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View Full Version : Raw eggs and salmonella?



Insight
12-27-2009, 11:55 AM
Is it just a myth?

BigSnacks
12-27-2009, 12:17 PM
I thought that all eggs sold in cartons were supposed to be pasteurized, which would prevent (or, at the very least, deter) salmonella, but I don't know if that makes them completely safe.

I tried a version of an egg creme several months ago that called for 1 or 2 whole eggs blended in. It was good as hell, but within an hour I was experiencing extremely severe stomach/abdomen pains. I haven't tried it again since...

in10city
12-27-2009, 12:26 PM
Not a myth. It's about probablities. The only myth is that there will be a day that doesn't have a raw egg question.

krott5333
12-27-2009, 12:56 PM
I think the chance of salmonella is less likely with organic eggs.

BloodRaged
12-27-2009, 12:56 PM
Is it just a myth?

It's true, but there are various ways to effect the risk levels.

Natural eggs are better, and some say to wash the shells before you open them.

It's said that salmonella comes from sick chickens, that's why the risk with natural eggs are supposed to be lower then the other.

I used to drink the **** out of them and when I get some ****ing money again I'm probably going to go back to doing it because I get tired of eating cooked eggs all the ****ing time.

Need to mix it up, I love yolks but **** egg whites... nasty ****ing pos egg whites.

:)

Anyway, that's my 2 cents.

krott5333
12-27-2009, 01:22 PM
raw eggs in milk is so yummy, tastes like egg nog

icetrauma
12-27-2009, 01:24 PM
IIRC you have a 1:10000 chance of getting salmonella per egg.

Fiz-iks
12-27-2009, 01:35 PM
"Bacteria can be on the outside of a shell egg. That's because the egg exits the hen's body through the same passageway as feces is excreted. That's why eggs are washed and sanitized at the processing plant. Bacteria can be inside an uncracked, whole egg. Contamination of eggs may be due to bacteria within the hen's ovary or oviduct before the shell forms around the yolk and white. SE doesn't make the hen sick. It is also possible for eggs to become infected by Salmonella Enteritidis fecal contamination through the pores of the shells after they're laid."

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Factsheets/Focus_On_Shell_Eggs/index.asp

BloodRaged
12-27-2009, 01:39 PM
raw eggs in milk is so yummy, tastes like egg nog

**** that ****, raw eggs don't mix well with milk... unless you are talking about blending them up or something.

I tried drinking them whole in chocolate milk once and it was like oil and vinegar they didn't mix lol.

I do like drinking them with v8 vegi juice though, just a little v8 and swish.

krott5333
12-27-2009, 01:53 PM
**** that ****, raw eggs don't mix well with milk... unless you are talking about blending them up or something.

I tried drinking them whole in chocolate milk once and it was like oil and vinegar they didn't mix lol.

I do like drinking them with v8 vegi juice though, just a little v8 and swish.

well I used skim milk powder and water, and mixed with a fork, seemed to work well.

Defiled
12-27-2009, 03:15 PM
very low chance, especially if you are getting good quality eggs.

x-ray vision
12-27-2009, 04:37 PM
Is it just a myth?
Is what a myth? Are you asking if one is more likely to get salmonella poisoning from eating raw eggs than cooked? If so, it's not a myth. Heat kills salmonella bacteria. However, you're chances of getting salmonella poisoning from eggs are extremely low.


Salmonella bacteria are found in the intestinal tracts of animals, birds, reptiles, insects and humans. Salmonella may be found on the outside of the egg shell before the egg is washed or it may be found inside the egg if the hen was infected. It is estimated that one egg in 20,000 eggs may contain Salmonella which is a 0.005% contamination rate. Eggs contain natural antimicrobial substances in the egg white, and all eggs are washed and sanitized before they are packed. Egg recipes properly prepared in individual servings and promptly eaten are rarely a problem. Inadequate refrigeration, improper handling and insufficient cooking are all factors that have contributed to disease outbreaks. Salmonella is destroyed by heat. Eggs that have been handled and cooked properly should not cause human illness.
http://www.eggsafety.org/f_a_q.htm


I think the chance of salmonella is less likely with organic eggs.
I'm sure you'll find that claim made all over the internet, but one must be careful of their source. I trust the NCBI for not posting anything that can't be backed up with reliable data.


Many consumers assume that broiler chickens grown under traditional commercial conditions will have more Salmonella than free-range or organic chickens, which usually are less crowded, have access to outside spaces during grow out, and are fed special diets. Despite these perceptions, there is a lack of published information about the microbiological status of free-range and organic chickens. A total of 135 processed free-range chickens from four different commercial free-range chicken producers were sampled in 14 different lots for the presence of Salmonella. Overall, 9 (64%) of 14 lots and 42 (31%) of 135 of the carcasses were positive for Salmonella. No Salmonella were detected in 5 of the 14 lots, and in one lot 100% of the chickens were positive for Salmonella. An additional 53 all-natural (no meat or poultry meal or antibiotics in the feed) processed chickens from eight lots were tested; 25% of the individual chickens from 37% of these lots tested positive for Salmonella. Three lots of chickens from a single organic free-range producer were tested, and all three of the lots and 60% of the individual chickens were positive for Salmonella.The U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service reported that commercial chickens processed from 2000 to 2003 had a Salmonella prevalence rate of 9.1 to 12.8%. Consumers should not assume that free-range or organic conditions will have anything to do with the Salmonella status of the chicken.