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ChristianBBer
01-10-2011, 07:22 AM
I'm watching a documentary about weight loss.

And in this snippet they claim and back it up with images from the stomach that eating a liquid meal, like soup will keep you fuller for longer than a whole meal....

6189B8q9nIY&

http://forum.bodybuilding.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=2997553&stc=1&d=1294672929

Skip to around 5:15.

My question is.....

A liquid meal is the hard food, mashed up into smaller pieces and then combined with water....

What is the difference between chewing your food ( aka smashing it up into little pieces) and then drinking water ?

Won't they both sit in the stomach in the same form ?

The only difference I can make is by grinding up the food into a liquid meal, you're essentially turning the food into smaller pieces than had they been chewed.....

So in theory couldn't you just chew your food more and more to try and get the same effect as the "liquid meal? "

JohnBrowne
01-10-2011, 08:04 AM
Soup or something similar is filling because of volume more than anything else

thepacman
01-10-2011, 08:13 AM
Sometimes digestion just isn't as simple as it seems. It can be very complex and counter intuitive and that's why you have to rely on research.

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In this study groups preloaded 17 min prior to their lunch with either chicken rice casserole, chicken rice casserole with a glass of water, and a chicken rice soup with the same amount of water (just mixed as soup instead of drank with the meal). The group that had the soup consumed less food at lunch. This satiety was short term and did not effect dinner consumption. I would be interesting to see if the results would be the same if the preload was longer then 17min...perhaps an hour or more.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10500012

Am J Clin Nutr. 1999 Oct;70(4):448-55.
Water incorporated into a food but not served with a food decreases energy intake in lean women.

Rolls BJ, Bell EA, Thorwart ML.

Nutrition Department, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park 16802-6501, USA. bjr4@psu.edu
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Previous research showed that decreasing the energy density (kJ/g) of foods by adding water to them can lead to reductions in energy intake. Few studies have examined how water consumed as a beverage affects food intake.

OBJECTIVE: This study examined the effects of water, both served with a food and incorporated into a food, on satiety.

DESIGN: In a within-subjects design, 24 lean women consumed breakfast, lunch, and dinner in our laboratory 1 d/wk for 4 wk. Subjects received 1 of 3 isoenergetic (1128 kJ) preloads 17 min before lunch on 3 d and no preload on 1 d. The preloads consisted of 1) chicken rice casserole, 2) chicken rice casserole served with a glass of water (356 g), and 3) chicken rice soup. The soup contained the same ingredients (type and amount) as the casserole that was served with water.

RESULTS: Decreasing the energy density of and increasing the volume of the preload by adding water to it significantly increased fullness and reduced hunger and subsequent energy intake at lunch. The equivalent amount of water served as a beverage with a food did not affect satiety. Energy intake at lunch was 1209 +/- 125 kJ after the soup compared with 1657 +/- 148 and 1639 +/- 148 kJ after the casserole with and without water, respectively. Subjects did not compensate at dinner for this reduction in lunch intake.

CONCLUSION: Consuming foods with a high water content more effectively reduced subsequent energy intake than did drinking water with food.

thepacman
01-10-2011, 08:16 AM
Also it could be because liquid meals have a higher thermic effect which could affect satiety.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10911770

Br J Nutr. 2000 Jun;83(6):623-8.
The physical state of a meal affects hormone release and postprandial thermogenesis.

Peracchi M, Santangelo A, Conte D, Fraquelli M, Tagliabue R, Gebbia C, Porrini M.

Department of Gastroenterology, University of Milan, Ospedale Maggiore-IRCCS, Italy. gastrbia@imiucca.csi.unimi.it
Abstract

There is evidence that food consistency may influence postprandial physiological responses. Recently we found that homogenization of a vegetable-rich meal significantly delayed the gastric emptying rate and was more satiating than the same meal in solid-liquid form. In this present study we investigated whether homogenization also influences endocrine and metabolic responses to the meal. Eight healthy men, aged 21-28 (mean 24.5) years, were given the meal (cooked vegetables 250 g, cheese 35 g, croutons 50 g and olive oil 25 g, with water 300 ml; total energy 2.6 MJ) in both solid-liquid (SM) and homogenized (HM) form, in random order, at 1-week intervals. Variables assayed were plasma glucose, insulin and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) levels for 2 h and diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT) for 5 h. Plasma glucose pattern was similar after both meals. However, HM induced significantly greater insulin, GIP and DIT responses than SM. Mean integrated areas under the curves (AUC) were 1.7 (SEM 0.38) v. 1.2 (SEM 0.33) U/l per 120 min (P = 0.005) for insulin, 19.9 (SEM 2.44) v. 16 (SEM 1.92) nmol/l per 120 min (P = 0.042) for GIP, and 237.7 (SEM 16.32) v. 126.4 (SEM 23.48) kJ/300 min (P = 0.0029) for DIT respectively. Differences between GIP-AUC after HM and SM correlated significantly with differences between insulin-AUC after HM and SM (r2 0.62, P = 0.021). These findings demonstrate that homogenization of a meal results in a coordinated series of changes of physiological gastroentero-pancreatic functions and confirm that the physical state of the meal plays an important role in modulating endocrine and metabolic responses to food.

ChristianBBer
01-10-2011, 10:32 AM
Soup or something similar is filling because of volume more than anything else

No offense bro but that didn't answer anything.

I even said " What if I ate solid food and drank a bunch of water.... the volume would be the same"

I'm looking more or so in terms of the " quantity OF the volume" that makes the digestion process different.

PHRICK
01-10-2011, 10:43 AM
OK K sorry i have to put this out there. I am done with med school in a month... radiology,,, majoring in Ultrasound. i got to tell you this those pics up there are a bunch of worthless information... the reason why it seems to much fuller in the stomach is liquid gives off alot of reflection due to the sound beams rather then the solids which are more compressed. The liquid in the stomach could be an 8oz glass of choc milk for all you know hahaha and it just gives off double the echogenicity. Eat your veggies to get full thats all i got to say soup is a big waste of a meal full of sodium.

str8flexed
01-10-2011, 01:20 PM
I'm watching a documentary about weight loss.

And in this snippet they claim and back it up with images from the stomach that eating a liquid meal, like soup will keep you fuller for longer than a whole meal....

6189B8q9nIY&

http://forum.bodybuilding.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=2997553&stc=1&d=1294672929

Skip to around 5:15.

My question is.....

A liquid meal is the hard food, mashed up into smaller pieces and then combined with water....

What is the difference between chewing your food ( aka smashing it up into little pieces) and then drinking water ?

Won't they both sit in the stomach in the same form ?

The only difference I can make is by grinding up the food into a liquid meal, you're essentially turning the food into smaller pieces than had they been chewed.....

So in theory couldn't you just chew your food more and more to try and get the same effect as the "liquid meal? "
depends on the volume and the viscosity. Just drinking water won't do it, though water will help some, but something more viscous will be better.

for example there was a study comparing equal calories from a shake or from whole food and showed the shake had superior satiety. Then they took the same shake and either blended it for short period of time or a much longer period of time to whip it up and make it more volumous and even though it was still the same calories and weight, because it had so much more volume it provided much more satiety.

There is a whole field of research on hunger and satiety called volumetrics and it's pretty damned interesting

AustrianOakJr
01-10-2011, 03:56 PM
Then they took the same shake and either blended it for short period of time or a much longer period of time to whip it up and make it more volumous and even though it was still the same calories and weight, because it had so much more volume it provided much more satiety.


I have noticed this when I have champion ultra-met shakes on hand or gaspari's myofusion.......they are thicker shakes for whatever reason and they really do curb hunger longer than thinner shakes even when calorie contest is similar. Interesting that there is more than just anecdotal evidence for this...

gehlmauer
01-11-2011, 12:06 AM
Give more details please? This is really good information....You have done an great job.Thanks for sharing that, it was wonderful of you.
Good luck!


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