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View Full Version : Doe sit matter if you have fat post-workout?



UltimateNonStop
01-14-2010, 05:16 AM
In the guidelines it says it doesn't matter, yet I've heard nutritionists say that fat post-workout isn't recommended. I'm not 100% sure why, is it something to do with slowing down the release of fat?

At the moment I have 25-50g of mixed chopped nuts post-workout, so wondering if I should change that or not.

phal
01-14-2010, 05:18 AM
I'm fairly certain Alan knows what he's talking about.

kimm4
01-14-2010, 05:33 AM
In the guidelines it says it doesn't matter, yet I've heard nutritionists say that fat post-workout isn't recommended. I'm not 100% sure why, is it something to do with slowing down the release of fat?

At the moment I have 25-50g of mixed chopped nuts post-workout, so wondering if I should change that or not.

People tend to worry too much about pre/post workout meals. The main focus should be getting in your calories with healthy balanced foods through out the day.

You're fine.

snorkelman
01-14-2010, 05:34 AM
I am NOT a bro who recommends avoiding fat post workout, but from what I gather, the bros who do recommend this macronutrient timing avoidance seem to justify their belief that it is optimal to get the protein into the muscle at warp speed, and using high GI carbs often goes hand in hand, with the explanation being that the high GI carbs will top off the "depleted" glycogen stores, and if you added fat to the meal/shake, that would slow everything down.

However, aside from the uncertainly of whether glycogen was even depleted to being with, there is the question of why you would need to replentish it by going out of your way by selecting certain types of carbs and excluding fat.

I don't mean to steer your thread into the controversial quagmire of high GI carbs but I just don't see any other argument for fat avoidance postworkout.


You may like to see this bit of research which involved 165 grams of fat not preventing glycogen from being fully replentished within 24 hours.

Adding fat calories to meals after exercise does not alter glucose tolerance. Fox AK, Kaufman AE, Horowitz JF. J Appl Physiol. 2004 Jul;97(1):11-6. Epub 2004 Feb 20.
PMID: 14978010 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Abstract at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14978010?ordinalpos=12&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsP anel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

DJSTARER
01-14-2010, 05:42 AM
look at your dietary situation as a whole to find the answer. If you're attempting to gain weight, make sure your energy and nitrogen balance is positive as much as possible.

UltimateNonStop
01-14-2010, 06:06 AM
Thanks for the replies people, looks like its not something I should worry about, I am currently cutting, and then plan to stay at maintenance level, adding muscle slowly. I would say that my meals are pretty well balanced, albeit a slightly higher calorie and carb meal at breakfast, pre-workout and post-workout, but thats about all.

GetShredded
01-14-2010, 06:18 AM
You seem to have a spelling issue with all the titles you post in the forums, proof reading helps.

Alan > Rest of us

TitanFB11
01-14-2010, 06:21 AM
I am NOT a bro who recommends avoiding fat post workout, but from what I gather, the bros who do recommend this macronutrient timing avoidance seem to justify their belief that it is optimal to get the protein into the muscle at warp speed, and using high GI carbs often goes hand in hand, with the explanation being that the high GI carbs will top off the "depleted" glycogen stores, and if you added fat to the meal/shake, that would slow everything down.

However, aside from the uncertainly of whether glycogen was even depleted to being with, there is the question of why you would need to replentish it by going out of your way by selecting certain types of carbs and excluding fat.

I don't mean to steer your thread into the controversial quagmire of high GI carbs but I just don't see any other argument for fat avoidance postworkout.


You may like to see this bit of research which involved 165 grams of fat not preventing glycogen from being fully replentished within 24 hours.

Adding fat calories to meals after exercise does not alter glucose tolerance. Fox AK, Kaufman AE, Horowitz JF. J Appl Physiol. 2004 Jul;97(1):11-6. Epub 2004 Feb 20.
PMID: 14978010 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Abstract at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14978010?ordinalpos=12&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsP anel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum


ive come to learn this guy is smart lol.

thats being said, ya i dont belive it matters to much. people overlook the fact that you SHOULD have had a preworkout meal or something with carbs/cals/protein anyway so to want to get in nutrients 4 sec after your last set and being afraid of fat slowing the process down makes little sence.

what if i had a gallon of chocomilk 30min preoworkout...you honestly think ill need more carbs and protein immediatly pwo that i need to digest super quick?.......no, unless i trained with ronnie coleman for 3 hours and biked 4km with lance armstrong. so the idea fats slow down digestion abosorbtion rate really dosent matter unless your training on a empty stomach and even then, dailymacros mean more then how fast ill digest my pwo lol.

i could finish my last set and down 50g of vitargo with nothing else as soon as i get off the bench and not eat anything else the rest of the day.so absorbtion rate didnt mean ****.

just my oponion tho...

UltimateNonStop
01-14-2010, 07:54 AM
You seem to have a spelling issue with all the titles you post in the forums, proof reading helps.

Alan > Rest of us

Yeah, sorry about that, I'll try and avoid it in future. I'll take Alan's advice then! And cheers TitanFB11, I see what you're saying, I never train on an empty stomach now if I do a morning workout, at least try to get a banana in me or something, and as you said daily nutrition is more important.

bartenda
01-14-2010, 08:34 AM
I eat PB post workout. Doesnt matter.