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garbage cutters
01-06-2007, 05:05 PM
Albertsons sells purified drinking water bottles that are about $2 cheaper than Aquafina's bottled waters.


both are purified, so why dont more people just save money and get the albertsons one since all purified bottled waters are fairly equal?

Crunchbar
01-06-2007, 05:13 PM
there is actually a difference in distilled and nondistilled water, I have been told that you should choice non distilled over distilled or I think sometimes purified meens distilled water.

Mtguy8787
01-06-2007, 05:56 PM
not all purified water is equal. Basic purification doesn't remove everything. And certain kind of plastic are known to leech under everyday circumstances -- I don't remember the recycling # off the top of my head.

The purest are reverse osmosis or distilled. Distilled is 100% pure, because everything but the water gets left behind when the water evaporates...

I get my water from one of those 5-step filtration machines for 29 cents a gallon.. alot cheaper than buying bottles.

garbage cutters
01-06-2007, 06:24 PM
both bottles say they use reverse osmosis

i think aquafina just charges more for the name

v4lu3s
01-06-2007, 06:52 PM
distilled is what you want if you want pure water.

distillation gets more out of the water than any filtering, or reverse osmosis.

in10city
01-07-2007, 02:46 AM
Albertsons sells purified drinking water bottles that are about $2 cheaper than Aquafina's bottled waters.


both are purified, so why dont more people just save money and get the albertsons one since all purified bottled waters are fairly equal?
Read what the FDA requires for the labeling bottled water...

Code of Federal Regulations: 21 CFR 165 BEVERAGES (http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~lrd/FCF165.html)

(a) Identity--(1) Description. Bottled water is water that is
intended for human consumption and that is sealed in bottles or other
containers with no added ingredients except that it may optionally
contain safe and suitable antimicrobial agents. Fluoride may be
optionally added within the limitations established in
Sec. 165.110(b)(4)(ii). Bottled water may be used as an ingredient in
beverages (e.g., diluted juices, flavored bottled waters). It does not
include those food ingredients that are declared in ingredient labeling
as "water," "carbonated water," "disinfected water," "filtered
water," "seltzer water," "soda water," "sparkling water," and
"tonic water." The processing and bottling of bottled water shall
comply with applicable regulations in part 129 of this chapter.
(2) Nomenclature. The name of the food is "bottled water,"
"drinking water," or alternatively one or more of the following terms
as appropriate:
(i) The name of water from a well tapping a confined aquifer in
which the water level stands at some height above the top of the aquifer
is "artesian water" or "artesian well water." Artesian water may be
collected with the assistance of external force to enhance the natural
underground pressure. On request, plants shall demonstrate to
appropriate regulatory officials that the water level stands at some
height above the top of the aquifer.
(ii) The name of water from a subsurface saturated zone that is
under a pressure equal to or greater than atmospheric pressure is
"ground water." Ground water must not be under the direct influence of
surface water as defined in 40 CFR 141.2.
(iii) The name of water containing not less than 250 parts per
million (ppm) total dissolved solids (TDS), coming from a source tapped
at one or more bore holes or springs, originating from a geologically
and physically protected underground water source, may be "mineral
water." Mineral water shall be distinguished from other types of water
by its constant level and relative proportions of minerals and trace
elements at the point of emergence from the source, due account being
taken of the cycles of natural fluctuations. No minerals may be added to
this water.
(iv) The name of water that has been produced by distillation,
deionization, reverse osmosis, or other suitable processes and that
meets the definition of "purified water" in the United States
Pharmacopeia, 23d Revision, January 1, 1995, which is incorporated by
reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 551(a) and 1 CFR part 51. (Copies
may be obtained from the United States Pharmacopial Convention, Inc.,
12601 Twinbrook Pkwy., Rockville, MD 20852 and may be examined at the
Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition's Library, 5100 Paint
Branch Pkwy., College Park, MD 20740, or at the Office of the Federal
Register, 800 North Capitol St. NW., suite 700, Washington, DC), may be
"purified water" or "demineralized water." Alternatively, the water
may be called "deionized water" if the water has been processed by
deionization, "distilled water" if it is produced by distillation,
"reverse osmosis water" if the water has been processed by reverse
osmosis, and "------ drinking water" with the blank being filled in
with one of the defined terms describing the water in this paragraph
(e.g., "purified drinking water" or "deionized drinking water").
(v) The name of water that, after treatment and possible replacement
of carbon dioxide, contains the same amount of carbon dioxide from the
source that it had at emergence from the source may be "sparkling
bottled water."
(vi) The name of water derived from an underground formation from
which water flows naturally to the surface of the earth may be "spring
water." Spring water shall be collected only at

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the spring or through a bore hole tapping the underground formation
feeding the spring. There shall be a natural force causing the water to
flow to the surface through a natural orifice. The location of the
spring shall be identified. Spring water collected with the use of an
external force shall be from the same underground stratum as the spring,
as shown by a measurable hydraulic connection using a hydrogeologically
valid method between the bore hole and the natural spring, and shall
have all the physical properties, before treatment, and be of the same
composition and quality, as the water that flows naturally to the
surface of the earth. If spring water is collected with the use of an
external force, water must continue to flow naturally to the surface of
the earth through the spring's natural orifice. Plants shall
demonstrate, on request, to appropriate regulatory officials, using a
hydrogeologically valid method, that an appropriate hydraulic connection
exists between the natural orifice of the spring and the bore hole.
(vii) The name of water that meets the requirements under
"Sterility Tests" <71 in the United States Pharmacopeia,
23d Revision, January 1, 1995, which is incorporated by reference in
accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR 51. (Copies may be obtained
from the United States Pharmacopeial Convention, Inc., 12601 Twinbrook
Pkwy., Rockville, MD 20852 and may be examined at the Center for Food
Safety and Applied Nutrition's Library, 5100 Paint Branch Pkwy., College
Park, MD 20740, or at the Office of the Federal Register, 800 North
Capitol St. NW., suite 700, Washington, DC), may be "sterile water."
Alternatively, the water may be called "sterilized water."
(viii) The name of water from a hole bored, drilled, or otherwise
constructed in the ground which taps the water of an aquifer may be
"well water."