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LateStart
02-21-2003, 03:06 PM
I read the 'Maximize your results" article here http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/james1.htm
and have some quiestions. If I understand it, you should do like 3 or 4 sets of about 8 reps. When you look at the routine, he lists different exercises that target the same muscle. Don't these 'add up' to too many sets?

Also, I keep reading to build mass you have to eat like crazy and/or eat like you've never eaten before. Won't this just make me get fat?

Belle
02-21-2003, 03:21 PM
More time to target other areas...and more time for other exercises.

TwoWalks
02-21-2003, 03:25 PM
Originally posted by LateStart
I read the 'Maximize your results" article here http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/james1.htm
and have some quiestions. If I understand it, you should do like 3 or 4 sets of about 8 reps. When you look at the routine, he lists different exercises that target the same muscle. Don't these 'add up' to too many sets?

Late start There are so many different programs out there and the total number of sets vary so much from one concept to another that is a hard question to answer. I have not read the article, but will. This part of your question will be easier for someone who does the program to answer. But in general terms, probably not. Example would be if you did 4 sets X 12 reps that would be a total of 48 reps - if you did 6 sets X 8 reps that is still 48reps. Add to this the fact that one exercise for the shoulder might be for one of three areas, another exercise, even if still for the shoulder might be for another area.

Now after all the hot air, my answer is: No its not too many sets for the training program.
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Also, I keep reading to build mass you have to eat like crazy and/or eat like you've never eaten before. Won't this just make me get fat?

yesdepending on a couple of things. One the discription is a little exaggerated (Eat more than you have ever eaten) is most often true, assuming you have only eaten at maintenance or close too it. Most people that get fat are only eating about 100 calories a day over maintenance, also a lot of those calories come from saturated fats and things like donuts and coke. When you clean your diet up, then replace those calories with good food high in protien, add another 500 calories a day on top of that, you will find you are eating a huge volume of food. You will gain fat, but you will limit that by the type of food you eat and how much you allow to accumulate before cutting.

Gollum
02-21-2003, 03:39 PM
Hey LateStart,

TwoWalks hit the nail on the head.When gaining mass,you *do* have to eat quite a bit,but you have to be careful what you're eating.There is no reason to gain a tremendous amount of fat while bulking.

Something else to bear in mind is how often you are eating.You want to consume a protein rich meal every 2-3 hours.It could be as simple as a can of tuna and a few crackers or a protein shake.Having three huge meals is not the way to go.You'll do much better having 6-7 smaller meals throughout the day.

CROWLER
02-21-2003, 06:27 PM
I looked at the routine breifly.

IMO that workout routine could be ALOT better.

Too many workout days per week which means you are over taxing the central nervous system.

Too many sets per body part.

Too low a reps. He has almost all sets with 4-6 reps even with legs.


Personally I would look for a better routine it would be very easy to find.


I have a number of friends who use 'SUPER' suplements and even they would not work out this many days a week.

Charger
02-22-2003, 07:58 AM
Originally posted by LateStart
If I understand it, you should do like 3 or 4 sets of about 8 reps. When you look at the routine, he lists different exercises that target the same muscle. Don't these 'add up' to too many sets?



Latestart, I glanced through this and this routine IMO is for a more advanced lifter for one. It is intended to get you over a plateau. Another words you will get to a point where you hit a wall sort of speaking and gains will stop, this type of routine may help gains.
As for working the same muslces it worked different parts of the same muscle, this could cause a new debate. Example, inclines work the upper chest while declines work the lower.
If you are still making gains with your routine, keep doing it. If it ain't broke, don't fix it.
I change routines every 2 months or so just for this reason, to keep the body guessing and adapting. As soon as it gets used to GVT for example I switch to HIT and it's a bit of a shock to the body. Now it has to adapt to more weight, less reps.

CROWLER
02-22-2003, 03:04 PM
Originally posted by Charger

If you are still making gains with your routine, keep doing it. If it ain't broke, don't fix it.
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I agree 100%.

If you can increase either the number of reps or the amount of weight used then you are progressing and should stay with the same routine. If you are progressing in the gym but not on the scale or muscle measurements then look to your diet for improvements.