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  1. #1
    The Dude the_fake_webmaster's Avatar
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    WEEK SEVENTY-ONE :: What Can We Do To Fight Obesity?

    * Note: How can I win? Answer all questions in the order that they are asked.
    ------------------------------------------------------------

    TOPIC: What Can We Do To Fight Obesity?

    For the week of: April 6th - April 12th
    Wednesday @ Midnight Is The Final Cut (Mountain Time, US & Canada).

    -------------------------------------------------------------

    As bodybuilders we do our best to live a healthy lifestyle. Unfortunately it seems as if our race is dying out. Many people are not living a healthy lifestyle. Most of American adults are overweight or obese.

    What can we do to fight obesity?

    How important is it fighting obesity?

    What do you see in the future statistics of obesity? How did you come to this conclusion?

    BONUS QUESTION: How do you feel about child obesity? Who do you think is at fault to blame?

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    Don't discuss any other topic in this section. ONLY discuss the question above.

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  2. #2
    the beast fighter OIF's Avatar
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    What Can You Do To Fight Obesity?

    Mmmmmmm........... thats hard, how bout..............................WORKING OUT and quit eating like theres not going to be any food for the next 10 years.




    You can only motivate someone so much and lead the way but then it comes down to them.
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  3. #3
    the beast fighter OIF's Avatar
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    Child obesity?

    Well of course thats gonna be on the parents. Now if the child has a disease or symptom, well then thats a different story but if you feed you child Mcdonalds everyday and let them eat candy and junk food all day, well whos to blame. At what time does the parent take responsibility??
    Remember your soldiers, airmen, shipmates and MARINES!
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  4. #4
    No syrup for you! Staberella's Avatar
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    What can we do to fight obesity?
    A: Well the best thing to do is lead by example and be a positive influence to those around us. We can also make changes in our communities as consumers by asking the owners and/or managers of our local eateries and supermarkets to carry healthy options and products. Also, we can all band together and start taking nationwide marketing surveys and making suggestions to large corporations for healthier product lines.

    How important is it fighting obesity?
    A: It's extremely important to me, not only because it is unhealthy and unsightly but obesity costs every one of us in dollars and cents, everything from rising healthcare costs to more expensive plane tickets and fuel consumption (the heavier the load on a plane the faster it burns fuel) can be partially blamed on the obesity problem.

    What do you see in the future statistics of obesity? How did you come to this conclusion?
    A: Well, with the availability of cheaper, processed foodstuffs, the rise of affordable electronics and appliances that do everything for you with the touch of a button, better medications that prolong lives no matter how unhealthy you are and an impatient society that only cares about immediate comforts, I do not see the obesity stats going down in the near future.

    BONUS QUESTION: How do you feel about child obesity? Who do you think is at fault to blame?
    A: Ultimately, I blame the parents. As a parent I understand how hectic life with children can be especially if you are a two income family but feeding your children properly without relying on boxed, processed foods and takeout is not hard if you can think ahead and plan your meals out better. Too many people have a long list of excuses on why they CAN'T cook at home. Too busy to cook everyday? Take one day out of the week where you have an extra couple of hours, give up watching your favorite sitcom one night a week if you have to and cook your meals for the entire week and freeze or refrigerate them. Don't know how to cook? Learn, you do not have to be Emeril to know how to make wraps, sandwiches or broil some chicken breasts and steam some veggies. Too expensive to eat healthy?That's a myth spread around by the lazy. You do not have to buy expensive protein shakes or organic foods. It is cheaper to buy fresh whole foods at a local Pathmark than it is to buy fast foods and boxed frozen foods. Think about it this way for $10 you can either buy 3 boxes of frozen food which will only serve 3 people 1 meal, or if you're talking fast food it'll buy you 1 value meal and 2 items from the dollar menu which will barely feed 3 people. Now take that $10 into a grocery store and you'll see that you can buy a 2 lb top round london broil, a sack of potatos and 2 bunches of brocolli which depending on how you portion it will feed anywhere from 4 to 6 family members. That's another thing, PORTIONS! How many times do you or someone you know leaves the table groaning, "Ugh, I feel like I'm gonna explode!"? There is no need to eat till it is physically painful and if you cooked your own meals you would be able to control your own portions. Also, pay more attention to what you're children are doing, too many parents rely on the computer, gameboys and television to keep their kids quiet and out of their hair. Encourage fun family activities that are centered around sports. Soccer leagues, bowling leagues, softball leagues, hiking, skiing, biking, a day at the pool etc are all fun and affordable and it also helps families to bond. Which is the better scenario here? A kid that one day looks back at their childhood and remembers all the great family meals and happy times he/she had with their parents or a kid that looks back at his/her childhood and thinks to themselves, "Gee I used to love Grand Theft Auto." and Ronald McDonald being their icon of childhood happiness. Remember parents one day your children just might stick you in a nursing home because they are too busy and want to keep you out of their hair, maybe if they're nice and have the time they'll bring you Biggie fries and a Big Mac.
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  5. #5
    Registered User bigmac2169's Avatar
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    Putdown The Fork!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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  6. #6
    Registered User dajoker24's Avatar
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    stop the lobbyists in washington that work for all of the fast food corporations and clean up what we're feeding our children in our schools!!! (that would be a start)
    "PAIN IS WEAKNESS LEAVING THE BODY!!!"
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  7. #7
    The one and only bigcalves's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by bigmac2169
    Putdown The Fork!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    lol ironic screen name
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  8. #8
    Keto Maven Stonecoldtruth's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by bigcalves
    lol ironic screen name
    I bet my calves are bigger than yours *sticks his tongue out then runs*
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  9. #9
    Registered User cheech806's Avatar
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    WHAT CAN WE DO TO FIGHT OBESITY?
    **Well one good thing to teach an obese person is that being a normal weight is not about the "look", but rather about being fit and healthy. We must teach them that exercise is not just helping them get tone, but it's also helping them prevent a lot of deadly diseases and cancer that could end there life early. Another thing we can do is volunteer to speak to groups of obese people and show them how fun and exciting exercising can be.

    HOW IMPORTANT IS IT FIGHTING OBESITY?
    **It's important to fight obesity because it's one of the top killers in the U.S., and is fueling an epidemic of type 2 diabetes which reduces lifespan. These people are also making the cost of healthcare increase by hundreds of dollars per year. Obesity also makes the image of the U.S. look like everyone that lives here is fat and lazy, because they can't manage their own weight. So I think it is very important that we do all we can to help obese people lose all the excess fat. Also, obese people usually look older than their and are less unnattractive, so fighting it would obviously make you look better and look your age.

    WHAT DO YOU SEE IN THE FUTURE STATISTICS OF OBESITY? HOW DID YOU COME TO THIS CONCLUSION?
    **I see them going up because people just think they can buy a fat burner and lose weight immediately with no exercise at all, and eating all the double cheeseburgers and fries that they want. Most people do not get taught good eating habits so they grow up and eat anything they want, then they want to go and blame genetics when they're obese. I came up with this conclusion because even in this small town of 1800 people, there is people that are morbidly obese and most of the kids are way fatter than what i used to be, and i grew up in the same town.

    BONUS QUESTION: HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT CHILD OBESITY? WHO DO YOU THINK IS AT FAULT TO BLAME?
    **The people that are at fault to blame for child obesity is both the kids and parents. The reason I said both is because the parents don't teach the kid good eating habits, and the kid chooses if he wants to go outside and do some physical activity. I feel like with all these new electronics and games that the kid would rather play a game than go outside and play footballl or soccer etc. The parents should also show the kid not to get seconds and not to eat to much junk food. One thing all parents should do is serve their kid in proportions, but because there is so much fast food places around they always want fast food. If you can't avoid the fast food then only get them the burger without the fries and coke, and substitute the fries and coke with water or milk and some vegetables. Another thing parents can do to prevent obesity to their kids is not buy them so much video games and let them watch tv for no more than 1 hr 30 min a day. The rest of the time the parents should try to get involved in some activities for kids.
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  10. #10
    Registered User Nevel's Avatar
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    TOPIC: What Can We Do To Fight Obesity?

    As bodybuilders we do our best to live a healthy lifestyle. Unfortunately it seems as if our race is dying out. Many people are not living a healthy lifestyle. Most of American adults are overweight or obese.

    What can we do to fight obesity?
    There are many ways that we, as bodybuilders, can contribute to the fight against obesity. First and foremost, we can lead by example. Let others know how good it feels to eat right and exercise. Let our passion show through and share our enthusiasm with others. I know that a lot of people who get motivated to lose weight and live healthier when they see others around them doing so. How many of us started lifting weights, eating less sugar and more protein because we saw “Rocky” or “Predator” and were motivated to look like Stallone or Schwarzenegger? The same thing applies to people today.

    Another thing we can do to help is to be supportive of those who are making an effort. Be honest, we’ve all done it, maybe not now, but when we were younger…. We see someone in the gym that is obese and making an effort to get back into shape. They are tirelessly going from bench to bench, machine to machine, yanking, pulling, pushing, and doing it all wrong. We snicker to ourselves or to our lifting partners, making a negative comment about how they won’t last a week. Most of the time, we are correct with our assumptions. However, imagine how this person would feel if some of the “bigger” guys came over and talked to him or her and encouraged them with their training and maybe gave them some advice or answered any questions that they may be thinking. This little push of encouragement may be all this person needs to go from giving up and remaining obese to being dedicated and coming back again and again until their goals are achieved.

    The final thing that we can do is to help those around us who have not made an effort to be active or eat healthy. Maybe invite someone unmotivated that we know to come along to the gym with us, even if it’s just to spot us while we work out, and then slowly convince them to give it a try. Have your family sit down to a homemade meal instead of ordering out for food and sitting in front of the TV. If you don’t live with your family, invite someone over to your place for lunch or dinner and make them a tasty, healthy meal. You may be surprised to find how many people are pickin’ up what you’re puttin’ down.

    How important is it fighting obesity?
    It is VERY important to fight obesity. If only for the sake of our species! We have evolved our society into a race of people who don’t move and have everything done for us by machines. The national pastime used to be baseball, now its blogging. Meals are rarely made in the home, but rather are delivered in cardboard boxes or Styrofoam containers. These methods of eating were once reserved for those who couldn’t leave the home or make their own meals; it was called meals-on-wheels. Now they make up the staple of the American diet.

    Percentages of the population with diabetes, heart disease, and hypertension have skyrocketed. All of these diseases show a high correlation with obesity. Instead of trying to prevent the cause (obesity), we are more content to get fat, get sick, and get medicine from a doctor. If we were to keep fit and healthy, we would avoid millions in health care costs.

    What do you see in the future statistics of obesity? How did you come to this conclusion?

    Based on what we are seeing now, the outlook for obesity in the future is not good. Although everyone is supposedly health obsessed these days and watching what they are eating, we are still seeing all-time highs in obesity statistics. The most likely reason for this is the fad diet. People want fast, easy fixes for being overweight. We’ve been hearing it for years- “The only secret is- there is no secret”. We’ve been told since the time we were born: to lose weight and avoid obesity, eat less and exercise more. The only problem is that this solution takes weeks and demands discipline and dedication, things that most people are lacking. The fad diet on the other hand offers quick, easy results and all you have to do is take a pill or eat one food in huge amounts. Which sounds easier to you? The only problem is that most of these diets don’t work and end up doing more bad than good. Many people get on these diets and then rebound back to being heavier than they were when they started.

    Our efforts to educate people about nutrition have been successful. Everyone I talk to knows a lot more than the public used to know about fat, carbohydrates, and protein. The problem is that they are not using the knowledge that they have. They take things to extremes since our mindset is “if some is good, more is better”. For example, the Atkins diet had been used by bodybuilders for years to drop fat. They would cut down on carbohydrates and eat lean sources of protein, forcing their bodies to use fat as fuel. As soon as the general public got hold of the Atkins concept, they went insane with it. They would cut out all carbohydrates they had and eat plates full of bacon and lard. It should not have surprised anyone that this backfired and resulted in heart problems.

    New food choices being made available to us also give us a clue about obesity in the future. More and more health foods are coming out every day. Entire aisles in supermarkets are labeled “heath foods” and salads are available in every fast food restaurant. At the same time, food companies are coming out with the same number of unhealthy options. A good example is Burger King. After the release of “Super Size Me”, all fast food corporations added salads to their menus in hope of bringing back those health conscious customers they had lost. At the same time, Burger King developed their line of enormous breakfast sandwiches, which boast around 750 calories. Which do you see advertised more: The container of lettuce? Or the creepy guy in the king costume and mask holding a breakfast lard sandwich?

    So even though we are more knowledgeable than ever about nutrition and health, we still continue to dig ourselves into the hole of obesity. Hopefully people will begin to use their knowledge and eat right to avoid or cure obesity in the future.
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  11. #11
    Registered User Nevel's Avatar
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    TOPIC: How Did You Begin Bodybuilding? (Continued)

    BONUS QUESTION: How do you feel about child obesity? Who do you think is at fault to blame?

    Childhood obesity is a growing problem these days. With 11% of children 6-11 being overweight and 30% at risk, it is a serious epidemic. Childhood obesity leads to early development of chronic diseases such as high blood pressure and atherosclerosis. In fact, obesity is the leading cause of pediatric hypertension (high blood pressure in children). Not only is it physically unhealthy, but it can also be psychologically unhealthy as well. We all remember that one fat kid who was always picked on in school. Kids are becoming more sedentary and less athletic. They are hypnotized by instant messaging, television, and the internet. Schools are in a sort of naďve denial about the whole situation. They say they are going to implement more nutrition education programs in the schools. But this means an extra assembly or a few posters on the wall of the cafeteria. I remember when I was that age, I never paid attention to anything that teachers told me about nutrition. In fact, knowing what I know now, most of the stuff they told us was incorrect anyways. Gym class hours and sports programs are being cut in exchange for more scholastic education time since many schools have to meet certain test score requirements for funding. It is important that kids be smart, but if they aren’t healthy enough to live long enough to use the knowledge, what’s the point?

    Although schools offer to “educate” students about proper nutrition, they allow their lunch program to be filled with unhealthy menus. School lunches are required to meet certain nutrient standards, but only on a weekly basis. That means that they can have a meal on Monday that has 60g of Trans fat and a meal on Friday that has no fat, but as long as it averages out to the nutrient standards set by the government, it is an acceptable menu for that week. Most schools offer a healthy alternative to their students, like a salad. However, what kid is going to choose a salad when all his friends are chowing down on a big bowl of creamy mac and cheese? The healthy options should be changed from options to entrees. This means more vegetables and fruits, leaner meats, and healthier desserts.

    On the matter of who is to blame, some say the parents are to blame, other say food companies and advertising. I say that each case is individual. Being a nutrition major, I have seen many cases where indeed, the parents are to blame for their child’s obesity. They stock the house with unhealthy foods and take their children out for fast food on a regular basis. Fast food companies also have a hand in creating child obesity. Ask any kid what their favorite food is and I bet they will name something that is not homemade. They will probably say pizza or a hamburger; however they are not referring to a 95% lean homemade hamburger or a whole wheat crust vegetable pizza. They are most likely talking about a personal pan from Pizza Hut or a brown cardboard disk between 2 buns that comes in their Happy meal.

    On a personal note, I was overweight, perhaps borderline obese all through school. I didn’t get into weight training or eating healthy until around my senior year of high school. Growing up with tall, lean basketball players for older brothers, I was the oddball of the family. My mother, who has always been health conscious, encouraged me to lose weight, be more active, and eat healthier. She got rid of all junk food in the house and made me ride my bike to the post office every day for the mail. Despite these positive influences from my parents and lack of junk food in the house, I still got fatter and unhealthier up until I graduated high school. I would sneak junk food into the house, go over to friends’ houses and eat junk food they had, or get multiple school lunches each day. So the person that I blame for that situation was myself. It was not advertising, parents, or any other influence.

    I refused to change my eating habits until I was introduced to bodybuilding. That’s when everything clicked in my head and it became clear to me that eating healthy and exercising made me feel good and was something that everyone should do. So maybe we are the answer to the obesity problem with some younger people. They haven’t been properly introduced to a sport they can love. I believe that bodybuilding is the answer for many of these people.

    So I do think that parents and the media can play a role in creating childhood obesity up to a certain age, however when they grow up it is ultimately up to each person to decide how much exercise they get and what to eat.
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  12. #12
    Registered User Machelle's Avatar
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    Post It can change.

    What can we do to fight obesity?

    Personally, as a mommy of two and childcare provider for 14 I am currently doing my part in educating the children in my care on how to make "healthy choices". I serve LOTS of fresh fruits and vegetables and we all "taste test" one new food or recipe each week.The kids actually prefer healthy snacks to candies when given the option. My own son is an apple freak, LOL!

    I make my own healthy choices "out loud" when the opportunity arises to be an example to the kids and show them that this is a way of life not a one time decision to do somthing good for yourself. I emphasize with the kids the importance of "health" and won't let it become a "weight" issue. In that way you are more able to emphasize the importance of strength and attitude along with nutrition.

    On a bigger scale, I think more of the same. The fact that it seems some of the more "public" agencies are focusing on health issues as they relate to the "Average Joe" (e.g: more public service announcments, schools doing their minimal effort to offer healthy school meals as opposed to not trying at all, etc.) demonstrates a shift in the mindset we all have as a whole. In the past it seemed the average person was an inactive participantint their own health, now however, to not be health concious and own a pair of running shoes is starting to become taboo. We are all coming to understand (slowly) the improtance of maintaining our health. First thing I want to know when I reserve a hotel is , "Do they have a gym?" If not, I'll find somwhere else. As this mindset grows, the health of our communities as awhole will also.

    How important is it fighting obesity?

    Well, how important is your life? We have created more ways to ensure our early death than I think at anytime. With 1000 calorie burgers, and butt indents on the end of our couches we have become so fat laden and have set ourselves up with the perfect foundation for major medical issues all revolving around being sedatary and overweight. Just the dollar amout that obesity accounts for in the treatment of related diseases is staggering. Type II diabetes alone is completly preventable in most cases by staying even marginally close to your ideal weight and is a trigger for a whole list of deadly complications. Now, the statistics show that 1 in every 3 children will grow up to have Type II......1 IN EVERY 3!!!! Good Lord, weare raising our kids to live a life of suffering and disease, all because if we don't give them the candy and cookies they will "get upset"! Good job mom and dad. This statistic alone can be reversed asthe bodyfat these children carry is reversed. How dramatic of a corrolation do you need to see the importance of fighting obesity. We haven't even mentioned all the heart attacks, organ failure, strokes, or any of the other typically adult effects obesity has on us.

    What do you see in the future statistics of obesity? How did you come to this conclusion?

    As I mentioned before, I think that a new mindset is starting to grow among people these days. Now you are seeing fast food chains offering "healthy options" and people talk about their prefferred cardio as ordinary conversation. It is becoming increasingly evident as our overweight friends die of heart attacks at age 50, and our nieces are being diagnosed with Type II at age 10 that the importance of a healthy a lifestyle can no longer be ignored. It "is in our face" on a daily basis now with no hope of sweeping it under the rug and ignoring it with another serving of apple pie. Weight is a deciding factor in the quality of your life. This is not myth, this is fact. No one denies that no matter how bad you would like to. This in itself will drive the marginally disiplined to make at least a few changes in lifestyle to bring them a few steps closer to a healthy body. As bad off as we have been, that alone will make dramatic differences in the future statistics we are referring to.

    This mommy alone has resolved recently to change everything and has gone from 43% BF to 29.9% so far. The topic of healthy living is not something we address in our deepest throws of guilt after seeing an all time high on the scale, it is now somthing we talk about as a family everyday. I don't think I am so unlike the "Average Joe" and if this is going on in just a fraction of the households of our communities, this will have staggering results down the road in the furutre health of all of us as a whole.


    How do you feel about child obesity? Who do you think is at fault to blame?

    I will pull no punches on this one.....PARENTS! I am as guilty as the next guy. Your 3 year old won't sit still for his hair cut, what do you do?.....give him a sucker to distract him so he won't wiggle so much. Then there is the extreme of sticking anything sweet in their mouth just shut them up long enough not to hear the screaming for 2 minutes while trying to gather up that last nerve that just fell to the floor. Say what you want, but the fact remains we use sweets and candy as more of a child rearing tool. It is pathetic really. Then we are shocked when we have an 85 pound second grader! Bottom line, suck it up, invest the time it REQUIRES to raise a child and quite shoving food in their face as rewards. How many adults speak of emotional eating on all the diet forums, care to guess why that is? We have made food the ultimate soother in an emotionally challenging moment.

    With my own children and my childcare darlins, they know without a doubt.....A tantrum does not get you what you want, it only ensures that you will never lay a finger on that (Toy, snack, whatever). They even mimic me to each other by saying, "If this item makes you behave like that, I can not allow you to have it." LOL! There is not distraction with candy here as I see in similar situations all the time. For example, the siblings are arguing over a toy, the loudest one gets it the other gets a little sweet treat to make them forget about it. I am sorry, but it just seems to me that this type of constantly reactive parenting has to be emotionally draining for the parent as well as the child, but that's a whole other topic.

    The bottom line is, between the distractive treats (which for the very young can amout to HUGE quantities of sugar in such little bodies), fast food (cause the little darlins love their happy meals), lack of activity (did you know a kid will sit in front of a PS2 for 8 hours straight if you let them?), and lifestyles for many not very indulgent of a child who needs quality (read "not performing caregiving duties") time well spent with one or preferably both parents everyday, we have gotten extremly good at raising overweight/tempermental/TypeII diabetics. Then we send them off to fend for themselves as they then spend the rest of their lives fighting disease and the battle of the bulge without the slightest training in what it means to live a healthy active lifestyle.

    Pat yourself on the back though, you got them a great college education so they can afford the therapy and medical bills. (at least until they must go on disability)

    Machelle
    (Next time tell us what you really think.)
    Last edited by Machelle; 04-09-2006 at 08:45 AM.
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    4 black eyes? egyptoman's Avatar
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    All those tv ads for high everything foods need to be outlawed
    And children need to learn discipline
    I should know im only 15 years old i was a lucky one, growing up in a second world country (EGYPT) but my peers here in the states arent so fortunate, they practically have food flying off the shelves into their bodies,
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    Avi changed. JC-orginalbdass's Avatar
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    Mine.
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    WE cannot do anything. It is up to THEM.

    I believe fast food and unhealthy junk is a good thing. It separates those who have the common sense to know that they are shortening their lives and projecting an unhealthy image, from those who make the effort to eat healthy food although it may not satisfy like a Big Mac, for example.
    A fat, unhealthy society is a perfect metaphor for the self-indulgence that takes place in many forms everyday. Mmmm...food tastes good, brings pleasure while gorging on it. eat. That the people have a choice between packing healthy lunch that takes minutes to prepare (say a tuna and whole wheat sandwich, some cottage cheese and almonds) and a Wendy's #5 double-cheeseburger combo, is great. Sure, the latter may give an instant sort of "ohhhhh mannnnn, this is gooddddddddd..." satisfaction for the first 7/8 of the burger and 1/2 box of fries, not too mention the bubbly syrup of a drink...but you see, that's whats great about it. Those of us who can practice a little self control have the chance, with proper training, to have our physical appearance show that we do in fact practice (or is it practise) self-control, at least with regards to what we eat. Obesity is the same thing as an STD. If you have no control, and don't take the proper precautions (using protection, eating healthy), you end up obese or well...use your imagination.
    I don't know what I'm saying. But it beats writing finals. I need a nap.
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    Registered User Joe55's Avatar
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    The "Diseasing" of America

    Obesity is a choice. Every time you decide to eat you are making a choice.

    I am so tired of the 12 Step approach to everything-- including obesity: I can't help it; I have a disease!

    By accepting this philosophy we encourage helplessness.

    Anyone who insists they are helpless because of a "disease" ought to take a look at the transformations on this site at men and women who simply made up their minds to get healthy.

    At the same time, I agree that the fast-food industry is brainwashing out children. When I went to school there were no candy and soda machines. In fact, if were were even chewing gum in class, we were disciplined. We were served a balanced lunch in the cafeteria.

    But, once kids grow up, they can exercise choice.
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    Registered User JBL1's Avatar
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    Obesity

    What can we do to fight obesity?

    Despite the common opinion among those that are not obese, obesity is a disease, similiar to alcoholism or any other addiction. The American Obesity Association has successfully lobied for it to be labeled as such. To combat obesity would require a multifaceted approach towards the problem as obesity is a result of not only biological problems but sociological as well. To fight obesity, it would be necessary to fight discrimination amongst the overweight in our society as well. A child genetically could be overweight but do to constant teasing finds solace in their disability and eats until they are obese. There is a fine line where the genetic effects of overweight end and where the psycho-social trends begin to effect a person that eventually becomes obese. Tolerance and education of obesity is necessary. The current education system, especially the physical education system, does a poor job at best of educating the youth of this country in what is truely healthy. Rather, they preach tired old ideals like the "food guide pyramid" and "ideal body weights" that fail to take lifestyle or body type factors into consideration. Losing weight and bodybuilding are personal variables. There is no unified right or wrong answer when it comes to what works for an individual's body type. If it were that easy, nobody would be obese. However, just as the education system preaches (but fail to practice as it relates to overweight children), everybody is different and needs this needs to be taken into consideration when developing a lifestyle change for young children and adolescents. Also when subjects such as alcohol and drugs are discussed in school, the fact that that alcohol is a source of empty calories should be discussed as well. Too few students realize that binge drinking equals beer bellies. Early in physical education, the value of walking and basic weight training for health needs to be presented. Currently, unfortunately, these basic lifestyle necessities are somehow left out of the cirriculum and instead games with little actual physical activity are standard. It is also necessary for schools to start improving the nutritional quality of their lunches and offer nutritional guides so that students know what they are putting into their body. This should be taught at the earliest ages of education. If children can already be doing math in kindergarten, due to the No Child Left Behind Act, then they are also ready to start learning the basics of what they are putting into their body. The more the schools help, the less dependent a child's health will be on parent's that might not have any clue when it comes to nutrition and the child shouldn't have to suffer for the parent's lack of knowledge.

    How important is it fighting obesity?

    Fighting obesity is essential. With modern advances in life extension, it is necessary for humanity to begin working on ways to life longer and healthier lives, not just longer lives. Recognizing that many individuals would be in different stages in their own person battle against obesity, an education campaign would need to be developed that would encompass everybody from five pounds to five hundred pounds over weight and beginning as early as age five. It is also essential to ever obese child that we begin to educate against obesity as soon as possible. Insurance coverage needs to start covering liposuctions in cases where the individual is morbidly obese. Sometimes it is necessary for people to be given a second chance. It is foolish to expect somebody who for forty years has been two hundred pounds overweight to erase this in a matter of months and yet it is essential to their health and wellbeing. If obesity is controlled, health care costs will also go down as obesity related illnesses such as chronic pain and depression will no longer be quite as prevelent in society. Likewise, lack of obesity will help those who have serious illnesses or operations recover much quicker.

    What do you see in the future statistics of obesity? How did you come to this conclusion?

    Statistics have the potential to improve. The knowledge when it comes to nutrition and exercise science has improved one hundred fold in the last twenty years. What needs to happen is to have this knowledge trickle down through the education system as well as out into the work place. Health Savings Accounts and incentive pay for good health are an excellent start, as they provide an external motivation for keeping good health. The more companies and schools that provide such a means of motivation, the better.

    BONUS QUESTION: How do you feel about child obesity? Who do you think is at fault to blame?

    Improving the child hood obesity rate is the first and most essential step in the fight against obesity. Child obesity can be traced to many facets. Lack of nutritional knowledge and application by the parents is the first that I see. If good eating habits are not taught early, they get harder to internalize if and when they are taught later in life. The second major cause is genetics. Some people have excellent metabolisms and some do not. This fact brings us to the next cause which is lack of education. Children need to be taught that they can not necessarily eat like their friends and peers and look like them. You could feed two children the same diet and one would get fat and the other would stay skinny. This evidence leads to the next cause which is discrimination. Rather than recognize the above, children assume that overweight children are just fat and lazy when this is not necessarily the case. These ideas and comments that develop from these ideas are hurtful and can inflict damage to the child's self concept that might still be evident once that child becomes an adult. Tolerance is the first step towards curing obesity. If it is recognized universally as a disease that affects somebody all of us know and love, then maybe those that suffer will finally get the assistance that they need....and the sooner in life, the better.
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    Registered User Joe55's Avatar
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    A Behavior is not a disease

    Originally Posted by JBL1
    Despite the common opinion among those that are not obese, obesity is a disease, similiar to alcoholism or any other addiction.
    Overeating, overdrinking, drug use are not "diseases" they are behaviors, which, except in very rare instances, can be controlled. (See the Stanton Peele website on this issue: http://www.peele.net/ )

    The American Obesity Association might want to rethink having overeating classed with alcoholism or drug abuse. For example: If I showed up on my job drunk and or stoned, it wouldn't be tolerated. If overeating is viewed the same way, someone who shows up chronically obese, is obviously "using" and this wouldn't be tolerated either.
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  19. #19
    BodyBuilder in the Making DWalk's Avatar
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    Ensure daily, quality physical education for all school grades. Currently, only one state in the country -- Illinois -- requires physical education for grades K-12, while only about one in four teenagers nationwide take part in some form of physical education.
    • Ensure that more food options that are low in fat and calories, as well as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat or non-fat dairy products, are available on school campuses and at school events. A modest step toward achieving this would be to enforce existing U.S. Department of Agriculture regulations that prohibit serving foods of minimal nutritional value during mealtimes in school food service areas, including in vending machines.
    • Make community facilities available for physical activity for all people, including on the weekends.
    • Create more opportunities for physical activity at work sites.
    • Reduce time spent watching television and in other sedentary behaviors. In 1999, 43 percent of high-school students reported watching two hours of TV or more a day.
    • Educate all expectant parents about the benefits of breast-feeding. Studies indicate breast-fed infants may be less likely to become overweight as they grow older.
    bullet Change the perception of obesity so that health becomes the chief concern, not personal appearance.
    • Increase research on the behavioral and biological causes of overweight and obesity. Direct research toward prevention and treatment, and toward ethnic/racial health disparities.
    • Educate health care providers and health profession students on the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity across the lifespan.
    A man can be as great as he wants to be. If you believe in yourself and have the courage, the determination, the dedication, the competitive drive and if you are willing to sacrifice the little things in life and pay the price for the things that are worthwhile, it can be done.
    -Vince Lombardi
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    Registered User JBL1's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Joe55
    Overeating, overdrinking, drug use are not "diseases" they are behaviors, which, except in very rare instances, can be controlled. (See the Stanton Peele website on this issue: http://www.peele.net/ )

    The American Obesity Association might want to rethink having overeating classed with alcoholism or drug abuse. For example: If I showed up on my job drunk and or stoned, it wouldn't be tolerated. If overeating is viewed the same way, someone who shows up chronically obese, is obviously "using" and this wouldn't be tolerated either.
    I am not going to argue with you on the issue of what the American Obesity Association thinks. You are welcome to take that opinion up with them if you so choose. If you take issue with what I say, that is up to you but it is my opinion and the opinion of one psychologist is not going to change my way of thinking. Obesity is a complex issue, it is not always just a matter of overeating. It would be easy for me, as somebody who overcame obesity, to say that all people have to do is eat better and get over the problem, and at a time I did feel that way. However, just as somebody might be predisposed to be tall, somebody might have a large body type and it is then difficult for them to be skinny. There are other parts of life besides just exercising, such as family, school and job constraints that might take the majority of somebody's time. Additionally, not everybody in the country can afford to join a gym or afford to eat healthy. The fact that you can afford a gym membership, can afford to eat well and can afford a computer seperates you from many of the obese in our society. You need to recognize that they are coming from a completely different standpoint than you and not judge them for that reason. Going to work obese is not the same as going to work drunk. You can't just not eat for a couple hours and be unobese as you would be sober. You can not belive what I say all you want but you should respect the fact that I may voice my opinon on an open forum just as you are allowed to voice your own.
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    Registered User kenatdvc's Avatar
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    the fight

    What can we do to fight obesity?

    The fight against obesity is, at least in the near future, one that is without a proper victor (us). To support this I go to the underlying causes that propagate obesity, that of complacency and a distinct lack of drive.
    Americans are complacent. How often must we here those scathing words “its good enough” or “its fine”? It is these overused phrases that have allowed for the fattening of America. When someone states that something is fine, the are simultaneously asserting that there is something better, however the effort to attain these results out weighs their need to feel *temporary* comfort. This directly applies to the choices we make with regard to fitness. It is entirely likely that the same person that feels that something less than perfect outside themselves’ is acceptable, fells that less than perfection for his self is equally acceptable. This is particularly disturbing for it acknowledges the existence of the problem, yet no desire to fix it. This is where our focus must converge, in the motivation of Americans.
    In a recent trip to the local mall I saw what can only be described as an enemy to this cause; a Dove soap ad featuring heavyset models. Why is this so worrisome? Simply speaking, models are (supposed to be) the ideals of society, what every one strives to attain, the epitome of perfection. The goal of the nation. When the image of perfection shifts to those that do not represent our notion of perfection (athleticism, thin, beautiful) rather something less, then those that cater to the phrase “its fine” have an even lower point of achievement. This then creates a cycle that, years down the line, results in our dwindling numbers to be that of a fond memory. I am by no means suggesting that a fascist approach to fitness is what this nation needs (it would be interesting though), but at lest a desire to more than the bare minimum.
    Some argue against excess, some against hate, I on the other hand am arguing for the return of competition. True, some cannot handle competition, they buckle for whatever reason (this can be avoided with proper care at important times in child development), but it was these that represented, in years past, the obese. Now, with the disappearance of competition, there is no place for children to see the benefit of a healthy lifestyle. The jocks no longer rule the playground. It is now over bearing parents that seek to maintain an artificial comfort level for their children, that leads to that same comfort level being sought later in life. Comfort that food provides. Competition severs this relationship. Success is not met to those engaged in a competition by remaining comfortable. One must push that boundary, and it is this push that translates to everyday decisions. This push that prevents “good enough’ from ever being an option.

    How important is it fighting obesity?

    As stipulated above, the fight against obesity is vitally important, not only for the obvious reasons of resources and individual health, but for the US to remain on top economically. Of one were to look at the fastest growing economies (Asia), what can be comfortably said about the people of these nations? I contend that it is that they are highly competitive, indeed competitive in everything. As a college student I see those that sit at the head of the grade curve are those that are competitive, those that push themselves, those with discipline. They are therefore, those that are also in general, thinner. True, very few in the engineering department are athletes, but very few are obese. Thus, those that are competitive are thin, and competitive nations do well economically. So for America to be thin transcends the desire for people to be comfortably stagnant. (Stagnancy is, after all, allowing the world to pass you by. What is to stop China from doing the same?)

    What do you see in the future statistics of obesity?How did you come to this conclusion?

    As per above, I have linked obesity with comfort, and as the American economy shrinks in the next 20 years (lack of industrial base) people will more and more desire comfort. This, by the current trend, will be food. So unless Americans suddenly switch to long term solutions, instead of instant gratification, I only see the obese population increasing.

    BONUS QUESTION: How do you feel about child obesity? Who do you think is at fault to blame?

    I am disgusted at the idea of child obesity. Although some may call me a hypocrite for this, (I was 86 pounds in 2nd grade, but I was also the tallest) I still find it deeply disturbing. Drawing on my own experience, as young child I was never pushed, and as a result I was all too happy to eat a 7 oz box of macaroni and cheese for lunch. Since I was allowed to be complacent at school and in sports, it was therefore entire logical that I was equally happy being complacent at home. If it wasn’t for my exposure to those great 80’s icons of He Man, Schwarzenegger, and Stallone, I doubt I ever would have found the motivation to alter my ways. The current generation lacks such mythical figures; instead they have those Dove ads in the mall, or Good Housekeeping with pictures of brownies on it at the checkout, and a big fat dinosaur to look up to. They have jealous parents belittling physical achievement of others, describing so called impossible body images to their children, and to the question “am I fat?” They respond, not with a productive ‘you can be however you want to be’ (allowing for improvement) but a goal crushing ‘you are FINE just the way you are’. And the cycle continues.
    Last edited by kenatdvc; 04-11-2006 at 02:52 PM.
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    Registered User dancerninja's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by JBL1
    However, just as somebody might be predisposed to be tall, somebody might have a large body type and it is then difficult for them to be skinny. There are other parts of life besides just exercising, such as family, school and job constraints that might take the majority of somebody's time. Additionally, not everybody in the country can afford to join a gym or afford to eat healthy.
    I usually don't counteract what others say, however:

    You mention that some people don't have time to eat right and be healthy. As a graduate student, working for a PhD, I know what a busy life is like, and a person must MAKE room for it.

    Also, as far as money, you don't need a gym membership to walk around, do push ups, or crunches. Park further from work or the store and walk. Take the stairs. And I've found that when I eat healthy at home, its cheaper than getting fast food and cookies.

    And where genetics is concerned, yes, some people have slower metabolisms than others. Some have larger frames. This isn't about being skinny, though, it's about being healthy. You make compensations for your caloric needs, and set reasonable goals for your frame.
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    answer: more education

    I think most people are still going by 70's-80's thinking. People do weight training to get bigger and cardio to get smaller. First off, you need muscle mass to burn calories, second someone 5'10 210 muscle looks great, someone 5'10 210 fat looks bad. Also most of the negative effects of being over weight are really due to higher fat percentage, not necessarily total body weight. So I think the word really needs to get out that you need a balanced workout routine including both cardio and weight training.

    I've heard people say, you'll never see an overweight jogger, I say you'll never see someone that just jogs that looks good. They usually will look thin but flabby, especially in the upper body.

    Fighting obesity is very important, it has huge social and economic effects. Increased medical expenses, increased food consumption, decreased work efficentcy etc. We as a society need to realize that our free decisions to smoke, over drink, over eat etc. effect our competativeness when it comes to production at work, and efficentcy of resource distribution.

    Sadly, I think for the next few decades we are headed for increased obesity. The combination of 2+ income families, with the resulting lack of desire to cook healthy meals at home, the decrease in food costs, and the marketing appeal of fast food and junk food will drive our population to new levels of obesity.

    After a few decades though I think we will come to our senses. I think it will be forced by the western world losing the position of number one economy. Societies such as China and India with massive economies and societies not as geared to quick fixes for hunger and everything else, will out produce us in manufacturing, and provide cheaper intelectual labor as well. Our relatively universal health care(especially in Canada, and majority of europe), will eat up a lot of the GDP and we simply will not be able to compete. We will be forced to change our habits, or become the third world, with high mortality rates, and wide spread unemployment.

    For child obesity, I think parents need to except responsibity. If your kid only wants to play video games, and you continue to buy him the latest console so he won't sulk, you are to blame. You should take away the consoles, and give them a ball and send them to a park. When they are back in shape and used to activity, then they can entertain themselves on the side with sadiated activities. Essentially they, like the rest of us, need to learn that you need to put in your work before you get to play, you can't just charge it, by doing as you want and leaving the consequences until later.
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    What can we do to fight obesity?

    A major theme of my response to the overall issue of obesity will be education. Therefore, responding to this first general question regarding obesity I strongly encourage nutritional education through school, work, friends, family, basically any positive setting where people will be apt to listen rather than tune out. From my personal experience being obese does not worry people, and in todays society being obese has even been elevated to humor status (certainly in men more than women but nonetheless this is startling). Therefore, it is crucial that information regarding obesity, such as the greatly heightened risks of increased blood pressure, increased cholesterol levels, diabetes, heart disease, cancer, and other serious health problems, be continously proliferated to people. As I spoke to before, the more variety in which people get this message (friends, family, coworker, mass media) without feeling attacked will have a greater impact.

    Continuing with the theme of education I also feel it is important to inform people of exactly what they are putting in their bodies (even though that may mean some form of government intervention, a hotly debated topic I understand). To that end, prominently displaying caloric information as well as regulating the extent to which advertising and product information is deceptive ('reduced fat' for example is NOT enough information for a person to intelligently choose a food item), is imperative. If comparisons of overall healthiness of foods is made easy for the consumer it is more likely in my estimation that a person will make relatively healthier purchasing decisions.

    Lastly, obesity needs to be recognized as a problem not just for the obese but for everybody (skyrocketing health costs clearly aren't good for the average person). As such, employers should be urged to provide not only time but also opportunity for exercise. By doing this, an employer will actually be acting self interestedly by curbing health costs incurred by employees. Such a proposition, already being implemented in some cases, entails either providing on site workout equipment or subsidizing (hopefully completely) a gym membership for all employees. Subsequently, every quarter/year or what have you an optional physical exam would be given to employees with positive results (healthy amounts of weight loss, body-fat percentage decreases, lowered blood pressure, lowered cholestoral, etc.) would be rewarded with quarter end/year end bonuses. Money coupled with positive education will be enough to motivate a significant amount of people to get healthier.


    How important is it fighting obesity?

    As I have eluded to fighting obesity is crucial. The short and long term health concerns related to being obese are numerous and very serious. Moreover, for the more self interested people out there obesity costs people money. Moreover, aside from the obvious physical ramifications of fighting obesity, emotional distress is of concern. By fighting obesity we are fighting for the general well being of our society, this cannot be understated!

    What do you see in the future statistics of obesity? How did you come to this conclusion?

    With developed society having easy access to food and little need by way of survival for physical exertion, it seems evident that even the most aggressive campaigns against obesity will not curb its rise. Moreover, with dramatically increasing healthcare costs there is pressure to reduce costs, and therefore benefits, of healthcare that otherwise may be part of the long term answer to obesity. Furthermore, private enterprises rarely take such proactive measures as I have described above, although I will continue to strongly advocate my position, for fear of the short term hit to the bottom line. Therefore, barring a medical breakthrough, and at the risk of sounding overly bleak, the future of obesity statistics is poised to see continued increases in obesity levels, related health ailments, and related costs. Conclusively, I came to this reality based on the current situation facing people in regards to necessity of physical exertion, ease and cost of acquiring processed foods, the economic reality particular in America, and possibly most powerfully of all plain old personal experience.

    BONUS QUESTION: How do you feel about child obesity? Who do you think is at fault to blame?

    Child obesity is clearly a rather alarming phenomenon, not only because of the negative effects a child will face during childhood (physical AND emotional) but also because of the huge potential for lifelong problems. It seems evident to me that the proliferation of liesure time activities that require no physical exertion, namely video games, has and is having a profound affect on the physical well being of children. Moreover, a lack of proper nutritional education for both parents and children undoubtadely plays a significant role in child obesity. However, instead of focusing herein on assigning blame for a rising problem, I will offer up some proactive solutions.

    The primary staple to combating obesity at any age is regular and at least moderately fueled physical activity. Luckily, children are both influencible and much more intelligent than I think some give them credit for. As such, on the physical side I think it is incredibly important for parents/teachers/guardians etc. to find a way to get a child excited about his or her health. To me, that means getting involved and being proactive as a role model rather than taking a "do as I say, not as I do", preaching type of approach to fitness. If your kid likes video games (as most do) and you have the resources, invest in something like dance dance revolution. That way, in addition to getting a child excited about typical avenues of physical activity (namely athletics), a parent doesn't create an atmosphere where a kid wants nothing more than to skip out on baseball/softball, basketball etc. to play the latest shoot-em up. Once a child feels the lasting reward of well being achieved through physical activity AND quality, productive time with parents, certainly that child is much more apt to continue a healthy lifestyle.

    On the nutritional side of the fight against childhood obesity, I again turn to utilizing the intelligence of young people. By promoting and providing a reasonable and well balanced diet, inclusive of a wide variety foods, children will learn good eating habits earlier in life. However, if as a parent your child sees you do nothing but sit on the couch and watch TV while eating take out pizza and potato chips every night, emulation of that lifestyle is as easy as it is destructive. So, nutritionaly speaking education is my largest key to fighting childhood obesity. If your kid wants some ice cream or cookies every now and then, thats fine, there might be something a little wrong if that werent the case. But taking the time to explain that such foods should be a treat and not a staple of a diet, and by suggesting (and eating yourself) an apple or something similar, a parent can create an atmosphere where a child does not feel imprisoned by a diet but instead learns the value of proper nutrition.

    Lastly, and I think this is very important, is monitoring a childs emotional well being. Just like in adults, overeating and being sedentary often have deeper emotional roots. As such, in my opinion it is vital to take the time to prepare a healthy meal for a child and then sit down at the table and talk. Turn off the television, get everybody together, and make sure your children are able to deal with the very real stressors that they face.

    Promoting a positive tone physically, nutritionally, and emotionally for a child is certainly not an easy task. However, doing so will not only give a child the foundation for a healthy lifestyle in the future but also will increase the well being and health of the adults that surround children on a daily basis.
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    Registered User Greystreet's Avatar
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    Answers to Topic of the Week

    What can we do to fight obesity?

    Obesity IS being fought everyday. From personal trainers who prescribe healthier diets and educate trainee's on proper nutrition, to the rise of newly developed health concious stores (ex. Whole Foods), to even Dr. Phil! With that in mind, I think a rephrased question should be presented. "What can we do BETTER, to fight obesity?"

    First, the fight begins with education, and needs to start at a young age. (eluding to the "bonus question" below". The knowledge is out there about the effects and detriments of unhealthy eating habits, so in my mind, we have to make this knowledge more accessible. This can happen thru mandatory classes in education, increased marketing, and sites, like bodybuilding.com. In addition, you have to get it in front of people, who may not have the desire or ambition to look for it themselves. I'm a firm believer that you can only help someone as much as they're willing to help themselves. But the first steps is ours to take in terms of motivation and education.

    Second, the cost of healthy and natural foods could be reduced. Have you ever been inside a Whole Foods Market? The food seletion is great, offering organice produce, and alternatives in other departments such as buffalo (leaner than traditional beef), or organically grown beef. But what comes with this? A hefty price tag. And the fact is, money is tight for a lot of people. Think about marketing for McDonalds, or other fast food chains. One of the main pitches they have is their 99 cent value menu. This perceived dollar savings for cheap, good tasting food is very appealing, not to mention convenience. Which leads me to my 3rd and final point....

    Motivation. this was touched on in the previous two paragraphs. People ulitmately have to make the choice to help themselves. So what motivates those that do? In articles i've read on this site, the birth of newborn has prompted parents to set a good example for their kids by eating and living actively. Others are motivated thru inner strenght, or thru television shows such as the "biggest loser". Finding out what will motivate a person and providing that stimulus, i think is the best way to get things moving.

    In summary, we--those who want to fight obesity--must focus on what we can do around us. Set an example, offer to go for a walk with someone, get those people in your life who may not be as active as you, to participate in activities you know are healthy. Share your experiences, knowledge, and most importantly ENERGY, with those around you. And encourage and nuture the change that you'll begin to see. it will make you a better person, and improve the lives of those you're helping.



    How important is it fighting obesity?

    Obesity has been given a lot of attention, all deserved in my mind. It contributes to the rising cost of health care, though not the sole component of it. It reduces the quality of life for many people affected by it. And while i hesitate to say it is the TOP issue to be faced, i certainly believe it should receive due dilegence in battling. One key thing to note, is that it can be fought daily, by individuals. It doesn't take politicians, or law reform--not that those may come in handy for some cases--but by the points raised above, a difference can be made.

    What do you see in the future statistics of obesity? How did you come to this conclusion?

    Before this can be answered, we have to define what "future" is. Lets say 10 years. I am going to venture out on the positive limb, and say that the future statistics of obesity are going to decline, if only by a nominal amount. Fact is, people ARE becoming aware of this epidemic. People ARE becoming more self concious about how they eat, and exercise, and the examples they want to set for their families and friends. More people join gyms now and seek out personal trainers, diet pills, exercise plans and healthy eating documents, than ever before. they may not stick with it as long as some of would liek to see, but the trends and mentalities are shifting and i believe the steps we're making are in the right direction.

    BONUS QUESTION: How do you feel about child obesity? Who do you think is at fault to blame?

    Child Obseity, falls first and formost on parents. Parents have control over what they're children eat, and they ultimate set the example. Many parents make the excuse they dont have time. Let me note that i was raised by a single mom, and she is someone who thru the years could have EASILY justified "not having time". But somehow, i still was raised with good eating habits. McDonalds or fast food was a treat, often limited to once a week if THAT. She'd cook on the weekend or middle of the week, often making enough for leftovers (which as a kid i sometimes hated, but was still eating a healthy meal) Sure i didn't like it sometimes, did that budge her judgement? Hell no. I was eating it or going hungry. And this is where i think many parents toda falter...they cave. They need to make time to instill good eating habits, and set the example themselves. They need to turn of the tv for the kids (and nowadays, the computer) and push em outside to play. Get them engaged in sports or some activity other than just sitting in front of the tv. Not all kids were born athletes, but i know every kid was not meant to become lifeless. Stimulate their bodies and mind, and they'll grow up healthy. Its really that simple. Not necessarily easy, but simple.
    Last edited by Greystreet; 04-12-2006 at 06:44 AM.
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    Registered User jwong84's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by dajoker24
    stop the lobbyists in washington that work for all of the fast food corporations and clean up what we're feeding our children in our schools!!! (that would be a start)
    The province of Nova Scotia is implimenting a new food policy for Public Schools which I think has a lot of merit. Here's the link:

    http://www.ednet.ns.ca/healthy_eatin...tion_draft.pdf

    The basic point of it is to control all food and drinks being sold in the schools (this includes fundraising activities and school meetings). Basically they're trying to eliminate anything that is nutrient poor. Pretty interesting policy.
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    My Response.
    Worked hard and did some old fasioned research for this one! Enjoy and good luck to everyone!
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    Angry What can we do to fight obesity?

    What can we do to fight obesity?

    Like many have stated, setting an example for others in our own lives is probably the best thing we can do. But there are many other ways, without necessarilly becoming full time activists, that we can combat obesity. Everything from educating ourselves, and sharing that information with others, to writing letters to our representitives, resturant owners, food companies, and airlines, could all go a long way towards reducing the problem, if enough people get actively involved.

    Many obese people, despite repeated warnings from their doctors, simply don't feel the need to go the extra mile and take personal responsibility for their own health. Why should they when their insurance is there to keep them alive with by-pass surgeries, stomach stapeling, and cheap medications?

    This is going to sound a little off point for a minute, but bear with me. I was a member of a group called ABATE. It stands for American Bikers Active Toward Education. They weren't opposed to wearing helmets, just to the federal government blackmailing states into passing mandatory helmet and seatbelt laws or withholding federal funds for roads and bridges. Anyway, I was wearing my shirt one day, and someone asked me about it and I told them what it meant, and they said that they thought that no one should ever be allowed to ride a motorcycle without a helmet. I asked why it should be of any concern to them and they explained that if I were injured severly while riding without a helmet, while in extensive trauma care, I would cause everyone's insurance rates to go up. I thought about this for a moment and realized that because of the way our system is set up, this was, unfortunately true.

    However, using that same line of logic, if you extrapolate the data, of the number of motorcycle accidents, and their related medical costs, versus the number of obese people and their related medical costs, it is approximately 100,000 times more my business if an obese person orders a burger, fries and coke at a fast food resturant, than it is their business whether or not I'm wearing a helmet when I ride my motorcycle.

    Unfortunately, the only thing which motivates the behavior of most folks is money. Unless and until we change some laws and policies to either financially reward good behavior, or punish bad behavior, the issue is certain to continue to worsen, despite recent warnings, and floods of news stories on the issue.

    Convincing airlines to adopt policies of selling tickets by the pound of the passanger, might be one way to help get the ball rolling. Instituting drug testing in bodybuilding, especially womens bodybuilding, might also go a long way towards getting some positive changes in the attitude of the general public, so that they might think of us as the epitome of asthetic achievement of the human form, rather than the, pardon the term, "freakshow", which many think of, when the word bodybuilder is used.

    How important is fighting obesity?

    I don't want to sound Chicken Little-ish here, but this could be the biggest problem of our time. The recent yearly, double-digit health care cost increases, due to the #2 killer in our country, (soon to be #1 according to some estimates), are going to seem like a walk in the park when the obese children (who are already developing type-2 diabetes and many other health problems), get a little older and whallop our health care system like no other crisis in recorded history.

    What do you see in the future statistics of obesity?

    If the frightening childhood rates which are skyrocketing are any indication, unless we get serious, like WWII serious, about this issue, it could very well cripple our citizens and our economy within a decade.

    How did I come to this conclusion?

    Because I've been paying attention. I've read every news article in the newspapers and magizines, on the web and on t.v. that I've seen, and they all indicate that this is a massive problem which people aren't taking as seriously as they should, and could overwhelm our system if we don't attack it soon.

    People laughed when the overweight man tried (unsuccessfully) to sue McDonald's for making him fat. Hardly anyone noticed when congress (almost immediately) passed a law stating that you can't sue fast food companies for making you fat. Boy, they dodged a potential multi-BILLION dollar loss with that one. I wonder how much lobbing money was spent on that bill?

    Supersize Me should be required viewing for every bodybuilder, and every school, which we are paying to help make our children fat with our tax dollars. Whether I have a child in school or not, when they confiscate my money under the threat of seizing my property, I have the right to not have that money contribute to the downfall of this society, by their poor choices contributing to this problem. Schools have abandoned mandatory P.E. (in my hometown, I've recently discovered, in favor of mandatory Spanish classes), and stocked the vending machines with addictive sugar water.

    Recently, our state legislature, (one of the worst states in the Union for childhood and adult obesity rates by the way), took a tiny (in my estimation) step in the right direction by voting to eliminate "junk" foods from the school vending machines, and another measure is in the pipeline to reinstate mandatory P. E. in all K-8 schools. Again, a good first step, but not enough.

    How do I feel about childhood obesity?

    As if you couldn't tell by now . . .

    But I will go a step further. My home state recently made it a felony for folks caught making meth with children in the home. Probably a good law which very few would argue with, except the meth users.

    However, to me, it is just as bad, and I would argue, WORSE to not only allow, but encourage, and by example lead, a child into a lifetime of poor health, disease, ridicule by peers, lessened oportunities of employment, a mate, the possibility of any athletic pursuits, and all the other negative consequences that obesity promises. I'm not sure that I would want to make it a felony, but surely if these people have so little respect for themselves, their health, and the health of their children, they have already demonstrated their unfitness for parenthood.

    Bad habits which are ingrained during childhood may take a lifetime to undo.
    Many of these families are giving their children a life sentence for poor health, depression and misery.

    Who do I think is at fault or to blame?

    Parents first and foremost. But, schools come in a close second, and the companies which are getting rich off of the laziness and stupidity of the masses are running neck and neck with the schools.

    Kraft recently decided (voluntarily) to pull it's advertising aimed directly at the youngest children for it's products which are of the lowest nutritional value. The other food manufactors got extremely upset at Kraft, because they are afraid that it could be seen as an admission of guilt. Think about it, if advertising didn't affect people's behaviour, would these companies be spending Billions of dollars on it every year? Of course not.

    The difference between the food manufactors and the tobacco companies is that the tobacco companies had scientific proof that their product was addictive and could kill people, but lied about it to congress. We know that fast food is addictive and can kill you eventually, but they haven't had to testify about it to congress, yet.
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    have fun
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    4 words should sum it up

    PUT DOWN THE REMOTE
    "A champion is a champion everyday."
    "The man, the myth, the legend.
    "The best there is, the best there was, the best there ever will be."
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