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View Full Version : What does "High in protein" mean to you ?



hotsaucexdo
05-16-2009, 10:04 AM
For me, high in protein is not the amount of protein food contains per 100g, but the amount of protein it contains per 10 / 100 kcal: A lot of people wrongly say that peanuts are a good source of protein - yea, they have 20 ish grams of protein per 100 grams which is a lot, but they also have around 500 kcal per 100 grams. Skimmed Milk, on the other hand, has 3.4 grams of protein per 100 grams (mililitres) - this might sound like little, but there are 35 kcal per 100 ml. At the end if you eat 100 kcal of peanuts you would be getting 3-4 grams of protein when if you drink 100 kcal of milk you would be getting 10 grams of protein; remember this is only if you are JUST aiming towards proteins as peanuts are an excellent source for good fats.

Cheese can be another very good source of protein; even it looks it has a LOT of calories, it has a lot of protein to compensate it; a light cheese would have 280 kcal per 100 grams, but it would have around 28 grams of protein which would be at the end 10 grams of protein per 100 kcal =D, and in cottage cheese you would be able to get one which is around 15 grams of protein per 100 kcal ;).

Good quality Lean meat, chicken and tuna cannot be discussed, as they have 20+ grams of protein per 100 kcal; i would say this products are one of the best protein sources.

Beans (black, lentils, soy) and its products, like milk, have 10 + grams protein per 100 kcal which i think is realy good, and an exelent source for vegetarians - i would still say it would not be a substitute for meat.

Another thing you have to consider besides the AMOUNT of proteins is the amino acids found in them, check this link, it is pretty useful :P http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PDCAAS

If you agree or disagree feel free to give me your opinion xP

IEatPowerRacks
05-16-2009, 10:08 AM
That was pretty stupid. No duh milk doesn't have that much protein weight wise, seeing as it's mostly water... (like most beverages). We don't care. We just want to meet protein requirements. Stupid thread.

BG_1
05-16-2009, 10:13 AM
you have a point, but when I do add up my protien for the day, I just go by lean meats/eggs and protien shakes. I dont tend to bother counting the protien from bread/rice/pasta PB, as there usually quite small.

i think when people say pb is a good source of protien, there usually saying it to people who are on a bulk, who eat about 100g of it a day.

Olympique
05-16-2009, 10:17 AM
Good topic. At some point I thought there was some kind of regulation (in the U.S. at least) as to what can or cannot be labeled as "good source of protein" or "high protein", but I cannot find any references at this time.

I agree with you that the ratio of protein per calorie is the way of measuring it.

Since we usually aim for a certain 'macro split', and most of us try to get something like 30%-40% of our calories from protein, I usually find it the easiest to just take the amount of protein in grams and divide it by the number of calories. If it's around 10% (meaning 40% of calories), then it's pretty high in protein. This is just for the sake of cataloguing that specific food in my head. This has worked really well for me in the past couple of years.

Other considerations I have taken (especially when comparing food items) are the ratio of protein to sodium, and the actual cost per gram of protein per food item. But these do not necessarily determine if the food item is high in protein or not.

hotsaucexdo
05-16-2009, 01:36 PM
Good topic. At some point I thought there was some kind of regulation (in the U.S. at least) as to what can or cannot be labeled as "good source of protein" or "high protein", but I cannot find any references at this time.

I agree with you that the ratio of protein per calorie is the way of measuring it.

Since we usually aim for a certain 'macro split', and most of us try to get something like 30%-40% of our calories from protein, I usually find it the easiest to just take the amount of protein in grams and divide it by the number of calories. If it's around 10% (meaning 40% of calories), then it's pretty high in protein. This is just for the sake of cataloguing that specific food in my head. This has worked really well for me in the past couple of years.

Other considerations I have taken (especially when comparing food items) are the ratio of protein to sodium, and the actual cost per gram of protein per food item. But these do not necessarily determine if the food item is high in protein or not.

Wut bout sodium and protein??

btw what does sodium do to th human body?

Money Shot
05-16-2009, 01:45 PM
protein is what I least pay attention to because I know i am getting tons. if anything, i worry about getting too much protein

Olympique
05-16-2009, 03:36 PM
Wut bout sodium and protein??

btw what does sodium do to th human body?no concern with sodium vs. protein other than if the food product is worth consuming based on how much sodium you would have to intake in one meal in order to get enough protein.

For information on sodium and health, see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Low_sodium_diet#Health_effects_of_sodium

Brendon9686
05-16-2009, 04:59 PM
I would take into account the calories from protein out of the entire food item in question. If you make a pie chart, and the protein section takes up a good portion, then it could be considered high in protein. You bring up nuts as an example. The fat grams are obviously the defining factor when it comes to any kind of nut, so I would not consider it high in protein. Just another point of view