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Sackett
10-15-2009, 02:33 PM
A friend of mine who knows I lift asked me today about what I do as far as routines. I explained I lift 3 to 4 times a week depending on the routine at the time with low inpact cardio 5 to 6 times. I told him my goals were strength and endurance and shared some of my routines. I even suggested SS.

He said that was more than he wanted to get into and that he just wanted to maintain the muscle mass he has and have a healthy heart. He did not care about getting any stronger. or gaining mass

Here is what I suggested with 30 to 45 minutes of some kind of cardio on Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday:

Monday/Wednesday/Friday

Squat 3x 8-12
Stiff-Leg Dead Lift 3x 8-12
Bench Press 3x 8-12
Bent-Over Row 3x 8-12
Pull Downs 3x 8-12
Military Press 3x 8-12
Dips 3x 8-12
Barbell Curl 3x 8-12
Crunch 3x 8-12


It made realize that for alot of us this is a hobbie that we really get into (I love trying to lift heavy weights and doing killer routines but there are many who do it totally for health
reasons and to look good and not willing to put in the hours that a powerlifter or bodybuilder does?

What would you suggest for those people.

dbx
10-15-2009, 02:39 PM
He said that was more than he wanted to get into and that he just wanted to maintain the muscle mass he has and have a healthy heart. He did not care about getting any stronger. or gaining mass.

^^^^^


What would you suggest for those people.

Nothing. Nothing at all ;)

ntrllftr
10-15-2009, 02:47 PM
Nothing. Nothing at all ;)

Damn it Kevin! That's twice in one week you beat me. :mad:

snoack
10-15-2009, 02:49 PM
What would you suggest for those people.

stay out of the gym so they don't get in my fuken way???

that's all I've got...

ejthomp
10-15-2009, 02:51 PM
.......
He said that was more than he wanted to get into and that he just wanted to maintain the muscle mass he has and have a healthy heart. He did not care about getting any stronger. or gaining mass.......

What would you suggest for those people.....

Tell him to eat better! Push ups, sit ups, pull ups and walking!

gbg
10-15-2009, 02:52 PM
Tell him to take candle light yoga and some cardio classes.

snoack
10-15-2009, 02:56 PM
We get these guys over in the free weights section from time to time. They'll break off from the cardio herd, wander over, play around with a few exercises, then leave.

At best, they're an oddity. At worst, they have an annoying habit of sensing which piece of equipment I'm getting ready to use next. Gave one of them a stare that could have curdled milk one time when I saw them heading for the power rack as I was gearing up for squats.

Fifty+
10-15-2009, 03:16 PM
A friend of mine who knows I lift asked me today about what I do as far as routines. I explained I lift 3 to 4 times a week depending on the routine at the time with low inpact cardio 5 to 6 times. I told him my goals were strength and endurance and shared some of my routines. I even suggested SS.

He said that was more than he wanted to get into and that he just wanted to maintain the muscle mass he has and have a healthy heart. He did not care about getting any stronger. or gaining mass

Here is what I suggested with 30 to 45 minutes of some kind of cardio on Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday:

Monday/Wednesday/Friday

Squat 3x 8-12
Stiff-Leg Dead Lift 3x 8-12
Bench Press 3x 8-12
Bent-Over Row 3x 8-12
Pull Downs 3x 8-12
Military Press 3x 8-12
Dips 3x 8-12
Barbell Curl 3x 8-12
Crunch 3x 8-12


It made realize that for alot of us this is a hobbie that we really get into (I love trying to lift heavy weights and doing killer routines but there are many who do it totally for health
reasons and to look good and not willing to put in the hours that a powerlifter or bodybuilder does?

What would you suggest for those people.



What exactly does "maintaining the muscle mass he has" mean? If it's overall health and conditioning he's looking for, lifting weights is only one part of the equation. What other physical activities is he involved with? A fullbody workout twice a week combined with other physical activities should help him meet his goals. If you're going to help him develop a routine, do not get stuck with the exercises you posted above. Every workout should be a little different. If he does not have the mind thought to build muscle or see how heavy he can lift, then simply help him find the joy of lifting. More times then not, when people see results in the mirror they have a tendancy to push a little harder. Keep it enjoyable and give him that opportunity.

ntrllftr
10-15-2009, 03:24 PM
Listen I'm going to be totally honest here....

There is no point in telling someone what to do.
Why?
Because they will do what they want to no matter what.

Either you are into fitness or you are not. There is no inbetween.

Good luck!

Sackett
10-15-2009, 03:47 PM
What exactly does "maintaining the muscle mass he has" mean? If it's overall health and conditioning he's looking for, lifting weights is only one part of the equation. What other physical activities is he involved with? A fullbody workout twice a week combined with other physical activities should help him meet his goals. If you're going to help him develop a routine, do not get stuck with the exercises you posted above. Every workout should be a little different. If he does not have the mind thought to build muscle or see how heavy he can lift, then simply help him find the joy of lifting. More times then not, when people see results in the mirror they have a tendancy to push a little harder. Keep it enjoyable and give him that opportunity.

Honestly I did not know what to tell him. From the very beginning I knew I wanted to get strong and that has been my main focus except for a time I flirted with BB. I hated it.

What I gave him was my very first routine except at that time I was running 25+ miles a week.

Fifty+
10-15-2009, 04:40 PM
Honestly I did not know what to tell him. From the very beginning I knew I wanted to get strong and that has been my main focus except for a time I flirted with BB. I hated it.

What I gave him was my very first routine except at that time I was running 25+ miles a week.



Hey, you did good. You can help someone get started. You can help motivate someone by being there. You can do a lot of things but the bottom line is, you lead them to the water and if they want to drink..... Sometimes a little encouragement goes a long way.

StressMonkey
10-15-2009, 07:36 PM
Hey, you did good. You can help someone get started. You can help motivate someone by being there. You can do a lot of things but the bottom line is, you lead them to the water and if they want to drink..... Sometimes a little encouragement goes a long way.

He sounds like a lost cause to me. "Design me a weightlifting routine but I don't care about strength or mass." Um, ok.

snoack
10-16-2009, 06:41 AM
He sounds like a lost cause to me. "Design me a weightlifting routine but I don't care about strength or mass." Um, ok.

it's pointless and hopeless. I don't understand where that kind of mindset comes from, but I'm going to guess a combination of lack of knowledge coupled with lack of motivation.

DeathtoToasters
10-16-2009, 07:21 AM
I always ask people if they are willing to change their diet at all? If they say no....I move on.

agsuper
10-16-2009, 08:30 AM
stay out of the gym so they don't get in my fuken way???

that's all I've got...

Amen!

Fifty+
10-16-2009, 10:26 AM
Listen I'm going to be totally honest here....

There is no point in telling someone what to do.
Why?
Because they will do what they want to no matter what.

[b]Either you are into fitness or you are not. There is no inbetween.[b]

Good luck!



I don't believe that any of the people on this forum who worked through transformations were into fitness when they started. My original goals were to drop weight and get in better physical condition. I did not think about "strength" or "building mass" because I simply did not have the knowledge to differentiate between the two or how to achieve it. I juist started. Then I started learning. I read books but many use internet forums. I don't think we should bash people because they don't meet our criteria for this sport. 15 years ago I sure the hell didn't.

dbx
10-16-2009, 10:59 AM
I don't believe that any of the people on this forum who worked through transformations were into fitness when they started.

I submit that they were certainly into fitness when they "worked through transformations." It's to the degree that differs among those who start. But by golly, they all start somewhere, and that somewhere is "getting into fitness".

Phil, I can't speak for Carl or the others, but I wasn't bashing anyone (maybe he was?) with my short post. I was merely reflecting upon these two things that I've come to wholeheartedly believe:

1. Bringing the horse to water gets old after a while (workplace, friends, family etc..). And in my own experience, I come away feeling like I just pissed into the wind about 99% of the time. And that 1%? While it'd be nice to say "it makes it all worth it", I consider it a waste of f;cking time. They'd first have to show me that they're actually serious and put forth an effort to demonstrate such. Then? Yeah, I'll go through the whole spiel.

2. Diet - Rinse & repeat #1.

It's not a matter of being cold toward anyone. It's a matter of having gone through the damn drill umpteen freakin' times, only to find that your coaxing was akin trying to teach a dog to drive a car. He'll walk around it, sniff it, even piss on the tires, but he ain't going to drive it unless he wants to (wait, wut? :eek: ).

IRL, if my friend said what the OP's said to him, I would have given him a simple "It really doesn't work that way"...followed by a VERY brief explanation of why it doesn't...and then gone from there. I truly believe people have to fin it within themselves to make lifestyle changes. Nobody would dispute that some encouragement can go a long way. It's just that my level of encouragement is directly proportionate to the earnest effort and interest shown by the person "needing" it.

jaguar007
10-16-2009, 11:08 AM
I don't believe that any of the people on this forum who worked through transformations were into fitness when they started. My original goals were to drop weight and get in better physical condition. I did not think about "strength" or "building mass" because I simply did not have the knowledge to differentiate between the two or how to achieve it. I juist started. Then I started learning. I read books but many use internet forums. I don't think we should bash people because they don't meet our criteria for this sport. 15 years ago I sure the hell didn't.

I agree. I can't believe how many people are bashing this guys friend because he does not share the same goals that they do. Not everyone wants to get bigger. Some people just want to tone up and get in better shape. We should applaud them for taking the first step. If someone can only dedicate 2-3 days a week to do something fitness oriented, it sure beats getting fat and being a couch potato.

Raiden1969
10-16-2009, 11:59 AM
I don't know whether or not your are a newbie, but this type of person angers a lot of people. Why? They hate half-azzes here. The general thought - and I agree - is if you're not moving forward then you're moving backward. And as you get older, all the more true. Now, if this person wants to maintain, why lift beyond 1x a week? And...this isn't a hobby, it's pain, and I don't really like lifting. BUT you gotta stay strong for your self and your family, man, so...one pays the piper.

Raiden1969
10-16-2009, 12:00 PM
Toning up is a dirty two words. We hate that.

snoack
10-16-2009, 12:13 PM
I agree. I can't believe how many people are bashing this guys friend because he does not share the same goals that they do. Not everyone wants to get bigger. Some people just want to tone up and get in better shape. We should applaud them for taking the first step. If someone can only dedicate 2-3 days a week to do something fitness oriented, it sure beats getting fat and being a couch potato.

I'm going to go down a path that I don't normally go down with this.

"He said that was more than he wanted to get into and that he just wanted to maintain the muscle mass he has and have a healthy heart. He did not care about getting any stronger. or gaining mass"

what does this even mean? If I'm reading this right, this guy sounds like a couch potato. What kind of muscle mass does he have that he needs to maintain? How the hell does he think he's going to do any kind of strength training with gaining any kind of mass or strength? Thye best thing for him, based on this, is probably circuit training, which is what I would have told him right up front. If he wants to "tone" up and get in better shape but not gain any strength or mass, he would be better served getting on a treadmill and do a nice, easy paced stroll. I would say run, but, if I'm getting a proper read on this, it doesn't sound like he's motivated enough to put in any kind of real effort. And this is before we even get into discussing diet. What is he eating? Is he going to be willing to make the dietary changes to support any kind of real training program, or does he think he can get away with eating crap if he does a couple 30 minute eliptical sessions per week?

We all know exsactly the type of person the OP is talking about. Far too often there are an abundance of them at the gym. The biggest problem is that they don't KNOW what they want. They don't possess the knowledge to understand that the vision they have in their heads isn't realistic...the vision that if they do a few sets of curls they're going to look like a professional BBer or some such crap.

I'm 100% with Kevin on this one. If you're not willing to commit fully, then I'm not willing to waste my time. It's that simple.

...Kennedy
10-16-2009, 12:21 PM
A friend of mine who knows I lift asked me today about what I do as far as routines. I explained I lift 3 to 4 times a week depending on the routine at the time with low inpact cardio 5 to 6 times. I told him my goals were strength and endurance and shared some of my routines. I even suggested SS.

He said that was more than he wanted to get into and that he just wanted to maintain the muscle mass he has and have a healthy heart. He did not care about getting any stronger. or gaining mass

Here is what I suggested with 30 to 45 minutes of some kind of cardio on Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday:

Monday/Wednesday/Friday

Squat 3x 8-12
Stiff-Leg Dead Lift 3x 8-12
Bench Press 3x 8-12
Bent-Over Row 3x 8-12
Pull Downs 3x 8-12
Military Press 3x 8-12
Dips 3x 8-12
Barbell Curl 3x 8-12
Crunch 3x 8-12


It made realize that for alot of us this is a hobbie that we really get into (I love trying to lift heavy weights and doing killer routines but there are many who do it totally for health
reasons and to look good and not willing to put in the hours that a powerlifter or bodybuilder does?

What would you suggest for those people.

I think you'd make a good friend.

That's a decent routine for him and his current goals. With any luck, he'll get bit by the iron bug while doing the routine you suggested and take it to a higher level.

EggSuckingLeech
10-16-2009, 03:35 PM
wow.. the intolerance is thick in here :)

When I started about 2 years ago I would have probably said the same thing.

"He said that was more than he wanted to get into and that he just wanted to maintain the muscle mass he has and have a healthy heart. He did not care about getting any stronger. or gaining mass"

Allow me to translate this... This means he doesn't want to be a power lifter or bodybuilder (in the Mr. Olympia sense). It's exactly the same thing as the guy saying (God forbid) "tone up". What I find somewhat funny is the viceral reactions to this because it's not that literal, guys. What this means is that the guy wants to look good and be physically fit. He doesn't want to look like Jay Cutler and he doesn't want to bench 500 lbs. Now is this a ridiculous concern? ABSOLUTELY! You don't look like an IFBB pro by accident lol! But alot of guys don't realize this. It's simply not being educated about bodybuilding.

So in my case, I too was going for health. I didn't want to get huge. I didn't want to set bench records. But only after pouring thru forums, books, and magazines do I realize that this "worry" is totally bogus. And guess what? Now I wanna be huge lol!

But c'mon guys. While the above statements might be ludicrous, so is your impatience for such statements because they are uttered CONSTANTLY. It's really not such a big deal ya know? Instead of smart ass responses, why not just teach what you have learned?

I agree that you can't make a horse drink but dang - if he comes to the watering hole by asking questions then that's a pretty damn good indication that he will listen to what you have to say.

My two cents.

boathead
10-16-2009, 05:03 PM
i don't get the notion that is sometimes thrown around that this is a site for stage bodybuilding competitors....who's to say what type of body a person wants to build? the mission of this site is stated clearly:

The Bodybuilding.com Mission:
"To help our visitors reach their health, fitness and appearance goals through
information, motivation and supplementation."

i'm 7 years into this, and i still waffle on my goals. sometimes i want mass, sometimes strength. in august of 2003, i was in detox, day 4, and i woke up and did 10 pushups. that is how i started. there was no plan other than that i wanted something more than my loser lifestyle.

dbx
10-16-2009, 05:50 PM
wow.. the intolerance is thick in here :)

What this means is that the guy wants to look good and be physically fit. He doesn't want to look like Jay Cutler and he doesn't want to bench 500 lbs.

It's not intolerance, it's called "been there, done that". And it is likely you and other new members who don't understand that nobody is being mean here. You just see it that way. Myself, Snoack and ntrllftr all have different goals, with ntrllftr being the only one who competes of the 3 of us who would like to look like Jay Cutler. And yet, we've all expressed the same feeling. Think about that for a minute. You're new, and will likely have a different take on this after you've gleefully shared your new found joy of a healthier lifestyle (whatever that means to you) with other people for the next year or so. You'll soon realize that 90%+ of the family, friends and coworkers who say/ask, "Hey, you look great, I've been wanting to blah, blah, blah... What should I do?" will not follow through on anything you tell them. They'll look at you with this really intent and fascinated look on their face....and then go there merry way. This has nothing to do with bodybuilding! It has everything to do with personal motivation...to do anything! And that's what the 3 of us are talking about. This is my last attempt to try to clarify to those who don't understand. And if you don't think any of the three of us doesn't continually try to help people here, then you really don't get it.

x-trainer ben
10-16-2009, 06:24 PM
It's not intolerance, it's called "been there, done that". And it is likely you and other new members who don't understand that nobody is being mean here. You just see it that way. Myself, Snoack and ntrllftr all have different goals, with ntrllftr being the only one who competes of the 3 of us who would like to look like Jay Cutler. And yet, we've all expressed the same feeling. Think about that for a minute. You're new, and will likely have a different take on this after you've gleefully shared your new found joy of a healthier lifestyle (whatever that means to you) with other people for the next year or so. You'll soon realize that 90%+ of the family, friends and coworkers who say/ask, "Hey, you look great, I've been wanting to blah, blah, blah... What should I do?" will not follow through on anything you tell them. They'll look at you with this really intent and fascinated look on their face....and then go there merry way. This has nothing to do with bodybuilding! It has everything to do with personal motivation...to do anything! And that's what the 3 of us are talking about. This is my last attempt to try to clarify to those who don't understand. And if you don't think any of the three of us doesn't continually try to help people here, then you really don't get it.



Here is the deal, your both right! You discourage new "fitness people" when you overwhelm them with too much information from years of knowledge. If you want to motivate them then you give them a little bit of info and see what they do with it. If they ask for more then they were bit by the bug and you help them more if you truly care.

The tendency on this site is to say" if your not hardcore like we are then gtf out" Not realizing that many folks need assistance/help not a kick in the ass. If you are to tired/old/uninterested/ in helping others that is cool but realize Americans are fatter than ever now and are going to be asking for help for the next 30+ years. You can help them or tell them to screw off.

And yes most people do not follow through, even family members, all that you can do is try and be helpful if that is your nature.

Reread the first 10 responses again and see what kind of vibe you get(everyone) ?

dbx
10-16-2009, 06:38 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v509/dbx/Geez.gif

...Kennedy
10-16-2009, 06:45 PM
Maybe there should just be an O35 Beginner's section.

Either that, or the very experienced could just avoid the threads that are obviously from or about complete n00bs to lifting...

dbx
10-16-2009, 06:47 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v509/dbx/Geez.gif

Once again..........

chodan9
10-16-2009, 07:11 PM
I tried to design a simple workout for my wife one time.
she said she wanted to do something to get in better shape.
so I worked up a routine based on light resistance bands that would take 10-15 minutes to complete.
She barely looked at it, said it looked too hard. I realized then she just wanted to pretend that she was interested but not go so far as to actually do anything that resembled exercise.

So my stance is I am not even going to try and help her until she shows some initiative herself.

So if I'm not helping her, why would I help someone else I don't know, help a 3rd party who isn't interested in what I have to offer?

Reality_Check
10-16-2009, 07:13 PM
stay out of the gym so they don't get in my fuken way???


x 1000

...Kennedy
10-16-2009, 07:16 PM
Can't be chasing away new members, fellows...














... they might turn out to be supplement customers. :D

x-trainer ben
10-16-2009, 07:41 PM
I tried to design a simple workout for my wife one time.
she said she wanted to do something to get in better shape.
so I worked up a routine based on light resistance bands that would take 10-15 minutes to complete.
She barely looked at it, said it looked too hard. I realized then she just wanted to pretend that she was interested but not go so far as to actually do anything that resembled exercise.

So my stance is I am not even going to try and help her until she shows some initiative herself.

So if I'm not helping her, why would I help someone else I don't know, help a 3rd party who isn't interested in what I have to offer?

So you said to your wife, "sorry babe been there and done that, i am done with you."

or are you gonna help her the next time she gets a lil incling of motivation?

just curious?

x-trainer ben
10-16-2009, 07:44 PM
A friend of mine who knows I lift asked me today about what I do as far as routines. I explained I lift 3 to 4 times a week depending on the routine at the time with low inpact cardio 5 to 6 times. I told him my goals were strength and endurance and shared some of my routines. I even suggested SS.

He said that was more than he wanted to get into and that he just wanted to maintain the muscle mass he has and have a healthy heart. He did not care about getting any stronger. or gaining mass

Here is what I suggested with 30 to 45 minutes of some kind of cardio on Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday:

Monday/Wednesday/Friday

Squat 3x 8-12
Stiff-Leg Dead Lift 3x 8-12
Bench Press 3x 8-12
Bent-Over Row 3x 8-12
Pull Downs 3x 8-12
Military Press 3x 8-12
Dips 3x 8-12
Barbell Curl 3x 8-12
Crunch 3x 8-12


It made realize that for alot of us this is a hobbie that we really get into (I love trying to lift heavy weights and doing killer routines but there are many who do it totally for health
reasons and to look good and not willing to put in the hours that a powerlifter or bodybuilder does?

What would you suggest for those people.

The basics 30 min of cardio something every day or 3.5 hrs a week according to the AHA and your weight program.

StressMonkey
10-16-2009, 08:17 PM
The tendency on this site is to say" if your not hardcore like we are then gtf out" Not realizing that many folks need assistance/help not a kick in the ass. If you are to tired/old/uninterested/ in helping others that is cool but realize Americans are fatter than ever now and are going to be asking for help for the next 30+ years. You can help them or tell them to screw off.


Sorry, but I don't see this place as being like that at all. When I joined I knew absolutely zilch about lifting and had never been athletic in my life. I had an open mind and a willingness to learn and I've gotten nothing but positive feedback from people. I would laugh if someone called me hardcore now. If someone comes onto a site called bodybuilding.com and says they don't care about gaining mass or strength do you honestly expect people to applaud that?

socket
10-16-2009, 08:20 PM
First off, I think you suggested a good starting plan for this guy.

Second,
" He said that was more than he wanted to get into and that he just wanted to maintain the muscle mass he has and have a healthy heart. He did not care about getting any stronger. or gaining mass"
He has basicly just told you he is not interested in bodybuilding or strength training. At that point he's left with jogging, push ups, pull ups, sit ups, jump roping, etc. I'd suggest he join a racket ball club. Thats a great activity for the heart.

Third,
many of the guys here get pissed about posts like this cause we've been there and done that so many times.Someone, somewhere, as asked us for advice, and then when we give, they don't take it, or do what your friend did, and say "thats too much." I've brought friends to the gym, and had a few that 15-20 minutes in were asking if we were almost done. I had one friend go outside and take a smoke break!
A person needs to start somewhere, but they need to first set a goal so they know where they're goin.
I am one of those guys thats been lifting since I was a teenager.it was simple for me really, I could go on getting beat in fights and in sports and keep lookin like a pale faced long skinny limbed zit faced monkey boy or start training. I used to get so much **** for my skinny arse arms and legs. So I had a clear objective, get as big and as strong as I naturaly could get. My big bro taught me some stuff. I fell in love with the pump. Then I found the magazines..........no not the porn.........the flex and ironman. Then I found trainning partners, then went from basements to gyms. the rest is history.
Your friend doesn't want to gain mass or strength....so thats that, and a BODYBUILDING forum isn't going to be much help.
good luck in your journey Sackett.
by the way, your post name looks very simular to mine............I'm not sure I like that............................................





oh just kidin(-;

x-trainer ben
10-16-2009, 08:28 PM
Sorry, but I don't see this place as being like that at all. When I joined I knew absolutely zilch about lifting and had never been athletic in my life. I had an open mind and a willingness to learn and I've gotten nothing but positive feedback from people. I would laugh if someone called me hardcore now. If someone comes onto a site called bodybuilding.com and says they don't care about gaining mass or strength do you honestly expect people to applaud that?

My only point was if you re read the comments his friend was dismissed as a lost cause. I tried to say approach him differently and THEN if he was not interested then forgetaboutit.
Lets face it our kind of exercise makes you sweat alot, hurt for days, and most people will not engage in that type of strenuous activity. We live in a microwave society and most people want it quick and easy.

StressMonkey
10-16-2009, 08:35 PM
My only point was if you re read the comments his friend was dismissed as a lost cause. I tried to say approach him differently and THEN if he was not interested then forgetaboutit.
Lets face it our kind of exercise makes you sweat alot, hurt for days, and most people will not engage in that type of strenuous activity. We live in a microwave society and most people want it quick and easy.

Yep. Very true. I've had two people ask me about getting into shape when they saw how I had changed. When they heard they have to work out at least three times a week and completely change their diet they lost interest.

chodan9
10-16-2009, 08:45 PM
So you said to your wife, "sorry babe been there and done that, i am done with you."

or are you gonna help her the next time she gets a lil incling of motivation?

just curious?

cant honestly say
like most of us she has a good idea what is required, If takes steps in the right direction I'll be there to support her, I just cant do it for her.

EggSuckingLeech
10-16-2009, 09:15 PM
meh - I guess it just depends how much you really plan on investing into someone else's "plan". If a guy asked for help and you spent hours trying to create a workout plan for him and it was tossed aside I can understand getting frustrated. But a reply on a forum just isn't all that much effort in my book. My head is in the same space as Fifty+. And my reaction was like Ben's - the guy was dismissed as a lost cause immediately. Just seemed hasty to me that's all.

and btw I was hardly painting this O35 forum with a broad brush. I like this forum more than any other bb forum I've been to! It's all good.

thebigguy1
10-16-2009, 09:53 PM
Listen I'm going to be totally honest here....

There is no point in telling someone what to do.
Why?
Because they will do what they want to no matter what.

Either you are into fitness or you are not. There is no in between.

Good luck!

Couldn't agree more...been there, done that.

But good luck, nonetheless!

Ron III---III

KyleAaron
10-16-2009, 11:05 PM
Honestly I did not know what to tell him.
Your advice was fair and reasonable, and unlike the others here, I do believe a person has a right to "maintain" rather than trying to grow. There is no moral obligation to beef up.

However, you are giving him free advice, and people value things according to what they paid for them. People just don't take free advice.

I know a trainer around here who used to give out free diet plans. Nobody followed them. Then he charged $50 for them, most people followed them.

In the Fitness Australia code of ethics, there's a bit about not forming intimate relationships with the people you train. It mucks things up. By the same token, if you already have an intimate relationship with someone, you should not train them - they won't listen, and your attempts to make them listen will muck the relationship up.

Tell your buddy to hire a personal trainer or coach.

thebigguy1
10-17-2009, 01:22 AM
"Tell your buddy to hire a personal trainer or coach."

Now THAT is excellent advice...

tonester
10-17-2009, 06:22 AM
He did not care about getting any stronger.

The best advice you could give your friend would be to remind him that at this age, the strength you have today won't be the same next year. His maintenance strategy is bogus in light of the degeneration that goes on with age.

Tell him he should aim to get much stronger so that he is better able to keep the wolves at bay.

SR800
10-17-2009, 06:51 AM
Wow, strong, needless, unhelpful, disrespectful, negativity in this thread. To the OP, that is a good start, I might take out a few exercises or switch some up. Thanks for caring enough to try to help a friend. Positive energy and karma are your friend. Peace.

BergMuscle
10-17-2009, 08:22 AM
To the OP, that is a good start, I might take out a few exercises or switch some up. Thanks for caring enough to try to help a friend. Positive energy and karma are your friend. Peace.

That and don't be surprised, or disappointed, if your friend doesn't stick with it. There are a bunch of red flags that he isn't really interested in weight training, at least not the way you are.

TheKansan
10-17-2009, 09:24 AM
The thing is that as long as you get this guy to come back to the gym and keeps working out, he will become more motivated as time passes. He will look at equipment and wonder how to use it. He will see other people working out who are in good shape and want to look like them.

Even if he never gets into lifting, imagine how much healthier his heart will be with regular cardio.

mikieson
10-17-2009, 10:26 AM
Someone say Average Joes?
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/extramustard/images/Dodgeball.jpg