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  1. #1
    Registered User wanttobefit's Avatar
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    Question Amount of Calories in Drained Rice

    Would anyone know the amount of calories (1 cup) in starch drained rice.

    Accoding to calorie king - 1 cup cooked rice is ~205 to 250cal

    I boil the Basmati long grain rice in lots of water and when it is cooked I drain out all the starch, and rinse the . I have always eaten this way, since my mom uses this method to cook rice.

    If anyone knows I would appreciate the feedback.

    Thanks
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  2. #2
    The Little Water Bear Thunder_Bunny's Avatar
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    i'm not sure rinsing it does anything.
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    Registered User wanttobefit's Avatar
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    Hi Thunder_bunny

    This is what I wrote...
    "I boil the Basmati long grain rice in lots of water and when it is cooked I drain out all the starch", and then I rinse the rice.

    So, I understand that rinsing does nothing, but draining all the excess water which is mostly starch must make a difference.
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    Buff bride to be imperfectly_lou's Avatar
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    I would just weigh the rice uncooked and calculate the calories that way.
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    Member sweetphysique's Avatar
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    I have heard that rinsing cottage cheese can get rid of its lactose, but I have never heard of draining all the starch out of rice. I know you can drain *excess* starch out of pasta, though. Has anyone else heard of this? If so, please post, because I am looking to cut down on my starch and I love rice, so if this works I will try it. Thanks!
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    Registered User wanttobefit's Avatar
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    It is the same concept as draining out the excess starch out of pasta.

    Eg: I take one cup uncooked rice, soak it for 20 min in warm water. Then I bring 5 cups of water to a boil, then add the soaked rice into the boiling water. When the rice gets cooked ( tender) I draing out all the water. If you let this drained water stand in a glass you will see that when it cools down it becomes thick (starch).

    The rice that I cook this way comes out very fluffy, not sticky.
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    GOOOO COCKS!!!!! Hibiscus09's Avatar
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    I believe this helps to make the rice less clumpy, but does not effect its caloric value. According to this link, it also gets rid of the vitamins, however, not in the case of brown rice.

    http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/ck_c...820432,00.html

    Should rice be rinsed before using? *Obtained from a healthfood site.

    Rinsing brown rice is a good idea. You will not rinse away any nutrients. Some white rice millers add nutrients back to the rice after the bran is stripped off. When you wash white rice, therefore, you may be rinsing off something of nutritive value. Since brown rice is a whole grain and still has the bran in tact, the nutrients are safe inside the kernel. You may want to rinse brown rice since there may be some field dust left on it after harvesting.


    Yet another:

    Rice and pasta -- As with fruits and vegetables, people often wash valuable nutrients down the drain when preparing rice and pasta.

    "Rinsing rice before cooking is neither necessary nor recommended," Newgent says. Enriched rice is white rice that has had iron, thiamin, riboflavin and niacin sprayed onto it, and if the enrichment mixture is in a powder on the surface, washing the rice washes away these vitamins and minerals. Rinsing pasta after cooking has a similar vitamin-robbing effect. Although rinsing may help prevent pasta from sticking, using plenty of water to cook the pasta and stirring it frequently are better methods to prevent gumminess and stickiness.


    That made me think of the fact that I usually add a teaspoon of oil (extra virgin olive oil) to the water to prevent sticking.
    Last edited by Hibiscus09; 07-13-2004 at 09:09 AM.
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