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  1. #1
    Up the punx! Seldini's Avatar
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    Lifting with plate in forearm

    Long story short, I had a nasty broken arm in high school that required a titanium plate in my forearm to fix (five screws, about six inches long, starting about an inch from my wrist). Since last September I joined a new gym and I've been doing 'real' lifting, it was all bull**** machine work before then, and its been going pretty well so far. But I've got just a couple of questions to throw out there:

    1) Does anyone around here have a similar injury and how has that effected increasing weight on deadlifts, bench press, etc? I'm still pretty light on those lifts (bench around 175x10, deadlifts 225x8) but I'm worried that as I increase, some arm problems might come up because of the plate, just looking to know what I might be in store for.

    2) Whenever I do bicep work, the forearm with the plate in it hurts like a bastard. From what I've read, that's generally because the forearm isn't strong enough to support the weight even though the bicep is. But since I only have the pain in my bad arm, I'm worried that no amount of forearm strengthening is going to fix the problem. If anyone else has had a similar injury and experience, any advice would be great. Otherwise, what are the best bicep exercises that can be done with minimal strain on the forearm?
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  2. #2
    The BACKMAN DJAuto's Avatar
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    Do you have a medical professional that you can consult? Each individual stabilization is different and requires different instructions/approaches to care.
    Bodybuilding is 60% training and 50% diet. Yes that adds up to 110%, because that's what you should be giving it. Change the inside, and the physique will follow.
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  3. #3
    Registered User ichidkiller's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Seldini View Post
    Long story short, I had a nasty broken arm in high school that required a titanium plate in my forearm to fix (five screws, about six inches long, starting about an inch from my wrist). Since last September I joined a new gym and I've been doing 'real' lifting, it was all bull**** machine work before then, and its been going pretty well so far. But I've got just a couple of questions to throw out there:

    1) Does anyone around here have a similar injury and how has that effected increasing weight on deadlifts, bench press, etc? I'm still pretty light on those lifts (bench around 175x10, deadlifts 225x8) but I'm worried that as I increase, some arm problems might come up because of the plate, just looking to know what I might be in store for.

    2) Whenever I do bicep work, the forearm with the plate in it hurts like a bastard. From what I've read, that's generally because the forearm isn't strong enough to support the weight even though the bicep is. But since I only have the pain in my bad arm, I'm worried that no amount of forearm strengthening is going to fix the problem. If anyone else has had a similar injury and experience, any advice would be great. Otherwise, what are the best bicep exercises that can be done with minimal strain on the forearm?

    Now wait, I can see the furure. If and when you see a Doctor, they are going to tell you "don't put undues stress on the affected arm" You know why they will tell you that? it is because if the Doc says "go for it. Try to curl 150 pounds" and you get hurt the doctor Is liabel for telling you advice that resulted in your injury. Me, I don't know you and you don't know me. So, I will tell you "go for it, try to curl 150 pounds."

    No, just kidding. The guy is right. Every situation regarding post surgery ORIF of forearm is unique. My advice: Train around it. Do things that don't cause pain to the repaired area. Be careful. Go see a Doc if you want. Doctor will tell you the same I think. Peace.
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  4. #4
    Registered User 2hard2fixagain's Avatar
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    1. I do not have a similar injury. Don't hunt boogers, though. Lift only what you are comfortable doing, and go up in weight slowly to avoid injury. If you can lift 205 pounds 30 times on bench press but the moment you go to 230 it bothers your arm, stick with lighter weight.

    2. How do you do bicep work? It is generally more comfortable for the forearms not to be braced-don't use a preacher type bench to do bicep work on. do standing or sitting curls with the weight dropped at your side, or try standing barbell curls. Also-It will probabally help to do some wrist flexion exercises/forearm work. Just remember to keep everything light and comfortable. Once everything in your arm gets used to moving every which way and you build the muscle around it to help, your problems will likley be minimized.
    Last edited by 2hard2fixagain; 03-21-2011 at 02:02 PM. Reason: breacher-preacher
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  5. #5
    Registered User ichidkiller's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Seldini View Post
    Long story short, I had a nasty broken arm in high school that required a titanium plate in my forearm to fix (five screws, about six inches long, starting about an inch from my wrist). Since last September I joined a new gym and I've been doing 'real' lifting, it was all bull**** machine work before then, and its been going pretty well so far. But I've got just a couple of questions to throw out there:

    1) Does anyone around here have a similar injury and how has that effected increasing weight on deadlifts, bench press, etc? I'm still pretty light on those lifts (bench around 175x10, deadlifts 225x8) but I'm worried that as I increase, some arm problems might come up because of the plate, just looking to know what I might be in store for.

    2) Whenever I do bicep work, the forearm with the plate in it hurts like a bastard. From what I've read, that's generally because the forearm isn't strong enough to support the weight even though the bicep is. But since I only have the pain in my bad arm, I'm worried that no amount of forearm strengthening is going to fix the problem. If anyone else has had a similar injury and experience, any advice would be great. Otherwise, what are the best bicep exercises that can be done with minimal strain on the forearm?
    here is another thought on your surgically repaired forearm. one indication to remove the implanted hardware is if the hardware causes you pain. The plate in your arm is not necesarily permanent. it can be removed. Your bone heals after about 6 weeks. Maybe it is not the exercise that is bothering you but the plate. If it becomes a problem the plate can be removed in surgery that is much simpler than the one to put the plate in. Just a thought.
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  6. #6
    Registered User stewartjohn's Avatar
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    I've had a similar injury, I broke my ulna and radius in both arms in a motocross accident and have plates in both. The biggest advice I can give is to know your body and take it slow. The fact of the matter is, you'll have discomfort, especially when just starting to workout. Remember, those are foreign objects and they were necessary to heal an injury. That all being said, as long as your injury has properly healed, you should have no trouble getting in your workouts.

    1. Strengthen your forearms. It's not going to fix your problems, but it will help immensely with discomfort during bicep exercises. It's easy to neglect, and normally there is atrophy from having this injury; however, to get back to form you need those forearm muscles for support.

    2. As a previous poster stated, try to avoid exercises where your elbow is the fulcrum point and your bicep is stationary, i.e. preacher curl exercises. I really find that this puts unnecessary and unnatural pressure on your forearm.

    3. Press exercises like bench and chest presses may cause some discomfort. If you start to feel pain then it's too much weight, pump the brakes and just scale down.

    4. If you still want to incorporate the preacher into your workout do it on the cable machine.

    Just take it slow and you'll be fine. Don't do too much too fast. It's been about 10 years since my broken arms and I still have some discomfort, but for the most part they don't get me too much trouble. Hope this helps.
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