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View Full Version : Should I do deadlifts and squats at my age?



drglfr
06-05-2006, 08:22 PM
I was just at 24 hour fitness because I was thinking about joining being that its close to my house.. I was able to sit down with a trainer to discuss my fitness goals. I explained to the trainer that I wanted to lose fat especially around the mid section and gain muscle. I asked the trainer about deadlifts and squats and he told me that theres absolutely no reason in the world that I should do deadlifts or even squats especially at my age (36) Everything that I have ever read about lifting weights whether it was in a magizine or on this forum says that deadlifts, squats, and bench press are the most important exercises to do. I am now completely confused. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

gsegal
06-05-2006, 08:29 PM
Give me a break! If it was up to 24-hour fitness pseudo trainers, they would have everyone doing bicep curls with their eyes closed, hands tied behind their back and standing on one leg. The best exercises one can do to build strength and muscle mass is the big three. Lift squats, deadlifts and bench heavy and insert supportive exercises where lacking to reach your goals.

dapper
06-05-2006, 08:30 PM
From my experience I will say this.

I have done deadlifts and I have done squats, also done some leg presses, but now this is what I do and I will tell you one thing. You might hate leg day but this is what has made a difference for me.

Lower 1 done on Tuesdays supersets at that
Box Squats
Stationary Lunges

Sumo Squats
Romanian Deadlifts

Wednesday is a booster shot day of 100 reps of these
Narrow Stance box squats
Seated Leg Curls

Friday Lower 2 Supersets also
Front Squat
Deadlifts

Bulgarian Squats
Glute Ham Raises

Saturday Booster Shot 2
Quad Dominant Leg Press
Hamstring Dominant Leg Press

I personally believe that all this leg work has aided with everythign else that I do it has added overall strength to my body as well. When I started doing this I started showing improvement in my measurements. I now notice my quads are harder and when I am walking upstairs I can actually see the muscle coming thru.

Just my .02 cents but I think both of those exercises should be in everyone's routines always or you are just pretending, unless you physically cannot do them.

MarkY
06-05-2006, 08:52 PM
I think there might be a few people on this forum that agree with me when I say that this "trainer" you speak of is a flipp'n MORON.

dapper
06-05-2006, 08:57 PM
I will add something else. I have noticed trainers at my gym never have people do squats, deadlifts of any kind. If they do bench it is with a machine. I have not asked one of them but I bet the owners tell them not to have people do squats and deadlifts because if they use inproper form that customer may be albe to sew the gym. I have noticed one or two trainers have people stand on a half ball thing and use a smith machine to do squats but the feet are way way out in front of them so their back I guess can stay straight. So when theys stand they are actually pushing like some sort of leg press.

Just another opinion but I would put money on it they are told not to because of law suits.

drglfr
06-05-2006, 09:00 PM
Thanks for the advice. I did however forget to mention that the trainer said my height is a factor as well. Since I'm 36 years old and 6'5 the risk of injury if done wrong is high. Physically I feel capable of doing them but my knees do make cracking sounds everytime I try to do a squat but they don't seem to hurt.

Ben N
06-05-2006, 09:03 PM
I think there might be a few people on this forum that agree with me when I say that this "trainer" you speak of is a flipp'n MORON.


Agreed!
I'd stay away from that knuckleheaded "trainer"!
He's probably stuck in curl limbo somewhere...
I've been on the Mark Rippetoe "Starting Strength" program for not quite 2 weeks now (you should consider buying the book too), so I'm really new at it. But I'll tell you that I do see and feel all around improvements ALREADY!
Just my 2 cents.
Ben N

bilnv
06-05-2006, 09:18 PM
What does he mean by "Your age"? I wish I had done more squats and deadlifts when I was "Your Age". Now I do the big three all the time and have had no problem at all.

At 6'5" squats probably won't be easy but I would still do them and work on form more than anything. I think deadlifts and benches would still work though.

Almost forgot. My knees make a lot of noise and also hurt sometimes. I have had this checked and it is not a problem in my situation. If it bothers you I would get it checked but if it does not hurt I would not worry to much about it.

lukamar
06-05-2006, 09:35 PM
he told me that theres absolutely no reason in the world that I should do deadlifts or even squats especially at my age (36).


Did he happen to mention if you were too old or too young for squats...:D
Moron Trainer was mentioned.. I'll ditto that one. LOL

Dubble G
06-05-2006, 10:24 PM
When that trainer grows up, if he ever works out and if he still has a job, He'll change his mind. For now; steer clear ~ the kid doesn't have a clue!

cuhockey
06-05-2006, 10:28 PM
At my 24 Hour Fitness, Omaha, they have many people your age doing squats , romanian deadlifts, box squats, deadlifts. When ijoined I thought the trainers would be a joke, but they aren't. I have two freinds in the western US training professional atheltes and they are cutting edge trainers. The 24 hour trtainers are not far behind---I've been impressed.

Maybe you are too tight and lack flexibility to properly do a squat. Otherwise you should be able to do it do it.

BTW I'm 55 and I do squats, front squats, romanian deadlifts and deadlifts with 20 year olds, and my form is better.

1stindoor
06-06-2006, 02:35 AM
Just my .02 cents worth here, but I started lifting just a few years younger than you are now, at 33. I've been doing squats and deads since the beginning...and while I had to start slow and light...I'm now squatting over 500, and my deadlift is stuck at 495. All this while still doing all the silly things the Army makes me do, like humping a ruck and jumping out of airplanes. Trust me, squats and deads are good for you at any age. They'll help with your overall body strength.

On a side note, I saw a video of Ronnie Coleman deadlifting something like 800 lbs not that long ago...and he's in our age bracket too.

jtroster
06-06-2006, 05:41 AM
I started doing squats and deads at age 54. My max lifts now are squats 305 and deads 225.

My constant lower back soreness went away once I started doing deads. Just find a trainer now who will show you how to do them with perfect form.

rotlex
06-06-2006, 06:05 AM
At your age? A whopping 36?! Jeez, I'm WAY over the hill at 38...squat 3 times a week and deadlift once per week. I guess I'm headed for the trauma center after my next workout. ;)

Your trainer, as most in today's "fitness center's", is an idiot. If anything, these movements are what you should be focusing on more than anything to build a strong core, especially at your age!

I know I'm late to reply on this, and am only repeating what other have pointed out, but this kind of thing just drives me nuts. I see it every morning as well at my local LA Fitness. The first thing the trainers do is show every new client how to use the machines...curls, curls, more curls, and then MAYBE a squat, in a freakin' smith machine! Drives me insane, and at times it's really difficult not to say something when I see these things.

Rant off, LOL. :)

rotlex
06-06-2006, 06:09 AM
I started doing squats and deads at age 54. My max lifts now are squats 305 and deads 225.

My constant lower back soreness went away once I started doing deads. Just find a trainer now who will show you how to do them with perfect form.

I have had a similar experience with squats and deads. I'm only 38 ;), but had lower back "issues" most of my life. I started looking more into the "big 3" maybe a year ago, and began a slow progression on my squats and deads. Much to my surprise, my back issues are all but gone. Yes, I"m VERY careful with my form and don't go nuts with the weights, but I have manged to bring my squat from a pitiful 95lbs a year ago, to around 275 for 5 now. (Yes, ATTG) :)My deads have also gone from a whopping 135, to ALMOST 315 in that same time. My back has NEVER felt better or stronger.

r_graz
06-06-2006, 06:50 AM
As soon as I convinced my trainer that I was serious about working hard to gain strength and mass, the first thing he added to my routine was squats and deadlifts. That came with a strong warning that form was of utmost importance for both of them, especially as you get tired towards the end of a set.

Haven't spoken to a trainer yet who didn't think squats were one of the most important exercises for not only legs but gains throughout the body. Leg day is a b*tch, but for me there's no greater feeling of accomplishment.

Deadlifts seem to divide them though. My trainer likes them. Others have told me flat-out "Don't do deadlifts" (my chiropracter isn't too crazy about them). Yeah, there's plenty of room to hurt yourself if you're not careful. That's why I think you've got to get the form right, and keep the weight down until you're comfortable with the exercise. I was having a really bad time with conventional deads, I'm short but my torso is long in comparison to my legs. Then I read up on sumo squats and how they work better for some people, tried them, and they seem to work for me. Whatever works, right?

The guy told you "No squats"? That's too bad, you'd be really missing out on a lot. Maybe he assumed you wanted "beach muscle"...ie. curls and bench till you drop, but skinny legs...

BTW when I saw the subject line I really expected the poster to be around 85 y/o, not someone 4 years younger than me, LOL.

Most Muscular
06-06-2006, 07:34 AM
At many gyms the trainers are told to avoid having their clients do squats or deadlifts, not because they're ineffective but to avoid the possibility of injury... true, you would think a "qualified" trainer would be able to instruct someone on how to properly do squats and deadlifts but I've seen too many of them give bad advice in the past (encouraging someone to lean over while doing squats, etc).

I also expected your age to be over 60 or so when I read the first part of your post.... not 36. Give me a break. I wouldn't have been able to build my base without those two exercises.

nuff said...

JustLost
06-06-2006, 07:40 AM
I think there might be a few people on this forum that agree with me when I say that this "trainer" you speak of is a flipp'n MORON.


And that's putting it way too kindly.

;)

phikappa
06-06-2006, 09:26 AM
You're 36!? Time to move to Florida and catch the early bird specials at Denny's.

:eek:

Body by Alex
06-06-2006, 09:32 AM
Certainly, you should do them but with more reps and less weight. Don't go heavy on the Deadlifts.

I'm 42

30-A rider
06-06-2006, 09:46 AM
I like to think of your trainer, like I think of most trainers...IDIOT!

Here is agreat education for you to determine what one is capable of at what age with regard to weight training and body building. First of all look up online these names and look up thier biographies and pictures of the: Albert Beckles, Ronnie Cloeman, Laura crevale, Bev Francis.

then go to the nastiest dirtiest gym you can find where there is little to no cardio equipment. Go at about 5 pm and just sit and watch till seven...bet you will find one of if not the strongest largest most muscular person in there is a guy/woman who is in thier 30,s 40's or even 50's. This will not only show you how strong, how heavy they lift, and the exercises people do at 30-70 can do!

Point is this, you dont have to squat and dead lift, but if you want results fast as possible, and you want to work the most benefit from the work you do in the gym...I suggest the following..DO THEM!
Again Im niot saying all, but most, including your trainer...IDIOT!

jtroster
06-06-2006, 09:52 AM
Check out this thread http://forum.bodybuilding.com/showthread.php?t=774488

Minotaur
06-06-2006, 11:46 AM
I asked the trainer about deadlifts and squats and he told me that theres absolutely no reason in the world that I should do deadlifts or even squats especially at my age (36)

At your age!? Is he kidding!? What a knob. I was 42 when I started deadlifting and squatting and doing cleans. I'm almost 49 and I'm still at it and making progress.


Everything that I have ever read about lifting weights whether it was in a magizine or on this forum says that deadlifts, squats, and bench press are the most important exercises to do.

They are. ;)

Most Muscular
06-06-2006, 12:48 PM
Certainly, you should do them but with more reps and less weight. Don't go heavy on the Deadlifts.

I'm 42

If a person can safely do them with heavy weights (i.e. no serious back injuries, etc.) then why not lift heavy with less reps? Are you a trainer?

nuff said...

Ben N
06-06-2006, 12:53 PM
If a person can safely do them with heavy weights (i.e. no serious back injuries, etc.) then why not lift heavy with less reps?...


Agreed!
If ya can bang 'em out safely, then by all means, bang 'em out!

IdahoViking
06-06-2006, 01:09 PM
With my upper back problems, would front squats be a good alternative?

Or wouldn't it really make any difference?

30-A rider
06-06-2006, 02:34 PM
What is the actual assessment of your upper back problems? From my experience most upper back problems are due to hypertonic musculature of the traps and rhomboids. This is very common in women and people who have a job that is compromising structurally and or repetitive motions that tax this upper body musculature, and they do not have the muscle mass, strength and muscle endurance to handle thier acticites of daily living. This results in hypertonicity of musculature, reactive trigger points and sometimes spasms. People think they have a skeletal biomechanical problem, when it lies with my previous explanation. If your problem is as I described, the best thing you could do is dead lift and squat to stress the back musculature into hypertrophy...which in the end will result in you being more capable to handle your activities of daily living. Again not saying this is you, but Id like to know exactly what your upper back condition was diagnosed as.

Finally, no offense to you really, so take this with a grain of salt as I mean this to be constructive, not in a degrading manner. I cant tell you how many times people have questioned me in the gym on compound movements (especially sqautting and dead lifting) when they really were not looking for answers, but looking for me to give them a loop hole/ excuse as to justify why they should not do them...all along they were looking for reason not to do them so they dont carry the guilt of not performing these exercises. Squatting and dead lifting are by far the most difficult taxing exercises in the gym anyone could do, and lots of people just dont have the guts do to the work and effort they require. They are not for the faint at heart if you are truely putting in a strong effort. The most hard core gyms keep puke buckets/garbage pails by the sqaut rack for this reason, as if you have the guts, one can easily work to the point of puking, getting dizzy, falling over and passing out...I have done all of them except for passing out. Im not saying you are this type of individual, but be sure to take a good hard look at yourself to make sure you are not looking one bit for an excuse not to do these exercises.

Ben N
06-06-2006, 02:59 PM
GREAT post A-30!
I used to get lightheaded when I started this program just a couple of weeks ago. And a few of the guys here told me why that was happening, and that it would go away after I get used to training again.
Well, after just a couple of good training sessions, I no longer get that lightheaded feeling, and I am able to lift even heavier now, and with better form too.
Just my 2 more cents. :)
Ben

ChocoChick
06-06-2006, 03:14 PM
You're 36!? Time to move to Florida and catch the early bird specials at Denny's.

:eek:

Yes, please send him down here. We need some more YOUNG squatters and deadlifters :)

GREENFEATHER
06-06-2006, 03:28 PM
DON'T DREAD THE DEAD !!! I'm 8 years older than you and I have 750 lbs in my sights! :D

MisterMak
06-06-2006, 03:32 PM
+1 on the trainer being a MORON. Do them, there is nothing like the feeling after squatting or deadlifting a bunch-o-weight.

FJ and G
06-06-2006, 04:55 PM
at 36 you are a young pup (I'm 49 and been doing deads and squats now for 2-3 years).

Double Eclipse
06-06-2006, 05:30 PM
Check this out
http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/hardgainer24.htm

scroll down to #6 and #7....pretty timely I think.I've always done squats and dead weekly since about 22 y/o.I was at a gym with several NPC guys back then and they explained and showed the benefit of training more than the trophy muscles.It's hard for me now to NOT do squats and d/l.

drglfr
06-06-2006, 05:46 PM
Again I want to thank all you guys for the advice. I'm even more motivated then I was before.

Jim_Gym
06-06-2006, 06:55 PM
I am 37 now and I squat and deadlift every week. Those and other 'hard' exercises like chinups and pullups have made me real strong for my size. Don't be afraid, just start with light weight and learn proper form!

Tad_T
06-06-2006, 10:55 PM
I squat every workout and deadlift every other workout.