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redbeared
04-13-2009, 03:43 PM
Hi All,

Ive been currently experimenting with different variations of HITT as I try to slim down for the summer. I was just interested in anyone who has done HITT or who is currently doing HITT to describe which variation of the program that worked the best for them. Thanks

rockdawg21
04-13-2009, 03:47 PM
This is from a post I made last week, so hopefully it will help. I do a routine like this 3 times a week.

Here's the routine I did the other day, including resistance levels and effort levels, and the heart rates I hit at the end of each interval (some of them are rounded to make it easier in the beginning). I use a recumbent bike, and am 29 years old. At 100% effort, resistance 6, 100% effort is about 130 rpm. At resistance 3, the rest period, I do about 60 rpm.

0:00-4:30 - 4:30 warmup - 130 bpm
4:30-5:00 - 30 seconds - 100% effort - resistance 6 - 155 bpm
5:00-5:30 - 30 seconds - rest period - resistance 3 - 135 bpm
5:30-6:00 - 30 seconds - 100% effort - resistance 6 - 160 bpm
6:00-6:30 - 30 seconds - rest period - resistance 3 - 140 bpm
6:30-7:00 - 30 seconds - 100% effort - resistance 6 - 165 bpm
7:00-7:30 - 30 seconds - rest period - resistance 3 - 145 bpm
7:30-8:00 - 30 seconds - 100% effort - resistance 6 - 170 bpm
8:00-8:30 - 30 seconds - rest period - resistance 3 - 150 bpm
8:30-9:00 - 30 seconds - 100% effort - resistance 6 - 175 bpm
9:00-9:30 - 30 seconds - rest period - resistance 3 - 155 bpm
9:30-10:00 - 30 seconds - 100% effort - resistance 6 - 178 bpm
10:00-10:30 - 30 seconds - rest period - resistance 3 - 158 bpm
10:30-11:00 - 30 seconds - 100% effort - resistance 6 - 180 bpm
11:00-11:30 - 30 seconds - rest period - resistance 3 - 162 bpm
11:30-12:00 - 30 seconds - 100% effort - resistance 6 - 181 bpm
12:00-12:30 - 30 seconds - rest period - resistance 3 - 167 bpm
12:30-13:00 - 30 seconds - 100% effort - resistance 6 - 181 bpm
13:00-13:30 - 30 seconds - rest period - resistance 3 - 170 bpm
13:30-14:00 - 30 seconds - 100% effort - resistance 6 - 183 bpm
14:00-14:30 - 30 seconds - rest period - resistance 3 - 175 bpm
14:30-15:00 - 30 seconds - 100% effort - resistance 6 - 185 bpm
15:00-15:30 - 30 seconds - rest period - resistance 3 - 181 bpm
15:30-16:00 - 30 seconds - 100% effort - resistance 7 - 190 bpm
16:00-21:00 - Cooldown - 125 bpm

Average heart rate: 157 (includes warmup and cooldown)
Maximum heart rate: 190

This is a true measure of HIIT. By the time you get near the end, you should be nearing, or if you're in great shape, exceeding your calculated max heart rate and even with the 30 seconds rest, it's not going to drop much at all.

I've also done hill sprints, which is much harder than the recumbent bike, but you can still achieve great results through the example above.

It's painful, it's grueling, but you always have to be strong and push your limits.

Hope this helps :)

SocratesTX
04-13-2009, 03:57 PM
5 minute warm up
60 second all out sprint
90 second recover
Repeat 7 times
5 minute cool down

Track is best - it looks as though you are just doing interval training, not HIIT

caa5000
04-13-2009, 04:38 PM
If you've sprinted in your past (from track, football etc) I'd say follow a plan similar to mine.

warmup first then,

15 second ALL OUT sprint, 1 minute recovery jog (x8)

natescope
04-13-2009, 04:53 PM
just take your heart rate monitor and hit 95% of your max heart rate every minute, for 5 minutes, cool down for a couples minutes, then repeat for 20-25 minutes total. The whole point is to get your heart rate way up there for short periods

redbeared
04-13-2009, 06:20 PM
Thanks for the responses. I researched HITT programs for awhile before I tried it out and im making good progress I was just interested to see what programs everyone else had the best results from.

FloridaGator
04-13-2009, 06:31 PM
Swim 400m for a warm up.
Freestyle for 50m as hard as I can.
Breast Stroke 50m as slow as I can
Repeat previous 2 cycles 6 times.
Swim 200m for a cool down.

Total swim = 1200m and done within 25 minutes.

To really make gains from my HIIT ... I make sure to do LISS at least 3 times a week.

SteveFromNY
04-13-2009, 06:37 PM
fyi, it's HIIT, not HITT. High Intensity Interval Training.

o-Phantom-o
04-13-2009, 08:38 PM
Try the Body-for-LIFE Aerobics Solution. You can find more about it here: http://bodyforlife.com/exercise/cardiotraining.asp

To give you a basic overview, the exercise involves using self-perceived levels of exertion which range 1-10. 1 would mean that the current amount of difficulty for you is virtually nothing. This might include sitting on the couch. 5 would mean that you are currently working out at around 50% intensity (maybe jogging -- but it varies from person to person). 8 means that it's extremely difficult for you and you are certain you can't do it much longer before you have to stop. 9 means that its extremely difficult for you and you'd give anything just to be able to take a short break. This is the critical level. For most people, they never even experience a level 9. It's literally the hardest you have ever worked out. So what is level 10? The impossible. It's pushing yourself harder than you've ever pushed yourself. Up until right now, it's been impossible for you to exercise so hard. Level 10 means that your muscles are burning, sweat is dripping and you are breaking through a new barrier. You are using 100% concentration and focus on your exercise. Nothing else matters right now.

Here is the program:

2 minutes @ Level 5 (50% exertion - warming up)
1 minute @ Level 6 (60% exertion - getting harder)
1 min. @ Level 7 (70% exertion - moderately difficult)
1 min. @ Level 8 (80% exertion - difficult)
1 min. @ Level 9 (90% exertion - extremely difficult, almost an all out effort)
1 min. @ Level 6 (60% exertion again - feels much easier now)
1 min. @ Level 7 (70% exertion again - not bad, but not easy)
1 min. @ Level 8 (80% exertion again - not fun at all, difficult)
1 min. @ Level 9 (90% exertion again - torture, almost an all-out effort)
1 min. @ Level 6 (60% exertion again - you'd like to quit, but this feels nice for now)
1 min. @ Level 7 (70% exertion again - here we go again, not as easy as before)
1 min. @ Level 8 (80% exertion again - painful, you'd really like to stop exercising at this point but press on)
1 min. @ Level 9 (90% exertion again - virtually impossible, it's torture but you push yourself at a near all out pace)'
1 min. @ Level 6 (60% exertion - it feels fantastic at this point)
1 min. @ Level 7 (70% exertion - you start to hate this pattern and exercise)
1 min. @ Level 8 (80% exertion - at this point you are confused as to why you are doing this, but press on)
1 min. @ Level 9 (90% exertion - you hate life at this point but dig deep and increase your pace a bit more so that you are exercising near max intensity)
1 min. @ LEVEL 10!! (100% exertion - You are mentally and physically exhausted. You're dead tired. You really don't have any energy left in you. It would be so nice to just call it a day and take a nice walk to cool down. But you don't. You fight temptation. You dig deeper than you've ever dug before. You tap energy you didn't know you had and surprise yourself as you let it fly for one final minute. This is the critical moment. You have to push harder than you've ever pushed for one full minute (which will feel like an hour). You start exercising at maximum intensity with 100% focus. This is the moment you have been waiting for as you leave it all on the track.)
1 min. @ Level 5 to Level 1 (The cool down period. You start to slow way down until you are barely moving at all. Your heart is pounding and you are covered in sweat. Only 20 minutes have elapsed, but it was the most grueling 20 minutes of your entire life.)

It's short, brutal, and can be applied to any form of cardio.

NOT FOR THE FAINT OF HEART!

rockdawg21
04-13-2009, 09:15 PM
The above is a good program. I used to do that one as well :)

SocratesTX
04-14-2009, 06:46 AM
If you've sprinted in your past (from track, football etc) I'd say follow a plan similar to mine.

warmup first then,

15 second ALL OUT sprint, 1 minute recovery jog (x8)

That's it, 15 seconds? All out for 30 at least and that's if you're just getting started.

kulzor
04-14-2009, 08:00 AM
The last four weeks I've used the following HIIT routine on the elliptical:
Notes: My max heart rate is ~182. Resting is ~53.

Stretch
2 minutes get up to ~70% heart rate (e.g. (75% of max - minimum) + minimum
1 minute all-out sprint (first 30 seconds is no problem, last 30 can be extremely rough to keep up the speed). Heart rate commonly hits 175-181 during this time.
2 minutes slower jog, heart rate drops back to about 140
1 minute all-out sprint (as above)
2 minutes slower jog (as above)

In all I do 7 sprints, and finish with 2 minutes of slower jog (total of 23 minutes). Then I do a set of 15 trips down and back up my basement stairs. This takes a couple of minutes, and jacks my heart rate back up to ~178. Last 5 trips are rough.

The first two weeks of using HIIT my weight dropped more regularly than it had before, but that stopped, and my weight loss is in irregular bumps again.

AshDancer
04-14-2009, 08:55 AM
That's it, 15 seconds? All out for 30 at least and that's if you're just getting started.

If you are sprinting full-out, 15 sec is about right...I'd be willing to bet most people cannot maintain an ALL OUT sprint for much longer.

redbeared
04-14-2009, 05:19 PM
Haha yeah man I knew it was HIIT I dont know what happened....sorry for the typo

rockdawg21
04-14-2009, 05:24 PM
If you are sprinting full-out, 15 sec is about right...I'd be willing to bet most people cannot maintain an ALL OUT sprint for much longer.
Ever hear of the 200m or 400m sprint? ;)
Not that hard to do once you're in good shape :)

bifodus
04-14-2009, 06:14 PM
That's it, 15 seconds? All out for 30 at least and that's if you're just getting started.

15 seconds can be pretty intense. There's this whole "Tabata interval" thing where you go for 20 seconds, and take 10 seconds off for 8 reps, so that you can basically be done with your workout after 4 minutes. It might not be optimal, but it worked for me since I don't have a lot of patience for cardio.

BadWog
04-14-2009, 06:36 PM
Ever hear of the 200m or 400m sprint? ;)
Not that hard to do once you're in good shape :)

Nobody can sprint 400m at their top speed.

400m is far from long distance, but you still have to pace yourself.

exzile
04-14-2009, 06:52 PM
I think experimenting with a few different versions of HIIT to see what you like and your personal experiences might be helpful.

I have a hard time running on pavement (both knees reconstructed)so I do mine on a treadmill. Nothing fancy at all:

5-10 min. warmup jog @ about 5-6.0.
Then 30 sec. sprint @ 11.0 followed by 60 sec. walk @ 3.5 to get the heart rate back down.
5-10 min. cool down.

This is by no means the best, or maybe not even the "right" way. But I like it at this time, and will continue to do something similar for another month or so then switch it up to maybe bike or elliptical.

I know the HIIT guide above is quite helpful. I actually went over that to learn what I wanted to do and how to go about doing it.

EatsRainbows
04-14-2009, 07:25 PM
I use 2 different types:

1) Elliptical: I bump that SoB up to lvl19 (so much resistance you can stand on 1 tread and barely move it down)
10min total 30 seconds all out followed by 30 seconds rest (barely moving)
The ellipticals w/ movevable 'ski pole' thingies give me the best cardio since its working so much more of the body and I can compensate for when my legs give out by using my arms. I found that the ones w/ just handles (no upper body) don't work my cardiovascular system as well and I believe that research has shown the more oxygen you consume during this period is optimal for fat burning (i.e. sprinting would be best)

2)Kettlebell workout. I've been experimenting with this one. I need to buy a stop watch so I know when enough time has elapsed for rest & all out phases. Routine: Kettlebell swings 20reps -> Turkish Getups x3 on left and x3 on right repeat all three x5 times. I try to go as fast as I can and when finished w/ an excercise i wait 20 seconds and then move onto the next.

i've been using that bodyforlife method to, unknowlingly till i read this article just for 10-14 mins though.

caa5000
04-14-2009, 07:40 PM
That's it, 15 seconds? All out for 30 at least and that's if you're just getting started.

He socrates. I'm an ex-sprinter/mid distance runner (4x100m/400m). 400m, for a good sprinter is around 50 seconds (male) at the high school level. 15 seconds absolutely destroys me, I'm guessing because I have a better base/faster speed then a starter. Given I'm not in as good of a shape, I still think it really burns the hell out of me. I've wondered whether or not 15 was too short but I'll keep you updated on any progress. I find that the longer rest times allow me to go a little harder

caa5000
04-14-2009, 07:42 PM
If you are sprinting full-out, 15 sec is about right...I'd be willing to bet most people cannot maintain an ALL OUT sprint for much longer.


Agreed. I find myself slowing down around 10-12 seconds, and I'm fairly experienced (old track runner from a few years back and never really got out of shape). I generally cover about a 1/4-1/3 of a track in 15 seconds, so I'm moving pretty good.

Might slip to less than 1/4 of the track the last couple intervals :)

RCII
04-15-2009, 08:57 AM
I've been experimenting with a 30sec on and 30sec off for about 6 weeks now and seeing good results. I do my HIIT on a stationary spinning bike (I know running is better but I prefer the bike). When I first started, I didnt think I would ever be able to do a 12 minute cycle but this program worked for me.

http://musclemedia.com/training/hiit_table.asp


I do a 5 minute warmup and a 5 minute cool down as well. Is that too long or not enough? I guess it depends on the indivdual.

rockdawg21
04-15-2009, 09:08 AM
I've been experimenting with a 30sec on and 30sec off for about 6 weeks now and seeing good results. I do my HIIT on a stationary spinning bike (I know running is better but I prefer the bike).

Says who? You're getting your heart rate up to 95% of your MHR, so how is it any different for burning fat?

mingo3403
04-15-2009, 09:22 AM
Says who? You're getting your heart rate up to 95% of your MHR, so how is it any different for burning fat?

Sprinting on a truck is so much harder than sprinting on a bike or elliptical, but yes your HR goes up about the same. I'd rather run on a track, feels so much better hauling ass.

EatsRainbows
04-15-2009, 09:25 AM
Says who? You're getting your heart rate up to 95% of your MHR, so how is it any different for burning fat?

increased oxygen intake is proven to be more effecient in the oxidation of fat tissue. I'm sure its not a huge difference but for anyone looking to maximize effeciency should run. Whatever works for the individual though in terms of preference, running blows (no pun intended)

rockdawg21
04-15-2009, 09:53 AM
increased oxygen intake is proven to be more effecient in the oxidation of fat tissue. I'm sure its not a huge difference but for anyone looking to maximize effeciency should run. Whatever works for the individual though in terms of preference, running blows (no pun intended)
So, running at 95% HR makes you breathe in more oxygen than stationary cycling at 95% HR?

RCII
04-15-2009, 10:12 AM
Says who? You're getting your heart rate up to 95% of your MHR, so how is it any different for burning fat?


Got me, just what I've read on these forums. I like to add my disclaimers before anyone jumps on me for using a bike :).