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  1. #1
    Registered User Elliot0409's Avatar
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    How do they figure out how many calories are in something?

    How do they figure out how many calories are in something?
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    Registered User fittchica's Avatar
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    I think they do like this:
    1gram of carbohydrates=4 calories
    1gram of Protein=4 cals
    1 gram of fat=9
    It is done by weight. So by calculating the grams and type of food(p/f or carbs) it can be figured out...
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  3. #3
    Registered User Elliot0409's Avatar
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    Ok..then my question is:

    how do they figure out carbs, fat, protein etc..etc..???
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  4. #4
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    Originally Posted by Elliot0409 View Post
    How do they figure out how many calories are in something?
    Good lord... is this thread #1,000? All of this spoon feeding is making me lose faith in mankind ...

    http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~lrd/CFR101-9.HTML
    (1) ``Calories, total,'' ``Total calories,'' or ``Calories'': A
    statement of the caloric content per serving, expressed to the nearest
    5-calorie increment up to and including 50 calories, and 10-calorie
    increment above 50 calories, except that amounts less than 5 calories
    may be expressed as zero. Energy content per serving may also be
    expressed in kilojoule units, added in parentheses immediately following
    the statement of the caloric content.
    (i) Caloric content may be calculated by the following methods.
    Where either specific or general food factors are used, the factors
    shall be applied to the actual amount (i.e., before rounding) of food
    components (e.g., fat, carbohydrate, protein, or ingredients with
    specific food factors) present per serving.
    (A) Using specific Atwater factors (i. e., the Atwater method) given
    in Table 13, ``Energy Value of Foods--Basis and Derivation,'' by A. L.
    Merrill and B. K. Watt, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)
    Handbook No. 74 (slightly revised, 1973), which is incorporated by
    reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51 and is
    available from the Office of Nutritional Products, Labeling and Dietary
    Supplements (HFS-800), Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition,
    Food and Drug Administration, 5100 Paint Branch Pkwy., College Park, MD
    20740, or may be inspected at the Office of the Federal Register, 800
    North Capitol St. NW., suite 700, Washington, DC.;
    (B) Using the general factors of 4, 4, and 9 calories per gram for
    protein, total carbohydrate, and total fat, respectively, as described
    in USDA Handbook No. 74 (slightly revised 1973) pp. 9-11, which is
    incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR
    part 51 (the availability of this incorporation by reference is given in
    paragraph (c)(1)(i)(A) of this section);

    [[Page 25]]

    (C) Using the general factors of 4, 4, and 9 calories per gram for
    protein, total carbohydrate less the amount of insoluble dietary fiber,
    and total fat, respectively, as described in USDA Handbook No. 74
    (slightly revised 1973) pp. 9-11, which is incorporated by reference in
    accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51 (the availability of
    this incorporation by reference is given in paragraph (c)(1)(i)(A) of
    this section;
    (D) Using data for specific food factors for particular foods or
    ingredients approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and
    provided in parts 172 or 184 of this chapter, or by other means, as
    appropriate; or
    (E) Using bomb calorimetry data subtracting 1.25 calories per gram
    protein to correct for incomplete digestibility, as described in USDA
    Handbook No. 74 (slightly revised 1973) p. 10, which is incorporated by
    reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51 (the
    availability of this incorporation by reference is given in paragraph
    (c)(1)(i)(A) of this section).

    ...

    (6) ``Carbohydrate, total'' or ``Total carbohydrate'': A statement
    of the number of grams of total carbohydrate in a serving expressed to
    the nearest gram, except that if a serving contains less than 1 gram,
    the statement ``Contains less than 1 gram'' or ``less than 1 gram'' may
    be used as an alternative, or if the serving contains less than 0.5
    gram, the content may be expressed as zero. Total carbohydrate content
    shall be calculated by subtraction of the sum of the crude protein,
    total fat, moisture, and ash from the total weight of the food. This
    calculation method is described in A. L. Merrill and B. K. Watt,
    ``Energy Value of Foods--Basis and Derivation,'' USDA Handbook 74
    (slightly revised 1973) pp. 2 and 3, which is incorporated by reference
    in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51 (the availability
    of this incorporation by reference is given in paragraph (c)(1)(i)(A) of
    this section).
    (i) ``Dietary fiber'': A statement of the number of grams of total
    dietary fiber in a serving, indented and expressed to the nearest gram,
    except that if a serving contains less than 1 gram, declaration of
    dietary fiber is not required or, alternatively, the statement
    ``Contains less than 1 gram'' or ``less than 1 gram'' may be used, and
    if the serving contains less than 0.5 gram, the content may be expressed
    as zero. Except as provided for in paragraph (f) of this section, if
    dietary fiber content is not required and as a result, not declared, the
    statement ``Not a significant source of dietary fiber'' shall be placed
    at the bottom of the table of nutrient values in the same type size.
    (A) ``Soluble fiber'' (VOLUNTARY): A statement of the number of
    grams of soluble dietary fiber in a serving may be declared voluntarily
    except when a claim is made on the label or in labeling about soluble fiber, label
    declaration shall be required. Soluble fiber content shall be indented
    under dietary fiber and expressed to the nearest gram, except that if a
    serving contains less than 1 gram, the statement ``Contains less than 1
    gram'' or ``less than 1 gram'' may be used as an alternative, and if the
    serving contains less than 0.5 gram, the content may be expressed as
    zero.
    (B) ``Insoluble fiber'' (VOLUNTARY): A statement of the number of
    grams of insoluble dietary fiber in a serving may be declared
    voluntarily except that when a claim is made on the label or in labeling
    about insoluble fiber, label declaration shall be required. Insoluble
    fiber content shall be indented under dietary fiber and expressed to the
    nearest gram except that if a serving contains less than 1 gram, the
    statement ``Contains less than 1 gram'' or ``less than 1 gram'' may be
    used as an alternative, and if the serving contains less than 0.5 gram,
    the content may be expressed as zero.
    (ii) ``Sugars'': A statement of the number of grams of sugars in a
    serving, except that label declaration of sugars content is not required
    for products that contain less than 1 gram of sugars in a serving if no
    claims are made about sweeteners, sugars, or sugar alcohol content.
    Except as provided for in paragraph (f) of this section, if a statement
    of the sugars content is not required and, as a result, not declared,
    the statement ``Not a significant source of sugars'' shall be placed at
    the bottom of the table of nutrient values in the same type size. Sugars
    shall be defined as the sum of all free mono- and disaccharides (such as
    glucose, fructose, lactose, and sucrose). Sugars content shall be
    indented and expressed to the nearest gram, except that if a serving
    contains less than 1 gram, the statement ``Contains less then 1 gram''
    or ``less than 1 gram'' may be used as an alternative, and if the
    serving contains less than 0.5 gram, the content may be expressed as
    zero.
    (iii) ``Sugar alcohol'' (VOLUNTARY): A statement of the number of
    grams of sugar alcohols in a serving may be declared voluntarily on the
    label, except that when a claim is made on the label or in labeling
    about sugar alcohol or sugars when sugar alcohols are present in the
    food, sugar alcohol content shall be declared. For nutrition labeling
    purposes, sugar alcohols are defined as the sum of saccharide
    derivatives in which a hydroxyl group replaces a ketone or aldehyde
    group and whose use in the food is listed by FDA (e.g., mannitol or
    xylitol) or is generally recognized as safe (e.g., sorbitol). In lieu of
    the term ``sugar alcohol,'' the name of the specific sugar alcohol
    (e.g., ``xylitol'') present in the food may be used in the nutrition
    label provided that only one sugar alcohol is present in the food. Sugar
    alcohol content shall be indented and expressed to the nearest gram,
    except that if a serving contains less than 1 gram, the statement
    ``Contains less then 1 gram'' or ``less than 1 gram'' may be used as an
    alternative, and if the serving contains less than 0.5 gram, the content
    may be expressed as zero.
    (iv) ``Other carbohydrate'' (VOLUNTARY): A statement of the number
    of grams of other carbohydrates may be declared voluntarily. Other
    carbohydrates shall be defined as the difference between total
    carbohydrate and the sum of dietary fiber, sugars, and sugar alcohol,
    except that if sugar alcohol is not declared (even if present), it shall
    be defined as the difference between total carbohydrate and the sum of
    dietary fiber and sugars. Other carbohydrate content shall be indented
    and expressed to the nearest gram, except that if a serving contains
    less than 1 gram, the statement ``Contains less than 1 gram'' or ``less
    than 1 gram'' may be used as an alternative, and if the serving contains
    less than 0.5 gram, the content may be expressed as zero.
    It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.
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  5. #5
    nevigsawkufelgnisaton in10city's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Elliot0409 View Post
    Ok..then my question is:

    how do they figure out carbs, fat, protein etc..etc..???
    Read the labels or look food up on http://www.nutritiondata.com
    It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.
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