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View Full Version : Childhood Poverty May Have Permanent Biological Legacy



ElHombre
07-15-2009, 06:36 AM
makes sense. more stress => changes in gene regulation in response => kid gets worn down.


The biological legacy of childhood poverty may linger for decades, leaving adults who grew up poor more likely to get sick.

Genome scans of 103 adults found altered patterns of stress-related gene activity in those from low-income backgrounds. The patterns persisted even when poverty was left behind.

The findings, published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could explain why heart disease, cancer and other diseases of aging appear to be unusually common in adults who grew up poor, regardless of their current income or lifestyles.

Extra stress hormone production ostensibly helps poor kids deal with hardships, from unsafe neighborhoods to bad schools to at-home worries. But those hormones could produce heightened levels of inflammation, ultimately leaving their immune systems weakened and vulnerable.

Nutrition, exposure to environmental chemicals and disease could also explain these long-term biological effects. ?We are unable to determine the relative importance of these exposures here, but doing so needs to be one of the top priorities for future research in this area,? write the researchers.

In another study published in PNAS in March, researchers found links between childhood poverty, physiological stress and adult memory. Taken together, the findings suggest that economic inequalities are not just economic

link to paper in below link:
http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2009/07/povertybio/

Arbex
07-15-2009, 06:47 AM
This isn't a surprise.

I've said it countless times -- denying abortion = epic failure for parent/s and child/children.

user5145
07-15-2009, 07:22 AM
Good post, that is definitely some interesting stuff. Who knew the enironment could have such a huge effect on you.

YARDGORILLA
07-15-2009, 07:34 AM
Is not poverty a creation of man?
Let religious do-gooders fix it through charitable works, otherwise, let them evolve as thier environment and corresponding family/pack allow.

tnel00
07-15-2009, 10:26 AM
This isn't a surprise.

I've said it countless times -- denying abortion = epic failure for parent/s and child/children.

unfortunately poor women feel that having a child will give them "something". that's one reason why there are more children born to poor single mothers rather than wealthy single mothers.

YARDGORILLA
07-16-2009, 10:23 AM
lol. i'm sure you'd have a different opinion if you grew up in the projects.

LET ME FILL YOU IN ON SOMETHING, I AM BORN and RAISED IN THE PROJECTS.
EAST BALTIMORE.
FUCCK YOU.

SaviorSix
07-16-2009, 10:25 AM
LET ME FILL YOU IN ON SOMETHING, I AM BORN and RAISED IN THE PROJECTS.
EAST BALTIMORE.
FUCCK YOU.

How realistic is The Wire?

YARDGORILLA
07-16-2009, 10:28 AM
How realistic is The Wire?

Very. It is actually based on real individuals on the police force, the streets, and politically.
I actually taught high school at Western High School for several years, and 100% convey the accuracy of the portrayal of the classrooms and the dynamics of the students and teachers in Baltimore.