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View Full Version : Eating Tilapia raw? Do the nutrients change?



HardWork00
05-22-2009, 11:12 PM
Or semi raw I guess? My uncle made this dish tonight(forgot the name) where he did not actually cook the tilapia but squeezed lime juice on it and claimed the lime juice cooks the tilapia. Am I still getting the same nutrients or is anything affected/altered? especially the protein content since im lacking on protein a bit today.

Confuzzl3dOn3
05-22-2009, 11:41 PM
It stays the same, though about eating it raw i'd watch out. Could easily get salmonella or other bacteria, etc that cause gastroenteritis. It'd probably be safe if you cooked it but then again I luv my jap sashimi so who am i to talk :P

brad_stiles
05-22-2009, 11:55 PM
It stays the same, though about eating it raw i'd watch out. Could easily get salmonella or other bacteria, etc that cause gastroenteritis. It'd probably be safe if you cooked it but then again I luv my jap sashimi so who am i to talk :Pbeing an Alaskan and having alot of experience with white fish, it is true that lime will thoroughly cook fish. A common recipe is ceviche, and it is absolutely delicious. We normally use halibut for the recipe, but it would work without a doubt on tilapia. The most important thing is the amount of time u allow the fish to marianate in the lime juice, 12-18 hours for the recipe we use. Good luck!

HardWork00
05-23-2009, 12:03 AM
being an Alaskan and having alot of experience with white fish, it is true that lime will thoroughly cook fish. A common recipe is ceviche, and it is absolutely delicious. We normally use halibut for the recipe, but it would work without a doubt on tilapia. The most important thing is the amount of time u allow the fish to marianate in the lime juice, 12-18 hours for the recipe we use. Good luck!

Thank you. THats what it was called, ceviche.

Confuzzl3dOn3
05-23-2009, 12:32 AM
being an Alaskan and having alot of experience with white fish, it is true that lime will thoroughly cook fish. A common recipe is ceviche, and it is absolutely delicious. We normally use halibut for the recipe, but it would work without a doubt on tilapia. The most important thing is the amount of time u allow the fish to marianate in the lime juice, 12-18 hours for the recipe we use. Good luck!

Cool. WIll try that sometime maybe. Can you link me to a site or something with a recipe?

Brendon9686
05-23-2009, 05:08 AM
Most likely what you had was called a carpachio. The only time lime juice or something really acidic can "cook" a piece of meat or fish is if the protein in question is cut really thin. Otherwise, I would fully cook it. And you shouldn't be worried about the nutrients of a raw or cooked application. If you are that concerned about getting a few extra grams of protein in on any particular day, than you should take a step back and re evaluate.

NDame616
05-23-2009, 05:41 AM
Most likely what you had was called a carpachio.

Carpachio is steak. Ceviche is fish.

belairdfence99
05-23-2009, 07:39 AM
Serves 6

Ingredients:

2 pounds of tilapia fillets, diced (you can also use other white fish fillets)
1 ? cup of fresh lemon juice
1 fresh yellow hot pepper, seeded and chopped (if you can?t find it, use a habanero pepper)
? cup of celery, chopped
2 garlic cloves, chopped
2 large red onions, cut into long thing strips - julienne style
3 tablespoons of fresh cilantro, chopped
1 cup of lemon juice
Boiled corn, cut in 2 inch pieces
Boiled sweet potatoes, cut in slices
Lettuce leaves

Put the fish into a large glass bowl with the lemon juice (1 ? cup), cover, and put in the fridge for at least 2 hours.

Drain the lemon juice from the fish and add the hot pepper, celery, garlic, onions, cilantro, salt, pepper and the rest of the lemon juice (1 cup). Put in the fridge until ready to serve.

Serve the ceviche on top of lettuce leaves. Enjoy with corn and sweet potatoes on the side!

Just one I found on the internet

The_Animal11
05-23-2009, 07:45 AM
very cool, ive never heard of that before! makes sense though from a biochemical standpoint though i guess!

Dr. Horse
05-23-2009, 09:12 AM
very cool, ive never heard of that before! makes sense though from a biochemical standpoint though i guess!

Well... acid can denature proteins making the fish turn white and opaque and LOOK "cooked". But... it doesn't necessarily kill all potentially harmful microbes. I would only make ceviche with appropriate types of fish.

Brendon9686
05-23-2009, 11:43 AM
Carpachio is steak. Ceviche is fish.

Dang, thats right, good call. Get my culinary vocabulary mixed up sometimes.