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View Full Version : AKR is fraduin and plagiarizing



k3v
09-03-2009, 01:44 PM
Notice all the "?".. that's caused when you copy and paste an article off the web..

prove me wrong

http://i32.tinypic.com/s59x6r.jpg

YARDGORILLA
09-03-2009, 01:45 PM
That's Debatable.

MrGuitar
09-03-2009, 01:45 PM
he may type it in ms word first

TheStender
09-03-2009, 01:45 PM
Notice all the "?".. that's caused when you copy and paste an article off the web..

prove me wrong

http://i32.tinypic.com/s59x6r.jpg

It can happen when you type it up in another document editor, then copy and paste into a post...

IraHays
09-03-2009, 01:46 PM
All it means is that he typed it up in Word.

Melkor
09-03-2009, 01:46 PM
He likely copied and pasted it from a Word document or something so that he could proof read it before he posted.

Queequeg
09-03-2009, 01:46 PM
Type ' in word then copy and past = ?

TheStender
09-03-2009, 01:47 PM
Type ' in word then copy and past = ?

= Fail thread?

Queequeg
09-03-2009, 01:47 PM
He likely copied and pasted it from a Word document or something so that he could proof read it before he posted.

great minds see the truth


= Fail thread?

no = a question mark because bb code dosn't recognise that character

Rune
09-03-2009, 01:50 PM
Notice all the "?".. that's caused when you copy and paste an article off the web..

prove me wrong

If you look at mine they're all over the place too... because I wrote it in word and pasted it.

TheStender
09-03-2009, 01:50 PM
no = a question mark because bb code dosn't recognise that character

Exactly.

?

k3v
09-03-2009, 01:51 PM
BRB, making a story on word.

edit:

on the ground. After a while he lifted his head, pointed up the road with the end of the whip, and said--
"The idiot!"
The sun was shining violently upon the undulating surface of the land. The rises were topped by clumps of meagre trees, with their branches showing high on the sky as if they had been perched upon stilts. The small fields, cut up by hedges and stone walls that zig-zagged over the slopes, lay in rectangular patches of vivid greens and yellows, resembling the unskilful daubs of a naive picture. And the landscape was divided in two by the white streak of a road stretching in long loops far away, like a river of dust crawling out of the hills on its way to the sea.
"Here he is," said the driver, again.
In the long grass bordering the road a face glided past the carriage at the level of the wheels as we drove slowly by. The imbecile face was red, and the bullet head with close-cropped hair seemed to lie alone, its chin in the dust. The body was lost in the bushes growing thick along the bottom of the deep ditch.
It was a boy's face. He might have been sixteen, judging from the size--perhaps less, perhaps more. Such creatures are forgotten by time, and live untouched by years till death gathers them up into its compassionate bosom; the faithful death that never forgets in the press of work the most insignificant of its children.
"Ah! there's another," said the man, with a certain satisfaction in his tone, as if he had caught sight of something expected.
There was another. That one stood nearly in the middle of the road in the blaze of sunshine at the end of his own short shadow. And he stood with hands pushed into the opposite sleeves of his long coat, his head sunk between the shoulders, all hunched up in the flood of heat. From a distance he had the aspect of one suffering from intense cold.
"Those are twins," explained the driver.
The idiot shuffled two paces out of the way and looked at us over his shoulder when we brushed past him. The glance was unseeing and staring, a fascinated glance; but he did not turn to look after us. Probably the image passed before the eyes without leaving any trace on the misshapen brain of the creature. When we had topped the ascent I looked over the hood. He stood in the road just where we had left him.
The driver clambered into his seat, clicked his tongue, and we went downhill. The brake squeaked horribly from time to time. At the foot he eased off the noisy mechanism and said, turning half round on his box--
"We shall see some more of them by-and-by."
"More idiots? How many of them are there, then?" I asked.
"There's four of them--children of a farmer near Ploumar here. . . . The parents are dead now," he added, after a while. "The grandmother lives on the farm. In the daytime they knock about on this road, and they come home at dusk along with the cattle. . . . It's a good farm."
We saw the other two: a boy and a girl, as the driver said. They were dressed exactly alike, in shapeless garments with petticoat-like skirts. The imperfect thing that lived within them moved those beings to howl at us from the top of the bank, where they sprawled amongst the tough stalks of furze. Their cropped black heads stuck out from the bright yellow wall of countless small blossoms. The faces were purple with the strain of yelling; the voices sounded blank and cracked like a mechanical imitation of old people's voices; and suddenly ceased when we turned into a lane.
I saw them many times in my wandering about the country. They lived on that road, drifting along its length here and there, according to the inexplicable impulses of their monstrous darkness. They were an offence to the sunshine, a reproach to empty heaven, a blight on the concentrated and purposeful vigour of the wild landscape. In time the story of their parents shaped itself before me out of the listless answers to my questions, out of the indifferent words heard in wayside inns or on the very road those idiots haunted. Some of it was told by an emaciated and sceptical old fellow with a tremendous whip, while we trudged together over the sands by the side of a two-wheeled cart loaded with dripping seaweed. Then at other times other people confirmed and completed the story: till it stood at last before me, a tale formidable and simple, as they always are, those disclosures of obscure trials endured by ignorant hearts.
When he returned from his military service Jean-Pierre Bacadou found the old people very much aged. He remarked with pain that the work of the farm was not satisfactorily done. The father had not the energy of old days. The hands did not feel over them the eye of the master. Jean-Pierre noted with sorrow that the heap of manure in the courtyard before the only entrance to the house was not so large as it should have been. The fences were out of repair, and the cattle suffered from neglect. At home the mother was practically bedridden, and the girls chattered loudly in the big kitchen, unrebuked, from morning to night. He said to himself: "We must change all this." He talked the matter over with his father one evening when the rays of the setting sun entering the yard between the outhouses ruled the heavy shadows with luminous streaks. Over the manure heap floated a mist, opal-tinted and odorous, and the marauding hens would stop in their scratching to examine with a sudden glance of their round eye the two men, both lean and tall, talking in hoarse tones. The old man, all twisted with rheumatism and bowed with years of work, the younger bony and straight, spoke without gestures in the indifferent manner of peasants, grave and slow. But before the sun had set the father had submitted to the sensible arguments of the son. "It is not for me that I am speaking," insisted Jean-Pierre. "It is for the land. It's a pity to see it badly used. I am not impatient for myself." The old fellow nodded over his stick. "I dare say; I dare say," he muttered. "You may be right. Do what you like. It's the mother that will be pleased."
The mother was pleased with her daughter-in-law. Jean-Pierre brought the two-wheeled spring-cart with a rush into the yard. The gray horse galloped clumsily, and the bride and bridegroom, sitting side by side, were jerked backwards and forwards by the up and down motion of the shafts, in a manner regular and brusque. On the road the distanced wedding guests straggled in pairs and groups. The men advanced with heavy steps, swinging their idle arms. They were clad in town clothes; jackets cut with clumsy smartness, hard black hats, immense boots, polished highly. Their women all in simple black, with white caps and shawls of faded tints folded triangularly on the back, strolled lightly by their side. In front the violin sang a strident tune, and the biniou snored and hummed, while the player capered solemnly, lifting high his heavy clogs. The sombre procession drifted in and out of the narrow lanes, through sunshine and through shade, between fields and hedgerows, scaring the little birds that darted away in troops right and left. In the yard of Bacadou's farm the dark ribbon wound itself up into a mass of men and women pushing at the door with cries and greetings. The wedding dinner was remembered for months. It was a splendid feast in the orchard. Farmers of considerable means and excellent repute were to be found sleeping in ditches, all along the road to Treguier, even as late as the afternoon of the next day. All the countryside participated in the happiness of Jean-Pierre. He remained sober, and, together with his quiet wife, kept out of the way, letting father and mother reap their due of honour and thanks. But the next day he took hold strongly, and the old folks felt a shadow--precursor of the grave--fall upon them finally. The world is to the young.
When the twins were born there was plenty of room in the house, for the mother of Jean-Pierre had gone away to dwell under a heavy stone in the cemetery of Ploumar. On that day, for the first time since his son's marriage, the elder Bacadou, neglected by the cackling lot of strange women who thronged the kitchen, left in the morning his seat under the mantel of the fireplace, and went into the empty cow-house, shaking his white locks dismally. Grandsons were all very well, but he wanted his soup at midday. When shown the babies, he stared at them with a fixed gaze, and muttered something like: "It's too much." Whether he meant too much happiness, or simply commented upon the number of his descendants, it is impossible to say. He looked offended --as far as his old wooden face could express anything; and for days afterwards could be seen, almost any time of the day, sitting at the gate, with his nose over his knees, a pipe between his gums, and gathered up into a kind of raging concentrated sulkiness. Once he spoke to his son, alluding to the newcomers with a groan: "They will quarrel over the land." "Don't bother about that, father," answered Jean-Pierre, stolidly, and passed, bent double, towing a recalcitrant cow over his shoulder.
He was happy, and so was Susan, his wife. It was not an ethereal joy welcoming new souls to struggle, perchance to victory. In fourteen years both boys would be a help; and, later on, Jean-Pierre pictured two big sons striding over the land from patch to patch, wringing tribute from the earth beloved and fruitful. Susan was happy too, for she did not want to be spoken of as the unfortunate woman, and now she had children no one could call her that. Both herself and her husband had seen something of the larger world--he during the time of his service; while she had spent a year or so in Paris with a Breton family; but had been too home-sick to remain longer away from the hilly and green country, set in a barren circle of rocks and sands, where she had been born. She thought that one of the boys ought perhaps to be a priest, but said nothing to her husband, who was a republican, and hated the "crows," as he called the ministers of religion. The christening was a splendid affair. All the commune came to it, for the Bacadous were rich and influential, and, now and then, did not mind the expense. The grandfather had a new coat.
Some months afterwards, one evening when the kitchen had been swept, and the door locked, Jean-Pierre, looking at the cot, asked his wife: "What's the matter with those children?" And, as if these words, spoken calmly, had been the portent of misfortune, she answered with a loud wail that must have been heard across the yard in the pig-sty; for the pigs (the Bacadous had the finest pigs in the country) stirred and grunted complainingly in the night. The husband went on grinding his bread and butter slowly, gazing at the wall, the soup-plate smoking under his chin. He had returned late from the market, where he had overheard (not for the first time) whispers behind his back. He revolved the words in his mind as he drove back. "Simple! Both of them. . . . Never any use! . . . Well! May be, may be. One must see. Would ask his wife." This was her answer. He felt like a blow on his chest, but said only: "Go, draw me some cider. I am thirsty!"
She went out moaning, an empty jug in her hand. Then he arose, took up the light, and moved slowly towards the cradle. They slept. He looked at them sideways, finished his mouthful there, went back heavily, and sat down before his plate. When his wife returned he never looked up, but swallowed a couple of spoonfuls noisily, and remarked, in a dull manner--

IraHays
09-03-2009, 01:52 PM
Op gets owned

decides to troll his own thread


epic.

kvk1
09-03-2009, 01:55 PM
lmao...astronomical failure

prove me wrong!

jackass

YARDGORILLA
09-03-2009, 01:59 PM
I've seen this before,












right before the lights went out. FAIL

ZenBowman
09-03-2009, 02:00 PM
It can happen if he edited it in an editor with a different character encoding scheme.

AKR
09-03-2009, 02:01 PM
lullz. Rune is plagiarizing as well then. :D

I've ran my stuff through, like, 2 or three different file types. I don't have word on my computer, so I write in a .txt file and have some stuff in a .doc file. Then, I take it to work where the computer has word, put it into that to help spell check, and then, it automatically gets turned back into .doc when I get on my computer. If you think I need to plagiarize, go look at everything concerning free will under my name. I have an 8 page, single spaced document I put in one thread, and plenty of other posts.

Edit: I guess Rune and I have a secret source on the web that we know about but google doesn't. That's why the OP can't find either of our posts anywhere else online. We're so sneaky.

Rune
09-03-2009, 02:04 PM
lullz. Rune is plagiarizing as well then. :D

writing = hard.

c&p = easy.

what can I say. :(

AKR
09-03-2009, 02:05 PM
If you look at mine they're all over the place too... because I wrote it in word and pasted it.

Oh, give it up. They caught us having a c+p war. :(

Melkor
09-03-2009, 02:05 PM
lullz. Rune is plagiarizing as well then. :D

I've ran my stuff through, like, 2 or three different file types. I don't have word on my computer, so I write in a .txt file and have some stuff in a .doc file. Then, I take it to work where the computer has word, put it into that to help spell check, and then, it automatically gets turned back into .doc when I get on my computer. If you think I need to plagiarize, go look at everything concerning free will under my name. I have an 8 page, single spaced document I put in one thread, and plenty of other posts.


writing = hard.

c&p = easy.

what can I say. :(

Reported to Arlecchino for legal retribution.

Queequeg
09-03-2009, 02:09 PM
Exactly.

?

gotcha! sorry thought you ment formal debate thread

AKR
09-03-2009, 02:11 PM
Reported to Arlecchino for legal retribution.


Fuuuuuuuuuuuuuu


I better get out of here, though. Just in case this thread starts to debate our actual debate topic.

RekaW
09-03-2009, 02:11 PM
I think people should find the source of plagiarism before being so quick to point the stinky finger.

After proof, then by all means, open season.

blananana4
09-03-2009, 02:11 PM
hmmm

neekz0r
09-03-2009, 02:16 PM
Fuuuuuuuuuuuuuu


I better get out of here, though. Just in case this thread starts to debate our actual debate topic.

Not like you can help yourself.











:D

Boffman
09-03-2009, 02:18 PM
Copying from Microsoft Word does that, dumbass.

_TG_
09-03-2009, 03:37 PM
this is one of the worst fails i've seen in a while.

nutsy54
09-03-2009, 03:53 PM
Regardless of the text source, people who can't take the time to Edit in the proper punctuation simply show that they really don't care about the information being presented. (Which makes it hard to believe they typed it all up from scratch to begin with).

iamlegend
09-03-2009, 05:07 PM
akr, rune:


Wanted to give you two serious props for the work you guys have done for our edification. Thanks.

peace

IVEverLow
09-03-2009, 05:12 PM
in b4 fbi

Arlecchino
09-03-2009, 05:17 PM
He typed it in word first, moron.

Next time you wish to make a criminal accusation, you might try pulling your head out of your ass first. Everybody is so quick to try and act like they are the Sherlock Holmes of teh intrawebz without stopping to think before they post.

Arlecchino
09-03-2009, 05:18 PM
OP: You have 12 hours to show me where he copied it from.