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Baltimore33974
11-30-2011, 02:44 PM
Does anyone know if I could submit food I buy or grow, such as acorn squash or sunflower sprouts, to a nutritionist to test the food for the vitamin and mineral contents? Is there other sources where I could get my food tested or could I even buy a test kit of my own? Thank you for anyone who has any advice or who has tried to help.

Aeongenesys
11-30-2011, 02:50 PM
Does anyone know if I could submit food I buy or grow, such as acorn squash or sunflower sprouts, to a nutritionist to test the food for the vitamin and mineral contents? Is there other sources where I could get my food tested or could I even buy a test kit of my own? Thank you for anyone who has any advice or who has tried to help.

Not that I'm putting you down in any way, but why would
you feel the need to do such a thing?

jammyo40
11-30-2011, 02:58 PM
I believe you'd have to send it to a laboratory and that the process is not cheap. Are you running a business?

Baltimore33974
11-30-2011, 03:29 PM
I just wanted to know that the food I was buying was actually supplying me with the potassium, magnesium, Vitamin E, etc. that I need so I am not wasting my time. Foods vary wildly with their nutrition content just look at different packages of organic Romaine lettuce in the grocery store for an example.

Aeongenesys
11-30-2011, 03:34 PM
I just wanted to know that the food I was buying was actually supplying me with the potassium, magnesium, Vitamin E, etc. that I need so I am not wasting my time. Foods vary wildly with their nutrition content just look at different packages of organic Romaine lettuce in the grocery store for an example.

Separate plants in the same garden vary in micro nutrients.
It would be very costly to have the food checked at a lab, and
the cost would out way any benefits in my opinion. You can
still have it done if you want. I would just use the estimations
on packages or from a decent website and go from there.

jammyo40
11-30-2011, 03:35 PM
http://nutritiondata.self.com/

snorkelman
11-30-2011, 03:41 PM
Results in 2 minutes. Each test costs about $3.

Not sure how much the machine itself costs. CEM’s new SPRINT™ Rapid Protein Analyzer

Geoloop
11-30-2011, 03:43 PM
http://www.ocfoundation.org/

rhizome
11-30-2011, 03:46 PM
Send it to me and I'll analyze it for you ;) ;) ;)

martial-man420
11-30-2011, 03:55 PM
So you're micro managing your microvitamins?

That sounds tiring. And a bit pointless so long as you're eating a lot of mixed fruit and veg

Baltimore33974
11-30-2011, 04:09 PM
I mean you could keep buying your vegetables thinking that labels from many areas on the internet, from a doctor, or in books are about your food but foods I have come across which are well known for their magnesium, potassium, or other vitamins and minerals contained none of their specific ingredient and they were prominent brands. Soil and environmental conditions mean the difference between eating, which is for replacing our body's systems, or just eating. But now I know I can definitely not afford it. And it isn't good to obtain too much vitamins because even though they say it doesn't matter there is significant evidence from many sources and studies that say depending on the fractional absorption rate of the particular nutrient, you shouldn't exceed daily value's by more than thirty percent. Also there is just too many oxalates, inhibitors, and toxins to just eat a lot of vegetables but consuming a good amount of them is not wrong, just not good to jump in the pool and not care much about the nutrient intake, absorption based on the anti-nutrients in the food, the excess, and the damage. But I know what you are saying.