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wilig123
02-14-2012, 04:27 AM
I'm a big believer in using free weights over machines but find myself with a load of problems with them - primarily with bench-based exercises:

a) (incline) dumbbell bench - getting the weights from knees to a stable lifting position, with ~35+ kg in each arm (and the effort that takes, detracting from the ensuing set - probably minimal but still)
b) same exercise @ exhaustion/failure, what to do with the weights - personally I hate it when people drop weights in the gym and hate to be a hyprocrit, sometimes I can't help it!
c) benching again but barbell - with a heavy weight, i find affects my confidence without a spotter/safety measure, so I never get as good a work out - I'm aware of the whole 'roll of shame' method, but having never tried it, it doesn't sound particularly safe especially at the end of a really hard set?
d) on a different note, although I do them every week, I have a bit of a fear of deadlifts/squats and putting my back out/slipping a disk, my form's good but it's still a bit of a worry...


Aside from the obvious solution of using a spotter - I go to pretty quiet gym and there's often noone around, or at least noone big enough for me to trust to spot me, does anyone have similar problems/any suggestions for solutions?

KBKB
02-14-2012, 07:07 AM
I'm a big believer in using free weights over machines but find myself with a load of problems with them - primarily with bench-based exercises:

a) (incline) dumbbell bench - getting the weights from knees to a stable lifting position, with ~35+ kg in each arm (and the effort that takes, detracting from the ensuing set - probably minimal but still)
b) same exercise @ exhaustion/failure, what to do with the weights - personally I hate it when people drop weights in the gym and hate to be a hyprocrit, sometimes I can't help it!
c) benching again but barbell - with a heavy weight, i find affects my confidence without a spotter/safety measure, so I never get as good a work out - I'm aware of the whole 'roll of shame' method, but having never tried it, it doesn't sound particularly safe especially at the end of a really hard set?
d) on a different note, although I do them every week, I have a bit of a fear of deadlifts/squats and putting my back out/slipping a disk, my form's good but it's still a bit of a worry...


Aside from the obvious solution of using a spotter - I go to pretty quiet gym and there's often noone around, or at least noone big enough for me to trust to spot me, does anyone have similar problems/any suggestions for solutions?
The problems with (lack of) spotters on the barbell exercises can be solved by using a power rack as it will provide mechanical spotters. (Provided that you adjust them correctly.)

Take a look at using Power Hooks (http://www.powerhooks.com/) for the dumbbell bench and dumbbell incline bench.

I use an Ironmaster Spotting Stand (http://www.ironmaster.com/Spotting-stand.html) for dumbbell bench work in my home gym. I did a review (http://forum.bodybuilding.com/showthread.php?t=140687791) of it last year. This is probably not a viable solution for you, however, unless you decide to buy your own equipment.

buffbrown21
02-14-2012, 07:28 AM
I'm a big believer in using free weights over machines but find myself with a load of problems with them - primarily with bench-based exercises:

a) (incline) dumbbell bench - getting the weights from knees to a stable lifting position, with ~35+ kg in each arm (and the effort that takes, detracting from the ensuing set - probably minimal but still)
b) same exercise @ exhaustion/failure, what to do with the weights - personally I hate it when people drop weights in the gym and hate to be a hyprocrit, sometimes I can't help it!
c) benching again but barbell - with a heavy weight, i find affects my confidence without a spotter/safety measure, so I never get as good a work out - I'm aware of the whole 'roll of shame' method, but having never tried it, it doesn't sound particularly safe especially at the end of a really hard set?
d) on a different note, although I do them every week, I have a bit of a fear of deadlifts/squats and putting my back out/slipping a disk, my form's good but it's still a bit of a worry...


Aside from the obvious solution of using a spotter - I go to pretty quiet gym and there's often noone around, or at least noone big enough for me to trust to spot me, does anyone have similar problems/any suggestions for solutions?

Here is the answer to A and B

TThwNhMVspk&feature=relmfu

A power rack is the answer to C

And the answer to D is to perfect your form, dont go heavier than your ability/strength

donforeman
02-14-2012, 07:29 AM
What about a variation on the strap system I made up to spot myself at home? http://forum.bodybuilding.com/showthread.php?t=140092833
Its much easier to hook the 4ft strap to the ironmaster bar because it locks and adjusts from top to bottom, but the idea could be used with a slide (buckle) and a few lengths of nylon webbing. Sorinex makes a version of this = $$$
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EeY-IbQAOeE

ndmike99
02-14-2012, 07:35 AM
Power Rack

and

Power Hooks

This could potentially take care of all your issues with your chest presses.

wilig123
02-14-2012, 08:28 AM
Ah, I've never seen either of these before... Good review there as well... The hooks look like they'd solve b) and the stands a) - maybe a combination? Just wondering though, do you find much that you miss the stands - and knock your clenched fists into the metal??- could be painful/damaging? Also, I see that you roll the dumbbells out, but they still look like you might get a lot of strain on your wrists as you put them in/take them out??

wilig123
02-14-2012, 08:31 AM
Here is the answer to A and B

TThwNhMVspk&feature=relmfu

A power rack is the answer to C

And the answer to D is to perfect your form, dont go heavier than your ability/strength

Yeah that's more or less what I do - but when the weights are really heavy, I have tended to fling them too far back and ended up having to guide them over my head safely at the expense of wrist...

yabbadabbadoher
02-14-2012, 08:38 AM
kick the dumbbells up to your shoulders, and to get them up, lift your ass off the bench (only upper back touching now, in a flat bench position) and since everyone has a higher flat than incline bench you should be able to get it up now

otiskii
02-14-2012, 09:06 AM
You do realize the more you do on your won the stronger you get right? You'll get more out of using less weight and get the dbs in place and back to the floor than by having someone help you. If you're not using a power rack then....why not?

KBKB
02-14-2012, 09:28 AM
Just wondering though, do you find much that you miss the stands - and knock your clenched fists into the metal??- could be painful/damaging? Also, I see that you roll the dumbbells out, but they still look like you might get a lot of strain on your wrists as you put them in/take them out??

With regard to missing the stands...

http://forum.bodybuilding.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=3967171&d=1324441439

...note that I have the height set so that it's hard to aim too low. And, so long as I keep the dumbells oriented as shown, you can't knock your fists into the sides of the stand either since the dumbbell itself protects the hands.

When I miss, I tend to go too high / too far. The trailing edge of the bottom of the dumbbell ends up on the stand, but the leading edge is up against the vertical portion of the stand's cradle. I've corrected that by setting the bottom of the DB down on the leading edge of the stand and then pushing / rolling it back up into the cradle.

I went to failure last night on my fifth rep of my third set using 95s. I couldn't quite achieve lock-out on that final rep and I really worked at it. Even so, I was able to lower the dumbbells back down and put them back in the cradles without issue. I didn't even overshoot.

I've never noticed wrist strain to be an issue. It's far harder for me to control the DBs once they're out of the stands than it is for me to pull them out. Keep in mind that the stand is still supporting most of the weight when I initiate pulling / rolling them out of the cradles. Note that by the time that they're out of the stands, the wrists are in a neutral position.

wilig123
02-15-2012, 04:40 AM
cool - i think the stands are the answer - thanks for the advice!

thedickus
02-15-2012, 05:38 AM
cool - i think the stands are the answer - thanks for the advice!
You do realize those stands are specific to the Iron Master Super Bench and lock into place on the cross beam of that bench. If the bench at the gym you workout at has a bench with the same sized cross beam do you plan on carrying these stands in and out of the gym with you? http://www.ironmaster.com/Spotting-stand.html#.Tzu0nFxrPw0
Learn to knee the dumbbells up into place and lower them back to your knees. With a little practice you'll be able to knee up more weight than you can probably press. As far as barbell benching just learn to set the safeties inside a power rack at a height that will catch the bar before it fractures your sternum in case you fail a lift.