will be going towards this new job.

The new job is manual labor, I will be lifting lumber all day, some big lumber, and some small. The job will be lifting things all day, and getting on and off of equipment. I have experienced some of this work last week, and it def will be working my muscles 5 days a week when I should have at least some rest for them.

Does anyone out there also have a physically demanding job, and how does it effect your gains?

Thanks

Realistically, obviously increase your overall calories and increase portion sizes to counteract the higher daily physical activity.

However ideally, quit that demanding job and get a less active job. Bodybuilding in itself and gaining muscle and building your base when you're a newbie is a job in it's own right. It takes up a ton of your time. The eating, the cooking, the prepping, the training. You need to put the actual hours into it and dedicate parts of your life to it. So with that, you obviously need to make some sacrifices.

Having an overly active lifestyle is suicide to a bulk (at your current shape).

jorgerod
04-26-2010, 03:01 AM
Hi, I have been off and on trying to gain mass for a few years now. This past 2 months I have gotten very serious. I have just started a new full time job that starts Monday. I will be working 50 hours a week on average, I was originally working only 25-30 hours a week. Problem Is I also have school, which is stressing me out, thinking of all the time I used to have to lift, and relax my body will be going towards this new job.

The new job is manual labor, I will be lifting lumber all day, some big lumber, and some small. The job will be lifting things all day, and getting on and off of equipment. I have experienced some of this work last week, and it def will be working my muscles 5 days a week when I should have at least some rest for them.

Does anyone out there also have a physically demanding job, and how does it effect your gains?

Thanks

Jay Cutler started hauling cement around and look where he's at. They will eventually get used to the amount of stress put on by work. In the beginning don't over abuse them with extra gym workouts, eventually you'll be doing both things.

Jorge

TyrusJB
04-26-2010, 07:29 AM
Jay Cutler started hauling cement around and look where he's at. They will eventually get used to the amount of stress put on by work. In the beginning don't over abuse them with extra gym workouts, eventually you'll be doing both things.

Jorge

My job is pretty similar, lifting heavy boxes, copiers, moving around 800lb filing cabinets, busting ass to load trailers.. pushing all items on a cart to their destination.

I've always been active and lifting weights, but I started after 2 years off, and a few months of working out again before my first day a year ago.

at first you are totally exhausted and can hardly do anything outside of work.. but I still managed to get heavy squats in throughout all alst year... but really, I don't feel like those heavy sessions after hard days were worth it. totally overtrained, cranky, could hardly get myself out of bed in the morning, and my joints took too much of a beating without enough rest.

Like jorge mentioned... my advice would be to focus on nervous system training. 1-3 reps with maybe 4-5 sets at most of some whole body compound lift... squat, deadlift for example.

that way.. you won't deplete your muscles completely cause that takes a good day or two to recover from while you're busting ass at work... and that is just too painful to maintain for long.

so, work on strength, upping numbers without going to exhaustion.. you'll be getting that high volume stuff from your job. Use the muscle and nervous system strength from those lifts in the lighter stuff you do at work all day. That feels pretty good.

What I've noticed from light-moderate labor all day? my joints are much stronger. Hand ligaments.. shoulder strength

I eat real lite during the day.. eggs, chicken, beef.. using 1-2 bananas for energy, maybe some orange juice, or possibly chew on some raw oatmeal (but this inflames my joints from the omega 6)

then after work I load up on higher calories things.. Whole milk, cheese, olive oil.. 1 meal of 2-3 smaller potatoes for a good insulin surge. and make sure I drink a glass or two of milk before bed. giving the slow digesting casein a chance to work all night long.

hope it helps!