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View Full Version : If you are a martial artist, ACT like one.



user8073964251
08-09-2006, 03:29 PM
I train in submission grappling as well as boxing. I compete in both and I enjoy the competition.

HOWEVER, just because I like to "fight" on the mat or in the ring, doesn't mean I like to fight on the street. I've been approached several times when I was wearing something MMA related. Such as an Atama shirt or a TapouT hat... I suppose that people see that as a target.

MMA in America has unfortunantly brought along a ton of bullsh*t with it. Guys that train in the arts with the intent of using their skills on the street. I've seen and been around guys that attempt to learn certain techniques to pick fights with people that they barely know, to "make an example."

The whole point of this rant is also the point that will be under the microscope as MMA goes mainstream. People that don't know MMA assume that it is barbaric cagefighting. Meanwhile, people like myself who do the sport not for the love of violence, but for the love of competition, are constantly scrutinized as "thugs".

I'll probably get flamed for this rant, but so be it. I just want to express my opinion that if you do fight or compete, remember that you are representing a fairly new sport to the public eye. I'm tired of seeing punks in fight gear thinking that a MMA shirt and a few classes has turned them into a deadly street fighter. Ok... end of rant.

Swole4Life
08-09-2006, 04:00 PM
I train in submission grappling as well as boxing. I compete in both and I enjoy the competition.

HOWEVER, just because I like to "fight" on the mat or in the ring, doesn't mean I like to fight on the street. I've been approached several times when I was wearing something MMA related. Such as an Atama shirt or a TapouT hat... I suppose that people see that as a target.

MMA in America has unfortunantly brought along a ton of bullsh*t with it. Guys that train in the arts with the intent of using their skills on the street. I've seen and been around guys that attempt to learn certain techniques to pick fights with people that they barely know, to "make an example."

The whole point of this rant is also the point that will be under the microscope as MMA goes mainstream. People that don't know MMA assume that it is barbaric cagefighting. Meanwhile, people like myself who do the sport not for the love of violence, but for the love of competition, are constantly scrutinized as "thugs".

I'll probably get flamed for this rant, but so be it. I just want to express my opinion that if you do fight or compete, remember that you are representing a fairly new sport to the public eye. I'm tired of seeing punks in fight gear thinking that a MMA shirt and a few classes has turned them into a deadly street fighter. Ok... end of rant.

I have a few fight shirts... never been approached because of it...

T-bomb
08-09-2006, 04:07 PM
I agree that there are a lot of dumbasses out there who get into the sport for the wrong reasons and do it because they wanna look tough. People like that shouldnt get involved with the sport.

Nights
08-09-2006, 06:28 PM
I agree that there are a lot of dumbasses out there who get into the sport for the wrong reasons and do it because they wanna look tough. People like that shouldnt get involved with the sport.

20 bucks says 90% people who train MMA think they are tougher than people who don't.

TheBlueDevil
08-09-2006, 06:55 PM
20 bucks says 90% people who train MMA think they are tougher than people who don't.


This is mostly the ones that have been trainining for under a year thinkin they became a badass over night. People who have been training longer simply have no desire to get in street fights

Nights
08-09-2006, 06:57 PM
This is mostly the ones that have been trainining for under a year thinkin they became a badass over night. People who have been training longer simply have no desire to get in street fights

True. I was thinking of everyone in my school who got into it for 2 months and thought they could beat the **** out of everyone.

The pro boxers at my gym are the nicest guys you could meet, but holy **** would they fvvk you up, haha.

Forge3
08-09-2006, 07:57 PM
With martial arts and any fighting styles/approaches you have:

1.) People who actually enjoy the sport/art and build their character indirectly through the challenge.

2.) People who misuse the sport because they are insecure and get a booster shot of 'false' confidence by being agressive as opposed to assertive.

And of coarse other variations on the theme. No different from any other walks of life. What can be so appealing about Kung-Fu is, although it can be deadly with advanced practicioners, it is multi-layered, incorporating mind, body and heart/spirit into action.

I always admire people who have power and self-control. they are of the true warrior tradition of Shaolin, Samarai or otherwise. Those who get into fighting for self-glorification through power-over others are false warriors and an insult to the true spirit of the sport IMHO. Those who lose/win with dignity and grace, persist in the face of all opposition, and utilize both their strengths and the weaknesses to perfect their skills are of a high calibre. So imo, the warrior's way isn't about cultivating power as much as utilizing it with skill, grace and responsibility. These people understand what it means to have 'heart'.
Peace.

LatsMakeTheMan
08-09-2006, 09:07 PM
I think for MOST people, training in MMA, Muay Thai, BJJ or whatever is a very humbling experience.

You learn very quickly that no matter how good you are, there's always someone out there who can beat your ass. Badly.

billz015
08-09-2006, 10:28 PM
For the most part, dude's who just want to get better at fighting just so they can whup on ppl in the streets, they have SPS.

For the younger crowds it's called, SMS. Small Man Syndrome, which means they are lacking in one specific area and want to make up for that area with one thing or another.

I honestly believe that people who really know how to fight, don't.

Emang8
08-09-2006, 10:39 PM
You learn very quickly that no matter how good you are, there's always someone out there who can beat your ass. Badly.

Yeah, my dad taught me that at an early age. I still haven't met that guy though lol. I was never a bully but I would never back down from anybody if they tried to start anything with me or my friends. I have not been in a real fight since the 8th grade. Because I don't act like a douchebag in public and do everything in my power to not use force upon others.

Kane Fan
08-09-2006, 10:39 PM
never had that problem
but I dont really have any Tapout gear or anything
thought about it
there was a boxing shirt I saw in a Ringside magazine that I wanted

user8073964251
08-10-2006, 11:09 AM
With martial arts and any fighting styles/approaches you have:

1.) People who actually enjoy the sport/art and build their character indirectly through the challenge.

2.) People who misuse the sport because they are insecure and get a booster shot of 'false' confidence by being agressive as opposed to assertive.

And of coarse other variations on the theme. No different from any other walks of life. What can be so appealing about Kung-Fu is, although it can be deadly with advanced practicioners, it is multi-layered, incorporating mind, body and heart/spirit into action.

I always admire people who have power and self-control. they are of the true warrior tradition of Shaolin, Samarai or otherwise. Those who get into fighting for self-glorification through power-over others are false warriors and an insult to the true spirit of the sport IMHO. Those who lose/win with dignity and grace, persist in the face of all opposition, and utilize both their strengths and the weaknesses to perfect their skills are of a high calibre. So imo, the warrior's way isn't about cultivating power as much as utilizing it with skill, grace and responsibility. These people understand what it means to have 'heart'.
Peace.


Reps. AWESOME post!

Most of the people that have been in/around a form of martial arts are very nice, calm, respectable people.

IMO, to be dedicated to an art or style enough to learn a lot requires a ton of desire. More desire than it would take if your sole purpose of learning was to use the techniques on the street.

I just wish more people coming INTO MMA would understand that. It seems like the "new wave" of people trying to learn, are all learning with the intent of trying to be the baddest guy on the block, and that takes away from the sport tremendously.

mfdff10
08-10-2006, 11:12 AM
I get that all the time my friend... unfortunatly people see MMA as only fighting.. they don't see the discipline and respect we have for one another

user8073964251
08-10-2006, 11:19 AM
^
As a martial artist, I think I have a responsibility NOT to fight outside of the ring/mat.

IMO, it's like in Spiderman, where he learns that "with great power, comes great responsibility."

I believe that it is my responsibility to the art as well as to myself to NOT use the techniques on the street. Obviously, if I got mugged or jumped, I would defend myself to the best of my knowledge. But knowing how to hurt someone doesn't mean you have the right too.

Hunterchilla
08-10-2006, 11:30 AM
Now people are getting into the sport, learning some martial art, and then thinking that they can take anyone who deosnt train. They act tough because they train in "MMA" and it gives everyone else a bad name. Me personally I can understand people kinda wanting to fight people who wear these MMA shirts.

Theres these kids who come to my academy, all decked out in sprawl shorts, wand t-shirts, MMA beenies, and they are just whitebelts. They walk around wearing T-shirts that say "TAP OUT OR PASS OUT", etc.

I mean if they want to let everyone who see's them know that they are tough, someone who wants to prove otherwise is obviously going to step to you.

raprazant
08-10-2006, 11:41 AM
So true. When i bounced in college it was easy to deal with most people except for the occasional wrestling team outing but now it's much different. I bounce at a club in dc now and it seems there's always some group of sticks who think they're the next ultimate fighter. Luckily they hardly ever have any actual streetfighting skills. As was said though the corollary it seems is that anyone who respects the sport is never out looking to hurt someone or prove something.

Kane Fan
08-10-2006, 01:05 PM
With martial arts and any fighting styles/approaches you have:

1.) People who actually enjoy the sport/art and build their character indirectly through the challenge.

2.) People who misuse the sport because they are insecure and get a booster shot of 'false' confidence by being agressive as opposed to assertive.

And of coarse other variations on the theme. No different from any other walks of life. What can be so appealing about Kung-Fu is, although it can be deadly with advanced practicioners, it is multi-layered, incorporating mind, body and heart/spirit into action.

I always admire people who have power and self-control. they are of the true warrior tradition of Shaolin, Samarai or otherwise. Those who get into fighting for self-glorification through power-over others are false warriors and an insult to the true spirit of the sport IMHO. Those who lose/win with dignity and grace, persist in the face of all opposition, and utilize both their strengths and the weaknesses to perfect their skills are of a high calibre. So imo, the warrior's way isn't about cultivating power as much as utilizing it with skill, grace and responsibility. These people understand what it means to have 'heart'.
Peace.

more like the romantic ideal your focusing on there
in fuedal Japan the Samurai trained thier skills by maiming and killing villagers
that's hardly the honorable sence I care to think of when it comes to martial arts

Jason762
08-10-2006, 03:06 PM
I train in submission grappling as well as boxing. I compete in both and I enjoy the competition.

HOWEVER, just because I like to "fight" on the mat or in the ring, doesn't mean I like to fight on the street. I've been approached several times when I was wearing something MMA related. Such as an Atama shirt or a TapouT hat... I suppose that people see that as a target.

MMA in America has unfortunantly brought along a ton of bullsh*t with it. Guys that train in the arts with the intent of using their skills on the street. I've seen and been around guys that attempt to learn certain techniques to pick fights with people that they barely know, to "make an example."

The whole point of this rant is also the point that will be under the microscope as MMA goes mainstream. People that don't know MMA assume that it is barbaric cagefighting. Meanwhile, people like myself who do the sport not for the love of violence, but for the love of competition, are constantly scrutinized as "thugs".

I'll probably get flamed for this rant, but so be it. I just want to express my opinion that if you do fight or compete, remember that you are representing a fairly new sport to the public eye. I'm tired of seeing punks in fight gear thinking that a MMA shirt and a few classes has turned them into a deadly street fighter. Ok... end of rant.

Word. I actually wear 1 shirt (http://www.graciestore.com/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=23_26&products_id=35) and I wear it and make friends because of it. I meet many other BJJist and people who are interested in the sport.

It's a good friend getter and a converstation starter :-P

LatsMakeTheMan
08-10-2006, 06:12 PM
Word. I actually wear 1 shirt (http://www.graciestore.com/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=23_26&products_id=35) and I wear it and make friends because of it. I meet many other BJJist and people who are interested in the sport.

It's a good friend getter and a converstation starter :-P

That's a cool shirt, I might pick one of those up.

Forge3
08-10-2006, 06:45 PM
more like the romantic ideal your focusing on there
in fuedal Japan the Samurai trained thier skills by maiming and killing villagers
that's hardly the honorable sence I care to think of when it comes to martial arts

Indeed. The example you give shows no honor. Part of the samarai ideal was zen like self-control not using helpless villagers as target practice. I suppose there can be corruption in any system, religious, spiritual, or otherwise. No matter how noble it may seem at first glance. The ideals I mentioned I still stand by. They don't have to be dressed in the mantle of any title. They stand on their own to reflect the inner strength of the individual. And I will always respect them.
Peace.

hittman
08-10-2006, 07:20 PM
With martial arts and any fighting styles/approaches you have:

1.) People who actually enjoy the sport/art and build their character indirectly through the challenge.

2.) People who misuse the sport because they are insecure and get a booster shot of 'false' confidence by being agressive as opposed to assertive.

And of coarse other variations on the theme. No different from any other walks of life. What can be so appealing about Kung-Fu is, although it can be deadly with advanced practicioners, it is multi-layered, incorporating mind, body and heart/spirit into action.

I always admire people who have power and self-control. they are of the true warrior tradition of Shaolin, Samarai or otherwise. Those who get into fighting for self-glorification through power-over others are false warriors and an insult to the true spirit of the sport IMHO. Those who lose/win with dignity and grace, persist in the face of all opposition, and utilize both their strengths and the weaknesses to perfect their skills are of a high calibre. So imo, the warrior's way isn't about cultivating power as much as utilizing it with skill, grace and responsibility. These people understand what it means to have 'heart'.
Peace.

one of the better posts i've ever read. reps.

dixon
08-10-2006, 07:25 PM
Those who get into fighting for self-glorification through power-over others are false warriors and an insult to the true spirit of the sport IMHO.

But that's exactly why I got involved in sport mma, because I want and love to compete and win. That is a perfectly normal and healthy thing.

NINEZeRO
08-10-2006, 07:45 PM
What is the difference between a martial artist who fights/competes in the ring/dojo to test/train themselves and someone who trains hard and wants to test themselves against a huge/strong/fast or any other way formidable opponent outside the ring/cage/dojo? Some of you keep talking about the tradition of samurai/kung-fu. Well to my knowledge alot of people back then trained and went to other dojo's/temples to fight the rival masters to test themselves out. Is it so different if a so called "SMS" person trains his ass off and wants to test himself against a huge muscular guy -- or some other way around?

Forge3
08-10-2006, 08:58 PM
But that's exactly why I got involved in sport mma, because I want and love to compete and win. That is a perfectly normal and healthy thing.

I am referring to the OP about 'abuse' of power. Specifically glorying over someone elses pain and defeat in and of it self. I do not mean that self-satisfaction through honorable victory over an opponent is wrong. I refer to preying on the weak on the streets or picking random fights in order to booster false confidence.
Peace.

Forge3
08-10-2006, 09:16 PM
What is the difference between a martial artist who fights/competes in the ring/dojo to test/train themselves and someone who trains hard and wants to test themselves against a huge/strong/fast or any other way formidable opponent outside the ring/cage/dojo? Some of you keep talking about the tradition of samurai/kung-fu. Well to my knowledge alot of people back then trained and went to other dojo's/temples to fight the rival masters to test themselves out. Is it so different if a so called "SMS" person trains his ass off and wants to test himself against a huge muscular guy -- or some other way around?

If the masters accepted the challenge. Taking on a more skillful opponent was one way for a student to challenge themselves. It was known and understood that tests and training in the shaolin tradition are for developing the inner-self and outter self. In overcoming great and seemingly inhuman challenges, Shaolin masters cultivated amazing skill and equanimity. In schools uncorrupted, the goal was not just uncanny physical prowess but enlightenment.

These goals do not belong to MMA proper, but the simple aspect of reaching beyond one's limit in competition and finding 'heart' as a champion are applicable. Often, not wanting to sound fortune cookie-ish, the biggest opponent is oneself. Even if the physical competition exceeds strength and or skills. The mind plays a larger role than some think in the midst of battle/competition for both participants. When one has their mind in the 'right' zone/place than the body can be pushed beyond expectations.

Peace.

paycheck
08-10-2006, 09:23 PM
people who dont know how to fight always want to fight those who do know how to fight dont.

thats how it is, if you see a person fighting or someone who boosts about beating a guy up and you watch him fight his form and what not is not right. Its sloppy so you know that he's not a trained fighter. Any martial artist knows, you can be a cocky guy but training humbles you.

Just read stories about Frank Shamrock being approached @ a home depot for telling a guy he budged in line. The guy went berserk and chased frank to his car.

dixon
08-10-2006, 10:41 PM
Q
Tell us about the other incident?

Frank
The second one was a Home Depot in LA, I was standing in line and a guy just cuts in a head of me and puts his stuff on the counter, and I said, hey dude, the line's back there, and he said yeah whatever, and he just stayed there. Anyway, I tried talking to him a few more times and he just told me to **** off. Anyway, I apologized to the people around me, I just had one item, he goes out, I follow him out to his car, I didn't want any trouble but I just wanted him to get it, so I tell him that his actions weren't very nice, he said, look man, I told you to **** off, get out of here, (he made a move) I defended myself with a front kick to the stomach, he bent over, then I kneed him in the face, he lifted his head up and I got him with my right hand, and his face just exploded. So he falls on the ground, reaches into his back pocket then pulls out this huge knife, and he's just about to throw it at me, and like any good fighter, I RAN…I just ran around, back into the store, and ran out the back door and drove home..."

mjfan12
08-11-2006, 12:19 AM
Well usually people that train go in with violence on their mind but eventually the martial spirit takes over and they realize that the more you know how to hurt someone, the less you feel like doing that.

Thats why I started MA. I wanted to stopped being picked on and beat some bullies. but I never did that and talked my way out of altercations.

Like spiderman.

"with great power, comes great responsibility"

mma may be less structured than traditional martial arts, but they are arts nontheless and hopefully people realize that.

mjfan12
08-11-2006, 12:23 AM
Q
Tell us about the other incident?

Frank
The second one was a Home Depot in LA, I was standing in line and a guy just cuts in a head of me and puts his stuff on the counter, and I said, hey dude, the line's back there, and he said yeah whatever, and he just stayed there. Anyway, I tried talking to him a few more times and he just told me to **** off. Anyway, I apologized to the people around me, I just had one item, he goes out, I follow him out to his car, I didn't want any trouble but I just wanted him to get it, so I tell him that his actions weren't very nice, he said, look man, I told you to **** off, get out of here, (he made a move) I defended myself with a front kick to the stomach, he bent over, then I kneed him in the face, he lifted his head up and I got him with my right hand, and his face just exploded. So he falls on the ground, reaches into his back pocket then pulls out this huge knife, and he's just about to throw it at me, and like any good fighter, I RAN…I just ran around, back into the store, and ran out the back door and drove home..."

whose this? shamrock?

picking fights is never good no matter what. Alex Gong (RIP) a great kickboxer and one of the founders of Fairtex USA was doing something, I forget what and a car hit and ran something. Alex ran after the car and the dude inside had a gin and he killed him.

a moment of rage ended his life. it totally want worth it to confront the guy. People this day and age are crazy and arent worth getting kiled over.

delta9
08-11-2006, 12:17 PM
20 bucks says 90% people who train MMA think they are tougher than people who don't.

because they are tougher

most people in gyms are very humble, you can still tell from their attitude how they act but inside the gym thinking your the man of the house won't work out unless you really are the man of the house but then you'd be a coach.

delta9
08-11-2006, 12:26 PM
20 bucks says 90% people who train MMA think they are tougher than people who don't.

because they are tougher

most people in gyms are very humble, you can still tell from their attitude how they act but inside the gym thinking your the man of the house won't work out unless you really are the man of the house but then you'd be a coach.

HardGainer82
08-11-2006, 01:04 PM
20 bucks says 90% people who train MMA think they are tougher than people who don't.
Well...aren't they? I mean, I'm not a fan at ALL of walking around thinking you're a hardass, but people who train are generally tougher than people who don't, wouldn't you think?